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Strengthening the evidence for maternal and child health programs

Search Results: MCHLine

Items in this list may be obtained from the sources cited. Contact information reflects the most current data about the source that has been provided to the MCH Digital Library.


Displaying records 1 through 20 (74 total).

Rivara F, Le Menestrel S, eds; National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine, Committee on the Biological and Psychosocial Effects of Peer Victimization: Lessons for Bullying Prevention. 2016. Preventing bullying through science, policy, and practice. Washington, DC: National Academies Press, 310 pp.

Annotation: This document reports on the state of the science on the biological and psychosocial consequences of peer victimization and the risk and protective factors that either increase or decrease peer victimization behavior and consequences. Contents include information about the scope of the problem, social contexts that can either attenuate or exacerbate the effect of individual characteristics on bullying behavior, consequences of bullying behavior, preventive interventions, law and policy, and future directions.

Contact: National Academies Press, 500 Fifth Street, N.W., Keck 360, Washington, DC 20001, Telephone: (202) 334-3313 Secondary Telephone: (888) 624-8373 Fax: (202) 334-2451 E-mail: customer_service@nap.edu Web Site: http://www.nap.edu Available from the website.

Keywords: Bullying, Peer groups, Peer pressure, Policy development, Protective factors, Risk factors, Social behavior, Violence prevention

CDC Foundation. 2016. Health and well-being for all: Accelerating learning about social determinants [Meeting-in-a-box]. Atlanta, GA: CDC Foundation, multiple items.

Annotation: This tool is designed to help health and health care professionals at all stages of professional development explore the determinants underlying health problems faced by patients and communities. It simulates a 6-step process for leading change to improve the community's health. The tool incorporates a big-picture visual with supporting materials including data cards, group dialogue exercises, and facilitator tips to identify and engage collaborators in addressing asthma, obesity, and gang violence. It also includes tips on using the materials, resources for hosting an event, a fact sheet for sharing information about the tool, and a webinar describing it's use.

Contact: CDC Foundation, 600 Peachtree Street, N.E., Suite 1000, Atanta, GA 30308, Telephone: (404) 653-0790 Secondary Telephone: (888) 880-4CDC Fax: (404) 653-0330 Web Site: http;//www.cdcfoundation.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Asthma, Behavior change, Collaboration, Facilitated communication, Interpersonal violence, Learning, Obesity, Problem solving, Program improvement, Role playing, Social change, Training

University of North Dakota School of Medicine and Health Sciences, Center for Rural Health. 2016. Social factors affecting pediatric oral health in North Dakota. Grand Forks, ND: University of North Dakota School of Medicine and Health Sciences, Center for Rural Health, 2 pp.

Annotation: This fact sheet provides information about students' oral hygiene practices and consumption of sugar-containing beverages. It discusses third-grade students' access to toothbrushes, toothbrushing and flossing practices, and consumption of sugar-containing beverages, as well as whether they have visited a dentist; middle school students’ toothbrushing practices and consumption of sugar-containing beverages; and high school students’ consumption of soda.

Contact: University of North Dakota School of Medicine and Health Sciences, Center for Rural Health, 501 North Columbia Road Stop 9037, Grand Forks, ND 58202-9037, Telephone: (701) 777-3848 Fax: (701) 777-6779 E-mail: ruralhealth@med.und.edu Web Site: https://ruralhealth.und.edu Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescents, American Indians, Children, Dental caries, Health behavior, Low income groups, Minority groups, North Dakota, Nutrition, Oral health, Oral hygiene, Prevalence, Rural population, Social factors, State surveys, Statistical data, Sugar

Woolf SH, Aron L, Chapman DA, Dubay L, Zimerman E, Snellings LC, Hall L, Haley AD, Holla N, Ayers K, Lowenstein C, Waidmann TA. 2016. The health of the states: How U.S. states compare in health status and the factors that shape health–Summary report. Richmond, VA: Virginia Commonwealth University Center on Society and Health; Washington, DC: Urban Institute, 53 pp.

Annotation: This report, and accompanying supplemental reports, present findings on the status of Americans' health at the state level, along with the diverse factors associated with health. The report examines how state-level variations in health outcomes correlate with variations in factors thought to shape or influence health (health determinants) from five domains including health behaviors, health systems, economic and social factors, physical and social environmental factors, and public policies and social spending. Contents include research and policy priorities emerging from the analysis. Maps and charts are included.

Contact: Urban Institute, 2100 M Street, N.W., Washington, DC 20037, Telephone: (202) 833-7200 Fax: (202) 467-5775 E-mail: http://www.urban.org/about/contact.cfm Web Site: http://www.urban.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Data analysis, Decision making, Economics, Geographic factors, Health behaviors, Health status, Health systems, Life course, Protective factors, Public policy, Risk factors, Social factors

Spencer A, Freda B, McGinnis T, Gottlieb L. 2016. Measuring social determinants of health among Medicaid beneficiaries: Early state lessons. Hamilton, NJ: Center for Health Care Strategies, 13 pp.

Annotation: This brief explores state-based efforts to collect and use social determinants of health (SDOH) data including what data health plans and providers are required to collect. Topics include early state efforts to define SDOH and collect information; state efforts to select SDOH measures; using SDOH data at the patient and population level; challenges to collecting, sharing, and using SDOH information; and considerations for advancing SDOH measurement approaches.

Contact: Center for Health Care Strategies, 200 American Metro Boulevard, Suite 119, Hamilton, NJ 08619, Telephone: (609) 528-8400 Fax: (609) 586-3679 E-mail: Web Site: http://www.chcs.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Accountability, Data collection, Data linkage, Environmental exposure, Environmental influences, Financing, Health behavior, Low income groups, Measures, Medicaid, Model programs, Outcome and process assessment, Policy development, Reimbursement, Risk assessment, Risk factors, Service delivery systems, Social conditions, Socioeconomic factors, State programs

National Institutes of Health, Office of Behavioral and Social Sciences Research. 2016. Strategic plan 2017–2021. [Bethesda, MD]: National Institutes of Health, Office of Behavioral and Social Sciences Research, 49 pp.

Annotation: This document outlines a plan to coordinate and advance the health-relevant behavioral and social sciences (BSS) in the service of the nation's health. Contents include scientific priorities reflecting key research challenges and the foundational processes to enhance and support these priorities. Topics include communicating BSS research findings, coordinating BSS research programs and integrating BSS research within the larger research enterprise, training the next generation of BSS researchers, and evaluating the impact of BSS research and addressing scientific policies that support this research.

Contact: National Institutes of Health, Office of Behavioral and Social Sciences Research, Building 31, Room B1C19, 31 Center Drive, Bethesda, MD 20892, Telephone: (301) 402-1146 Fax: (301) 402-1150 Web Site: http://obssr.od.nih.gov Available from the website. Document Number: NIH Pub. No. 16-OD-8026.

Keywords: Federal programs, Health behavior, Research, Social sciences, Strategic plans

National Center for HIV/AIDS, Viral Hepatits, STD, and TB Prevention, Division of Adolescent and School Health. 2015–. Parent engagement. Atlanta, GA: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, multiple items.

Annotation: These resources are designed to assist parents and school staff in working together to support and improve the learning, development, and health of children and adolescents. Contents include fact sheets for school districts and school administrators, teachers and other school staff, and parents and families. A strategy guide for state and local education agencies on selecting and implementing parent engagement strategies specific to HIV/STD prevention and a facilitator's guide for staff development are also included.

Contact: National Center for HIV/AIDS, Viral Hepatits, STD, and TB Prevention, Division of Adolescent and School Health, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 4770 Buford Highway, N.E., Mailstop K-29, Atlanta, GA 30341-3724, Telephone: 800-232-4636 Secondary Telephone: (888) 232-6348 E-mail: cdcinfo@cdc.gov Web Site: http://www.cdc.gov/healthyyouth Available from the website.

Keywords: Academic achievement, Adolescent development, Adolescent health, Child development, Child health, Family support, Health behavior, Learning, Parents, Protective factors, School age children, School districts, School personnel, Schools, Social support, Students, Teachers

U.S. Office of Minority Health. 2015. Promoting healthy choices and community changes: An e-learning program for promotores de salud. Rockville, MD: U.S. Office of Minority Health, 1 v.

Annotation: This course for promotores de salud (community health workers) comprises four units about understanding healthy choices, helping people make healthy choices, understanding community change, and helping people make community change. The course can by used by individuals or by groups of individuals. Contents include a video introduction; quizzes; stories; examples; and handouts that summarize each unit including key points, definitions, and questions to consider and discuss. Users can choose to answer the questions at the end of each unit and print a certificate of completion or receive a certificate by email. The units can be completed in sequence or in any order and in whole or in part. The course is available in English and Spanish.

Contact: U.S. Office of Minority Health, The Tower Building, 1101 Wootton Parkway, Suite 600, Rockville, MD 20852, Telephone: (240) 453-2882 Secondary Telephone: (240) 453-2883 Fax: (240) 453-2883 E-mail: info@minorityhealth.hhs.gov Web Site: http://www.minorityhealth.hhs.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Community health workers, Decision making, Health behavior, Hispanic Americans, Social change, Spanish language materials, Training

Davis R. 2015. Measuring what works to achieve health equity: Metrics for the determinants of health (rev.). Oakland, CA: Prevention Institute, 45 pp., exec. summ. (8 pp.)

Annotation: This paper provides a framework for understanding how disparities in health outcomes are produced and how health equity can be achieved, particularly by addressing the determinants of health. The paper lays out the determinants of health (structural drivers; social-cultural, physical-built, and economic environment; and health care services) that must be improved to achieve health equity and describes the methods and criteria for identifying health equity metrics. Finally, the paper delineates a set of metrics that could reflect progress toward achieving health equity.

Contact: Prevention Institute, 221 Oak Street, Oakland, CA 94607, Telephone: (510) 444-7738 Fax: (510) 663-1280 E-mail: prevent@#preventioninstitute.org Web Site: http://www.preventioninstitute.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Behavior, Environmental exposure, Environmental influences, Equal opportunities, Health disparities, Measures, Models, Social conditions, Socioeconomic factors

Lorenzo SB. 2014. Emotional, behavioral, and mental health challenges in kids and teens: Resources for families (2nd ed., upd.). Washington, DC: National Center for Education in Maternal and Child Health, 1 p.

Annotation: This brief is designed to help families find mental health care, services, and support and websites about emotional, behavioral, and mental health challenges in kids and teens. A separate section presents websites about babies and young kids. Another lists websites for teens. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Center for Education in Maternal and Child Health, Georgetown University, Box 571272, Washington, DC 20057-1272, Telephone: (202) 784-9770 E-mail: mchgroup@georgetown.edu Web Site: https://www.ncemch.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescents, Affective disorders, Behavior development, Behavior disorders, Bibliographies, Children, Electronic publications, Emotional development, Family support services, Mental health, Psychological needs, Social behavior

Association for Prevention Teaching and Research. 2014. Public health learning modules: Using Healthy People 2020 to improve population health. Washington, DC: Association for Prevention Teaching and Research, 18 modules.

Annotation: These learning modules aim to encourage the use of Healthy People 2020 in health professions education. They describe current policy and program efforts that address Healthy People 2020 topic areas and explain how to use available data to evaluate progress towards Healthy People 2020 goals and objectives. The modules include lecture materials, class activities, supplemental learning resources, and additional tools for instructors. They cover such topics as the legal infrastructure of public health, social determinants of health, emergencies, tobacco and substance use, mental health, access to health services, healthcare associated infections, health information technology, obesity and access to food, teen drivers, using policy and best practices in MCH, providing services to the lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender population, oral health, public health infrastructure, and environmental health.

Contact: Association for Prevention Teaching and Research, 1001 Connecticut Avenue, N.W., Suite 610, Washington, DC 20036, Telephone: (202) 463-0550 Secondary Telephone: (866) 474-APTR (474-2787) Fax: (202) 463-0555 E-mail: info@aptrweb.org Web Site: http://www.aptrweb.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Access to health care, Emergencies, Environmental health, Health services delivery, Healthy People 2020, Infections, Legal issues, Mental health, Model programs, Motor vehicle safety, Oral health, Professional education, Program evaluation, Public health infrastructure, Social factors, Substance use behavior, Tobacco use, Training materials

Fox L, Veguilla M, Perez Binder D. 2014. Data decision-making and program-wide implementation of the Pyramid Model. Tampa, FL: Technical Assistance Center on Social Emotional Intervention for Young Children, 33 pp. (Roadmap to effective intervention practices; no. 7)

Annotation: This document provides guidance for programs on collecting and using data when implementing the Pyramid Model, a framework for promoting the social and emotional competence of all young children including children who have persistent challenging behavior. Contents include a list of tools that can be used to ensure implementation and intervention fidelity and to determine the supports needed by professionals, children, and families. The document briefly describes each tool and provides the measurement form or information for accessing the tool.

Contact: Technical Assistance Center on Social Emotional Intervention for Young Children, Louis de la Parte Florida Mental Health Institute, University of South Florida, 13301 North Bruce B. Downs Boulevard, MHC2-1134, Tampa, FL 33612-3807, Telephone: (813) 974-9803 E-mail: cureton@usf.edu Web Site: http://www.challengingbehavior.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Competence, Data analysis, Data collection, Decision making, Early intervention, Emotional development, Measures, Psychosocial development, Social behavior, Young children

Dunlap G, Smith BJ, Fox L, Blase K. 2014. Roadmap to statewide implementation of the Pyramid Model. Tampa, FL: Technical Assistance Center on Social Emotional Intervention for Young Children, 10 pp. (Roadmap to effective intervention practices; no. 6)

Annotation: This document provides a guide and suggested resources for statewide implementation of the Pyramid Model for Promoting Social Emotional Competence in Infants and Young Children. The document outlines key components of the model in the context of implementation stages (planning and installation, implementation, and scale-up and sustainability). Components include the state leadership team, master cadre for professional development, demonstration sites, behavior specialists, data and evaluation systems, and state benchmarks of quality. The document also describes measures and evaluation procedures that are tailored to the model. An accompanying document provides descriptions of the tools and how to use them.

Contact: Technical Assistance Center on Social Emotional Intervention for Young Children, Louis de la Parte Florida Mental Health Institute, University of South Florida, 13301 North Bruce B. Downs Boulevard, MHC2-1134, Tampa, FL 33612-3807, Telephone: (813) 974-9803 E-mail: cureton@usf.edu Web Site: http://www.challengingbehavior.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Competence, Early intervention, Emotional development, Model programs, Psychosocial development, Service delivery systems, Social behavior, Statewide planning, Systems development, Young children

Institute of Medicine, Committee on the Recommended Social and Behavioral Domains and Measures for Electronic Health Records. 2014. Capturing social and behavioral domains in electronic health records: Phase 1. Washington, DC: National Academies Press, 130 pp.

Cashman J, Linehan P, Purcell L, Rosser M, Schultz S, Skalski S. 2014. Leading by convening: A blueprint for authentic engagement. Alexandria, VA: National Association of State Directors of Special Education, 101 pp.

Annotation: This document outlines a strategy of partnership that builds connections and fosters authentic engagement through convening and shared leadership. Topics include building engagement, coalescing around issues, ensuring relevant participation, doing the work together, and meeting to co-create tools and learning activities. Tools and learning activities are included.

Contact: National Association of State Directors of Special Education, , 225 Reinekers Lane, Suite 420, Alexandria, VA 22314, Telephone: (703) 519-3800 Fax: (703) 519-3808 Web Site: http://www.nasdse.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Attitude change, Behavior change, Collaboration, Leadership, Public private partnerships, Relationships, Social learning, Trust

U.S. Maternal and Child Health Bureau. 2013. Women's health USA. Rockville, MD: U.S. Maternal and Child Health Bureau, annual.

Annotation: This report is a compilation of key health statistics from multiple federal sources that highlights trends and disparities in some of the most pressing health challenges facing women. New topics and indicators in 2013 include chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, fast food and sugar-sweetened beverage consumption, prediabetes, and patient-centered care. New special population pages feature data on the characteristics and health of women served by community health centers, immigrant women, and lesbian and bisexual women. The website also features individually downloadable figures, tables, and text for easy insertion into presentations and document. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: U.S. Maternal and Child Health Bureau, Health Resources and Services Administration, 5600 Fishers Lane, Rockville, MD 20857, Telephone: (301) 443-2170 Web Site: https://mchb.hrsa.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Health behavior, Health care utilization, Health status, Maternal health, Population surveillance, Social indicators, Statistical data, Women

Salud America! The Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF) Research Network to Prevent Obesity Among Latino Children. 2013. Salud America! . [San Antonio, TX]: Salud America! The Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF) Research Network to Prevent Obesity Among Latino Children,

Annotation: This web site describes a national online network of researchers, community group leaders, decision-makers, and members of the public to support healthy policy and environmental changes that can help reverse the Latino childhood obesity epidemic. It provides news, research, maps, videos, resources, and successful stories of change in Latino communities across the nation. Topics as they relate to Latino childhood obesity include promoting healthier food in choices in schools and neighborhoods, increasing access to local places and more opportunities to be active, decreasing unhealthy food and beverage advertising, and reducing consumption of sugary drinks.

Contact: Salud America!, University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, Institute for Health Promotion Research, 7411 John Smith, Suite 1000, San Antonio, TX 78229, Telephone: (210) 562-6500 Fax: (210) 562-6545 E-mail: saludamerica@uthscsa.edu Web Site: http://salud-america.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Child health, Children, Health behavior, Health promotion, Hispanic Americans, Nutrition, Obesity, Physical activity, Policy development, Social change, Weight management

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. 2012. Teen pregnancy and social media: The health communicator's social media toolkit. Atlanta, GA: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention,

Annotation: This website presents a social media tool to help promote adolescent pregnancy prevention efforts. The quick reference guide, which is intended as a companion piece to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's (CDC's) Social Media Toolkit for Health Communicators, highlights a number of social media tools with adolescent-pregnancy-prevention messages from CDC. The website provide badges and buttons that can be placed on websites; contact-syndication information; e-cards; text that can be pasted onto a Facebook page posted on Twitter; links to podcasts, public service announcements, and mobile web pages; and widgets.

Contact: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 1600 Clifton Road, Atlanta, GA 30329-4027, Telephone: (800) 232-4636 Secondary Telephone: (888) 232-6348 E-mail: cdcinfo@cdc.gov Web Site: http://www.cdc.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Social media, Adolescent attitudes, Adolescent behavior, Adolescent pregnancy, Adolescent sexuality, Health promotion, Prevention

Currie C, Zanotti C, Morgan A, Currie D, de Looze M, Roberts C, Samdal O, Smith ORF, Barnekow V, eds. 2012. Social determinants of health and well-being among young people. Copenhagen, Denmark: World Health Organization, Regional Office for Europe, 272 pp. (Health policy for children and adolescents, no. 6)

Annotation: This report focuses on the social context of young people's health and describes the health and well-being of young people growing up in different countries across Europe and North America through data collected from the 2009-2010 Health Behavior in School-Aged Children Survey (HBSC). Contents include key data on social context, health outcomes, health behaviors, risk behaviors, age, gender, and family influence. The methodology for the 2009-2010 HBSC and supplementary data tables are provided in the appendix. The charts and maps published in the report can also be downloaded separately from the website.

Contact: World Health Organization, 20, Avenue Appia, Geneva, Switzerland , Telephone: (+ 41 22) 791 21 11 Fax: (+ 41 22) 791 3111 E-mail: info@who.int Web Site: http://www.who.int/en Available from the website.

Keywords: Data, Health behavior, Health status, International health, Risk taking, School age children, School health surveys, Social factors

Benson PL, Scales PC, Leffert N, Roehlkepartain EC. 2011. A fragile foundation: The state of developmental assets among American youth (2nd ed.). Minneapolis, MN: Search Institute, 153 pp.

Annotation: This report examines the status of adolescents in terms of developmental assets. The findings are based on data from a survey—"Search Institute Profiles of Student Life: Attitudes and Behaviors"—that measures 40 developmental assets, or positive factors. The document provides information about the following: the background assets and the young people surveyed; young people's experiences of developmental assets; the deficits and patterns of high risk behavior that compromise young people's healthy development; the power of assets in relation to risky behaviors; an overall goal for well-being; and creative tensions that address challenges and opportunities of the report. Each chapter includes text, figures, and tables of data by grade and gender. Appendices offer additional details of other demographic differences.

Contact: Search Institute, The Banks Building, 615 First Avenue N.E., Suite 125, Minneapolis, MN 55413, Telephone: (612) 376-8955 Secondary Telephone: (800) 888-7828 Contact Phone: (800) 888-7828 Fax: (612) 376-8956 E-mail: si@search-institute.org Contact E-mail: search@search-institute.org Web Site: http://www.search-institute.org/ Available in libraries. Document Number: No. 0352.

Keywords: Adolescent attitudes, Adolescent behavior, Adolescent development, Community role, Cultural factors, Decision making, Education, Families, High risk adolescents, Parent child relationships, Peer groups, Positivism, School role, Self-esteem, Social interaction, Statistics

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This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number U02MC31613, MCH Advanced Education Policy, $3.5 M. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.