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Strengthen the Evidence for Maternal and Child Health Programs

Search Results: MCHLine

Items in this list may be obtained from the sources cited. Contact information reflects the most current data about the source that has been provided to the MCH Digital Library.


Displaying records 1 through 20 (214 total).

American Academy of Pediatrics. n.d.. Mom! Dad! Ask the doctor about my emotional development, too!. Elk Grove Village, IL: American Academy of Pediatrics, 12 items.

Annotation: These advertising materials promote the importance of mental health as part of a health supervision visit. They are designed to be displayed on a bulletin board or used as a table top display in a pediatric practice. One version focuses on young children and the other on teenagers. Both versions are available in English and Spanish. Other versions are provided for use on Facebook pages or in parent newsletters.

Contact: American Academy of Pediatrics, 345 Park Boulevard, Itasca, IL 60143, Telephone: (630) 626-6000 Secondary Telephone: (847) 434-4000 Fax: (847) 434-8000 Web Site: https://www.aap.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Child mental health, Emotional development, Health supervision, Pediatric care, Public awareness materials, Social interaction

American Academy of Pediatrics. n.d.. Tips to promote social-emotional health among young children. Elk Grove Village, IL: American Academy of Pediatrics, 4 pp.

Annotation: This tip sheet provides advice to help promote the social and emotional health of young children. It includes separate tips for parents, pediatricians, and early education and child care providers. Links to additional resources produced by the American Academy of Pediatrics are also provided.

Contact: American Academy of Pediatrics, 345 Park Boulevard, Itasca, IL 60143, Telephone: (630) 626-6000 Secondary Telephone: (847) 434-4000 Fax: (847) 434-8000 Web Site: https://www.aap.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Child mental health, Emotional development, Health supervision, Social interaction, Young children

American Academy of Pediatrics. n.d.. Tips to promote social-emotional health among teens. Elk Grove Village, IL: American Academy of Pediatrics, 4 pp.

Annotation: This tip sheet provides advice to help promote social and emotional health among adolescents. It includes separate tips for teenagers, parents, schools, and pediatricians. Links to additional resources produced by the American Academy of Pediatrics are also provided.

Contact: American Academy of Pediatrics, 345 Park Boulevard, Itasca, IL 60143, Telephone: (630) 626-6000 Secondary Telephone: (847) 434-4000 Fax: (847) 434-8000 Web Site: https://www.aap.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent development, Adolescent mental health, Emotional development, Health supervision, Social interaction

Singleton M, Atukpawu-Tipton G, Joraanstad A. 2022. Advancing equity in home visiting. Arlington, VA: James Bell Associates, 9 pp. (National Home Visiting Resource Center innovation roundup brief)

Annotation: This brief summarizes several initiatives to advance health and/or racial equity in home visiting. Some examples include: Home Visiting Collaborative Improvement and Innovation Network 2.0 (HV CoIIN 2.0) Health Equity Collaborative, Michigan Home Visiting Initiative (MHV), and Massachusetts Racial Equity Movement. The brief also highlights the National Leadership Academy for the Public's Health (NLAPH) program.

Contact: James Bell Associates, 3033 Wilson Boulevard, Suite 650, Arlington, VA 22201, Telephone: (800) 546-3230 Fax: (703) 243-3017 E-mail: info@jbassoc.com Web Site: http://www.jbassoc.com

Keywords: Child health, Early childhood development, Ethnic groups, Family support services, Health equity, Home visiting, Model programs, Race, Social factors

DiverityDataKids.org. 2020. Child opportunity index. Waltham, MA: DiverityDataKids.org,

Annotation: The Child Opportunity Index (COI) measures and maps the quality of resources and conditions that matter for children to develop in a healthy way in the neighborhoods where they live. It was developed in 2014 in collaboration with the Kirwan Institute for the Study of Race and Ethnicity at Ohio State University and version 2.0 was released in 2020.

Contact: DiversityDataKids.org, Institute for Child, Youth, and Family Policy, Brandeis Universiy Heller School for Social Policy and Management, Waltham, MA Web Site: http://diversitydatakids.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Child development, Children, Neighborhoods, Social conditions, Statistics

Pediatrics Supporting Parents Learning Community. 2020. Core practices, strategies, and resources for supporting social emotional development in pediatric care. Boston, MA: National Institute for Children's Health Quality, 26 pp.

Annotation: This packet provides the best strategies for participating practices so pediatric providers across the country can benefit from their learning from a quality improvement framework with 18 pediatric primary care practices to test and refine strategies to improve their effectiveness in fostering patients’ social and emotional development from birth to age 3. These core practices and strategies serve as a roadmap for the participating pediatric providers and includes additional resources developed as part of this initiative or identified as useful. The document summaries strategies for each core element and lists additional resources. Sample forms are included.

Contact: National Institute for Children's Health Quality, 30 Winter Street, Sixth Floor, Boston, MA 02108, Telephone: (617) 391-2700 Secondary Telephone: (866) 787-0832 Fax: (617) 391-2701 E-mail: info@nichq.org Web Site: http://www.nichq.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Emotional development, Model programs, Parent professional relations, Pediatric care, Pediatrics, Quality improvement, Social development, Young children

Center on the Developing Child at Harvard University. 2020. How racism can affect child development. Cambridge, MA: Center on the Developing Child at Harvard University, 1 p.

Annotation: This infographic illustrates how children's stress response systems react to systemic racism and everyday discrimination to negatively affect their learning, behavior and physical and mental health.

Contact: Center on the Developing Child at Harvard University, 50 Church Street, Fourth Floor, Cambridge, MA 02138, Telephone: (617) 496-0578 E-mail: developingchild@harvard.edu Web Site: http://www.developingchild.harvard.edu Available from the website.

Keywords: Brain, Child development, Racial factors, Racism, Social factors

Nguyen US, Smith S, Granja MR. 2020. Young children in deep poverty: Racial/ethnic disparities and child wellbeing compared to other groups. New York, NY: National Center for Children in Poverty, 20 pp.

Annotation: This report presents analyses with data that highlight the needs of young children and families in deep poverty, along with updated recommendations. Topics covered include differences in health and development indicators across income groups, differences in family and community factors across income groups, and racial/ethnic disparities in young children's experience of deep poverty.

Contact: National Center for Children in Poverty, 215 West 125th Street, Third Floor, New York, NY 10027, Telephone: (646) 284-9600 Fax: (646) 284-9623 E-mail: info@nccp.org Web Site: http://www.nccp.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Child development, Child health, Ethnic factors, Poverty, Racial factors, Social factors, Statistics, Young children

Johnson K, Willis D, Doyle S. 2020. Guide to leveraging opportunities between Title V and Medicaid for promoting social-emotional development. Washington, DC: Center for the Study of Social Policy and Johnson Group Consulting, 100 pp. (matrix 21 pp.).

Annotation: This guide is designed to support state-level planning, action, and innovation aligned with the goals of the Pediatrics Supporting Parents initiative, using a framework that stretches from promotion to screening to prevention to early intervention and treatment. It covers the essential power of Title V and Medicaid partnership, promoting social-emotional development in pediatric primary care, state opportunities for using Title V and Medicaid/EPSDT to promote social-emotional development and mental health, learning from current state actions, and family engagement. It is accompanied by a matrix that provides charts of specific actions that Title V and Medicaid programs can take to achieve these goals.

Contact: Center for the Study of Social Policy, 1575 Eye Street, N.W., Suite 500, Washington, DC 20005, Telephone: (202) 371-1565 Fax: (202) 371-1472 E-mail: info@cssp.org Web Site: http://www.cssp.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Child development, Child health, EPSDT, Emotional development, Medicaid, Primary care, Social factors, Title V programs

National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Vibrant and healthy kids: Aligning science, practice, and policy to advance health equity. Washington, DC: National Academies Press, 597 pp. (Consensus study report)

Annotation: This report provides a brief overview of stressors that affect childhood development and health, a framework for applying current brain and development science to the real world, a roadmap for implementing tailored interventions, and recommendations about improving systems to better align with our understanding of the significant impact of health equity. It builds upon and updates research from Communities in Action: Pathways to Health Equity (2017) and From Neurons to Neighborhoods: The Science of Early Childhood Development (2000).

Contact: National Academies Press, 500 Fifth Street, N.W., Keck 360, Washington, DC 20001, Telephone: (202) 334-3313 Secondary Telephone: (888) 624-8373 Fax: (202) 334-2451 E-mail: customer_service@nap.edu Web Site: http://www.nap.edu Available from the website.

Keywords: Behavioral sciences, Early childhood development, Early childhood education, Health equity, Infants, Social sciences, Studies, Young children

O'Connor C. 2017. Working toward well-being: Community approaches to toxic stress. Washington, DC: Center for the Study of Social Policy, Early Childhood LINC Learning Lab on Community Approaches to Toxic Stress, 7 pp.

Annotation: This brief defines toxic stress from a community perspective and presents a framework for a community approach to addressing toxic stress, nested within the broader context of working toward healthy development and well-being. The brief also provides examples of how communities are taking action and recommendations for next steps to promote and further develop comprehensive approaches to toxic stress in communities across the country. Strategies for parents and caregivers; service providers; and multisystem, community partners and policymakers are included.

Contact: Center for the Study of Social Policy, 1575 Eye Street, N.W., Suite 500, Washington, DC 20005, Telephone: (202) 371-1565 Fax: (202) 371-1472 E-mail: info@cssp.org Web Site: http://www.cssp.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Advocacy, Child development, Child health, Communication, Communities, Community action, Community based services, Community role, Coordination, Early childhood, Families, Health education, Leadership, Models, Organizational change, Parents, Policy development, Protective factors, Social change, Stress, Systems development, Young children

Roche MK, Blank M, Jacobson R. 2017. Community schools: A whole-child framework for school improvement. Washington, DC: Institute for Educational Leadership, Coalition for Community Schools, 26 pp.

Annotation: This paper proposes community schools as a strategy for school improvement. Topics include what a community school looks like at the school level, how community schools support provisions in the Every Student Succeeds Act, and how states can support community schools. Information about community school and initiative exemplars, resources, and partners are included.

Contact: Institute for Educational Leadership, Coalition for Community Schools, 4301 Connecticut Avenue, N.W., Suite 100, Washington, DC 20008-2304, Telephone: (202) 822-8405 X111 Fax: (202) 872-4050 E-mail: ccs@iel.org Web Site: http://www.communityschools.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescents, Children, Coalitions, Collaboration, Community coordination, Community participation, Equal opportunities, Families, Learning, Models, Organizational change, Program improvement, Public private partnerships, Relationships, School districts, Schools, Service integration, Social support, Systems development

U.S. Maternal and Child Health Bureau. 2016. State application/annual report. [Rockville, MD]: U.S. Maternal and Child Health Bureau, multiple items.

Annotation: These applications/annual reports provide data on financial, program, and performance measures for state maternal and child health (MCH) programs. The reports also include a description of the status and activities of each program within the context of its data. Topics include the five-year needs assessment, state-selected priorities, linkage of state priorities to national and state performance and outcome measures, and five-year action plan. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: U.S. Maternal and Child Health Bureau, Health Resources and Services Administration, 5600 Fishers Lane, Rockville, MD 20857, Telephone: (301) 443-2170 Web Site: https://mchb.hrsa.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Applications, Community action, Financing, Goals, Measures, Needs assessment, Program descriptions, Program development, Program evaluation, Program planning, Social Security Act, State MCH programs, Statistical data, Title V

California Pan-Ethnic Health Network. 2016. Taking a bite out of oral health inequities: Promoting equitable oral health policies for communities of color. Oakland, CA: California Pan-Ethnic Health Network, 11 pp.

Annotation: This brief highlights oral health disparities within communities of color in California. Topics include oral health disparities and the impact of oral health inequities on communities of color, including oral health and children, oral health and employment, and oral health and chronic conditions. Also discussed are causes of oral health inequities, including lack of access to affordable care, absence of a culturally and linguistically competent work force, and social and environmental inequities. In addition, the brief provides policy recommendations (improving access to and quality of oral health care, ensuring that there is a culturally competent work force, and engaging in efforts to improve underlying socioeconomic inequities).

Contact: California Pan-Ethnic Health Network, 1221 Preservation Park Way, Suite 200, Oakland, CA 94612, Telephone: (510) 832-1160 Fax: (510) 832-1175 E-mail: info@cpehn.org Web Site: http://www.cpehn.org/ Available from the website.

Keywords: Access to health care, Barriers, California, Children, Chronic illnesses and disabilities, Environmental influences, Equal opportunities, Health care disparities, Health status disparities, Oral health, Policy development, Social factors, State surveys, Work force

Rivara F, Le Menestrel S, eds; National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine, Committee on the Biological and Psychosocial Effects of Peer Victimization: Lessons for Bullying Prevention. 2016. Preventing bullying through science, policy, and practice. Washington, DC: National Academies Press, 310 pp.

Annotation: This document reports on the state of the science on the biological and psychosocial consequences of peer victimization and the risk and protective factors that either increase or decrease peer victimization behavior and consequences. Contents include information about the scope of the problem, social contexts that can either attenuate or exacerbate the effect of individual characteristics on bullying behavior, consequences of bullying behavior, preventive interventions, law and policy, and future directions.

Contact: National Academies Press, 500 Fifth Street, N.W., Keck 360, Washington, DC 20001, Telephone: (202) 334-3313 Secondary Telephone: (888) 624-8373 Fax: (202) 334-2451 E-mail: customer_service@nap.edu Web Site: http://www.nap.edu Available from the website.

Keywords: Bullying, Peer groups, Peer pressure, Policy development, Protective factors, Risk factors, Social behavior, Violence prevention

Center for Global Policy Solutions. 2016. Overlooked but not forgotten: Social Security lifts millions more children out of poverty. Washington, DC: Center for Global Policy Solutions, 33 pp.

Annotation: This report presents findings from a study to expand existing research about Social Security's indirect role in lifting children out of poverty by examining the effect on those living in extended households. It documents how the multi-generational impact of Social Security has grown and how it has provided an important and increasing income source across different racial and ethnic groups. Policy implications are included.

Contact: Center for Global Policy Solutions, 1300 L Street, N.W., Suite 975, Washington, DC 20005, Telephone: (202) 265-5111 Fax: (202) 265-5118 E-mail: info@globalpolicysolutions.org Web Site: http://globalpolicysolutions.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Children, Ethnic factors, Family income, Federal programs, Intergenerational programs, Policy development. , Poverty, Racial factors, Social Security, Trends

Way N. 2016. The crisis of connection for adolescent boys. Washington, DC: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Office of Adolescent Health, 1 video. (34 min.). (TAG Talks video series)

Annotation: This video provides information about increasing isolation among adolescent males as they move from childhood to adolescence and how social connections affect health and well-being. The video encourages adults to rethink assumptions and provides strategies to encourage the friendships that help adolescent boys thrive. Supplemental materials, including a discussion guide for professionals and family members, are also available.

Contact: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Office of Adolescent Health, 1101 Wootton Parkway, Suite 700, Rockville, MD 20852, Telephone: (240) 453-2846 E-mail: oah.gov@hhs.gov Web Site: http://www.hhs.gov/ash/oah Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent health, Adolescent males, Psychosocial development, Social support

Coalition for Community Schools, Communities in Schools, Strive Together. 2016. Aligning networks to enable every student to thrive. Washington, DC: Institute for Educational Leadership, Coalition for Community Schools, 6 pp.

Annotation: This document describes progress toward educational equity and opportunities to achieve shared goals by aligning assets and expertise across networks, school districts, and communities. Contents include a unifying concept of student-centered education and five principles for driving the work. Topics include trusting relationships, cross-sector partnerships, purposeful engagement, actionable data, and shared accountability.

Contact: Institute for Educational Leadership, Coalition for Community Schools, 4301 Connecticut Avenue, N.W., Suite 100, Washington, DC 20008-2304, Telephone: (202) 822-8405 X111 Fax: (202) 872-4050 E-mail: ccs@iel.org Web Site: http://www.communityschools.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Accountability, Barriers, Collaboration, Community action, Data, Education, Equal opportunities, Ethnic groups, Networking, Policy development, Poverty, Public private partnerships, Race, Social support, Trust

Spencer A, Freda B, McGinnis T, Gottlieb L. 2016. Measuring social determinants of health among Medicaid beneficiaries: Early state lessons. Hamilton, NJ: Center for Health Care Strategies, 13 pp.

Annotation: This brief explores state-based efforts to collect and use social determinants of health (SDOH) data including what data health plans and providers are required to collect. Topics include early state efforts to define SDOH and collect information; state efforts to select SDOH measures; using SDOH data at the patient and population level; challenges to collecting, sharing, and using SDOH information; and considerations for advancing SDOH measurement approaches.

Contact: Center for Health Care Strategies, 200 American Metro Boulevard, Suite 119, Hamilton, NJ 08619, Telephone: (609) 528-8400 Fax: (609) 586-3679 Web Site: http://www.chcs.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Accountability, Data collection, Data linkage, Environmental exposure, Environmental influences, Financing, Health behavior, Low income groups, Measures, Medicaid, Model programs, Outcome and process assessment, Policy development, Reimbursement, Risk assessment, Risk factors, Service delivery systems, Social conditions, Socioeconomic factors, State programs

National Center for HIV/AIDS, Viral Hepatits, STD, and TB Prevention, Division of Adolescent and School Health. 2015–. Parent engagement in schools. Atlanta, GA: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, multiple items.

Annotation: These resources are designed to assist parents and school staff in working together to support and improve the learning, development, and health of children and adolescents. Contents include fact sheets for school districts and school administrators, teachers and other school staff, and parents and families. A strategy guide for state and local education agencies on selecting and implementing parent engagement strategies specific to HIV/STD prevention and a facilitator's guide for staff development are also included.

Contact: National Center for HIV/AIDS, Viral Hepatits, STD, and TB Prevention, Division of Adolescent and School Health, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 4770 Buford Highway, N.E., Mailstop K-29, Atlanta, GA 30341-3724, Telephone: 800-232-4636 Secondary Telephone: (888) 232-6348 E-mail: cdcinfo@cdc.gov Web Site: http://www.cdc.gov/healthyyouth Available from the website.

Keywords: Academic achievement, Adolescent development, Adolescent health, Child development, Child health, Family support, Health behavior, Learning, Parents, Protective factors, School age children, School districts, School personnel, Schools, Social support, Students, Teachers

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This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number U02MC31613, MCH Advanced Education Policy, $3.5 M. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.