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Strengthen the Evidence for Maternal and Child Health Programs

Search Results: MCHLine

Items in this list may be obtained from the sources cited. Contact information reflects the most current data about the source that has been provided to the MCH Digital Library.


Displaying records 1 through 8 (8 total).

Rosenbach M, Ellwood M, Czajka J, Irvin C, Coupe W, Quinn B. 2001. Implementation of the State Children's Health Insurance Program: Momentum is increasing after a modest start—First annual report. Cambridge, MA: Mathematica Policy Research, 101 pp.

Cornell EV. 2001. Maternal and child health (MCH) update: States have expanded eligibility and increased access to health care for pregnant women and children. Washington, DC: National Governors' Association Center for Best Practices, Health Policy Studies Division, 20 pp. (Issue brief)

Annotation: This issue brief discusses the methods states are using to increase access to health care for pregnant women and children by taking advantage of the flexibility under Title XXI of the Social Security Act to expand eligibility for Medicaid and SCHIP to uninsured low-income children. States are also finding ways to fund health care for low-income pregnant women. Tables describing Medicaid birth rates, eligibility levels, and steps taken by the states and territories to increase access to health care are included. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Governors Association, Center for Best Practices, Hall of the States, 444 North Capitol Street, Suite 267, Washington, DC 20001-1512, Telephone: (202) 624-5300 Contact Phone: (202) 624-7879 Fax: (202) 624-5313 E-mail: webmaster@nga.org Contact E-mail: ecornell@nga.org Web Site: http://www.nga.org/cms/center Available from the website.

Keywords: Access to health care, Child health, Health insurance, Medicaid, Social Security Act, Title XXI, State Children's Health Insurance Program, State MCH programs, Statistics, Women's health

U.S. Maternal and Child Health Bureau. 1999 (ca.). Relationship between the Children's Health Insurance Program and the Maternal and Child Health Block Program: Report to Congress. Rockville, MD: U.S. Maternal and Child Health Bureau, 31 pp.

Fox-Grage W, King M, Gehshan S, Starr J, Bradley C. 1999. CHIP and children with special health care needs. Washington, DC: National Conference of State Legislatures, 47 pp.

Annotation: This report provides background information about children with special health care needs (CSHN) and describes states' options for addressing those needs under the State Children's Health Insurance Program (CHIP). To assist state legislators who want to use the flexibility of Title XXI to improve services for CSHN, the report describes the following strategies: providing supplemental benefits; arranging for specialists to be included under the CHIP plan; expanding eligibility criteria to assist additional families; defining "medical necessity" more broadly; modifying cost-sharing requirements; and addressing quality assurance issues. Appendices include details about programs in Connecticut, Florida, and North Carolina; public health care programs for low income children; and lists of state and national contacts. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Conference of State Legislatures, 7700 East First Place, Denver, CO 80230, Telephone: (303) 364-7700 Fax: (303) 364-7800 Web Site: http://www.ncsl.org Available in libraries. Document Number: ISBN 1-58024-074-7.

Keywords: Children with special health care needs, Connecticut, Florida, Low income groups, Model programs, North Carolina, Public health services, Reports, Social Security Act, Title XXI, State CSHCN programs, State Children's Health Insurance Program, State legislatures

Brindis C, Kirkpatrick R, Macdonald T, VanLandeghem K, Lee S. 1999. Adolescents and the State Children's Health Insurance Program (CHIP): Healthy options for meeting the needs of adolescents. Washington, DC: Association of Maternal and Child Health Programs; San Francisco, CA: University of California, San Francisco, Policy Information and Analysis Center for Middle Childhood and Adolescence and National Adolescent Health Information Center, 88 pp.

Annotation: This publication summarizes key findings and themes from interviews about the Children's Health Insurance Program (CHIP) conducted in 1998 in 12 states: Alabama, California, Colorado, Connecticut, Florida, Illinois, New Mexico, New York, North Carolina, Massachusetts, Utah, and Wisconsin. Findings from the interviews are divided into nine sections, each dealing with major issues for adolescents under CHIP. These sections are benefit packages, outreach and enrollment, assuring access to care, confidentiality, adolescents with special needs, school-based/school-linked health centers, quality assurance, evaluation, and linkages to other health and social service programs. Appendices include names and titles of interview respondents, respondents priority issues for adolescence, summary of CHIP programs/plans for surveyed states, and resources on CHIP and adolescents. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Keywords: Access to health care, Adolescent health, Adolescents, Adolescents with special health care needs, Alabama, California, Children, Colorado, Confidentiality, Connecticut, Florida, Illinois, Interviews, Massachusetts, New Mexico, New York, North Carolina, Outreach, Reports, School linked programs, Social Security Act, Title XXI, State health insurance programs, Title V programs, Utah, Wisconsin

Ullman F, Bruen B, Holahan J. 1998. The State Children's Health Insurance Program: A look at the numbers. Washington, DC: Urban Institute, 22 pp. (Occasional paper; no. 4)

Annotation: This analysis of the State Children's Health Insurance Program (SCHIP) gauges the capacity of states to provide health insurance for low-income children, given the initial allocation of federal funds. The authors demonstrate some of the problems with the design of SCHIP. The distribution of federal funds among states is examined and compared. The contents include a program overview, guidelines for new state programs and Medicaid expansion, avoiding substitution and crowd-out, distribution of SCHIP funds, dollars available and child populations, states' capacity to provide new coverage, and estimating potential coverage.

Contact: Urban Institute, 2100 M Street, N.W., Washington, DC 20037, Telephone: (202) 833-7200 Contact Phone: (202) 833-7200 Fax: (202) 467-5775 E-mail: http://www.urban.org/about/contact.cfm Contact E-mail: paffairs@ui.urban.org Web Site: http://www.urban.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Federal health insurance programs, Federal legislation, Health insurance, Low income groups, Social Security Act, Title XXI, State Children's Health Insurance Program, State MCH programs

National Governors' Association Center for Best Practices, Health Policy Studies Division. 1998. How states can increase enrollment in the State Children's Health Insurance Program. Washington, DC: National Governors' Association Center for Best Practices, Health Policy Studies Division, 17 pp. (Issue brief)

Annotation: This issue brief examines the outreach and enrollment opportunities as well as the challenges facing governors and state health policymakers as they implement the State Children's Health Insurance Program (SCHIP). The requirements of the SCHIP legislation for outreach activities are outlined, funding and assistance for designing outreach activities at the state and national levels are identified, state administrative efforts to streamline enrollment are described, and outreach campaigns for health assistance and promotion are profiled. The issue brief also identifies the unique outreach and enrollment challenges related to children with special health care needs and immigrant children. An appendix highlights the best outreach and enrollment practices of three states. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Governors Association, Center for Best Practices, Hall of the States, 444 North Capitol Street, Suite 267, Washington, DC 20001-1512, Telephone: (202) 624-5300 Fax: (202) 624-5313 E-mail: webmaster@nga.org Web Site: http://www.nga.org/cms/center Available from the website.

Keywords: Children with special health care needs, Enrollment, Federal legislation, Health insurance, Immigrants, Outreach, Social Security Act, Title XXI, State Children's Health Insurance Program, State MCH programs

Association of State and Territorial Health Officials. 199?-. ASTHO access brief. Washington, DC: Association of State and Territorial Health Officials, irregular.

Annotation: These access briefs are part of a series that analyzes and synthesizes prevailing issues in three areas: children's health insurance implementation, maternal and child health, and for-profit conversions. Number 2, which deals with children's health insurance, discusses resources on innovative school-related programs. Number 4 is an outreach and enrollment overview. Number 5 discusses outstationed eligibility workers and innovative programs. Number 6 discusses minimizing welfare stigma and facilitating enrollment. Number 7 discusses ensuring access and developing the capacity of primary care systems. Number 8 discusses quality and performance measurement. On for-profit conversions, the August 1998 issue provides examples of activities of public health–related foundations.

Contact: Association of State and Territorial Health Officials, 2231 Crystal Drive, Suite 450, Arlington, VA 22202, Telephone: (202) 371-9090 Fax: (571) 527-3189 Web Site: http://www.astho.org Available at no charge.

Keywords: Enrollment, Outreach, Social Security Act, Title XXI, Social workers, State Children's Health Insurance Program

   

This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number U02MC31613, MCH Advanced Education Policy, $3.5 M. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.