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Strengthening the evidence for maternal and child health programs

Search Results: MCHLine

Items in this list may be obtained from the sources cited. Contact information reflects the most current data about the source that has been provided to the MCH Digital Library.


Displaying records 1 through 20 (54 total).

U.S. Office of the Surgeon General. 2020. Smoking cessation: A report of the Surgeon General. Rockville, MD: U.S. Office of the Surgeon General, 675 pp. (exec. summ. 15 pp.).

Annotation: This Surgeon General’s report examines the effectiveness of various smoking cessation tools and resources; reviews the health effects of smoking and catalogues the improvements to health that can occur when smokers quit; highlights important new data on populations in which the prevalence of smoking is high and quit rates are low; and identifies gaps in the availability and utilization of programs, policies, and resources that can improve cessation rates and help smokers quit.

Contact: U.S. Office of the Surgeon General, Tower Building, Plaza Level 1, Room 100, 1101 Wootton Parkway, Rockville, MD 20852, Telephone: (240) 276-8853 Fax: (240) 453-6141 Web Site: http://www.surgeongeneral.gov/index.html Available from the website.

Keywords: Federal initiatives, Health behavior, Passive smoking, Research, Risk taking, Smoking, Smoking cessation, Smoking during pregnancy, Tobacco use

Le LT, Brady R, Sun BD, Perry DF, Richards J. 2020. Strengthen the evidence for maternal and child health programs: National performance measure 14.1 smoking in pregnancy evidence review. Washington, DC: National Center for Education in Maternal and Child Health, Strengthen the Evidence for MCH Programs, 108 pp. (brief 8 pp.).

Annotation: This evidence review looks at evidence-based and evidence-informed strategies that MCH Block Grant programs can implement to support smoking cessation in pregnancy. Contents include an introduction and background; review methods and results, including search results, characteristics of studies reviewed, intervention components, summary of study results, and evidence rating and evidence continuum; and implications of the review. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: Strengthen the Evidence for MCH Programs, National Center for Education in Maternal and Child Health, Web Site: https://www.mchevidence.org/ Available from the website.

Keywords: Block grants, Evidence-based practice, Literature reviews, Measures, Model programs, Policy development, Pregnant women, Program planning, Resources for professionals, Smoking during pregnancy, State MCH programs, Title V programs, Tobacco use

Smiles for Children. 2017. Smoking and pregnancy. Richmond, VA: Virginia Department of Health, 2 pp.

Annotation: of smoking during pregnancy. It lists health problems for both pregnant women and their infants that smoking during pregnancy are linked to. The brochure also discusses the link between smoking and gum disease and provides information about the benefits of quitting smoking either before or during pregnancy. In addition, the brochure explains the importance of receiving regular oral health care and how to find a dental home. The brochure is written in simple language, with English on one side and Spanish on the other.

Contact: Virginia Department of Health, P.O. Box 2448, Richmond, VA 23218, Telephone: (804) 864-7000 E-mail: questions@vdh.virginia.gov Web Site: https://www.vdh.virginia.gov/ Available from the website.

Keywords: Spanish language materials, Consumer education materials, Infant health, Low literacy materials, Non English language materials, Oral health, Pregnant women, Smoking cessation, Smoking during pregnancy

Vanderbilt Evidence Based Practice Center. 2014. Smoking cessation interventions in pregnancy and postpartum care. Rockville, MD: U.S. Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, 88 pp., exec. summ. (12 pp.). (Evidence report/technology assessment; no. 214)

Society for Public Health Education. [2013]. Smoking Cessation and Reduction in Pregnancy Treatment (SCRIPT®). Washington, DC: Society for Public Health Education,

Annotation: These resources are designed to assist health professionals in help pregnant women quit smoking. Program components include a guide that outlines a self-evaluation process to help build women's smoking cessation success over a seven-day period, a DVD that provides testimonials from pregnant smokers and demonstrates behavioral skills to quit smoking, comprehensive counseling to help pregnant smokers quit or significantly reduce smoking during pregnancy, and counseling and encouragement to establish a non-smoking home. The website also provides information about a one-day workshop designed to train health professionals to promote, implement, and evaluate SCRIPT® as part of routine prenatal care.

Contact: Society for Public Health Education, 10 G Street, N.E., Suite 605, Washington, DC 20002, Telephone: (202) 408-9804 Fax: (202) 408-9815 E-mail: info@sophe.org Web Site: http://www.sophe.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Health education, Model programs, Pregnant women, Prenatal care, Program descriptions, Smoking cessation, Smoking during pregnancy, Training

Ohio Department of Health. (2013). Preventing infant mortality. [Columbus, OH]: Ohio Department of Health, 5 pp.

Annotation: This fact sheet focuses on efforts to prevent infant mortality in Ohio. It provides information about the Ohio Department of Health's (ODH's) safe sleep campaign, its progesterone prematurity project, its prenatal smoking-cessation initiative, and its decision to add severe combined immune deficiency and critical congenital heart disease to its list of newborn screening items. ODH's project to reduce elective deliveries before 39 weeks' gestation, its institute for equity in birth outcomes, and its support for select communities to participate in an initiative to improve black infant mortality and prematurity rates are also discussed.

Contact: Ohio Department of Health, 246 North High Street, Columbus, OH 43215, Telephone: (614) 466-3543 Web Site: http://www.odh.ohio.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Blacks, Infant death, Infant mortality, Neonatal screening, Ohio, Prematurity, Prenatal care, Preterm birth, Prevention services, Public awareness campaigns, Safety, Sleep position, Smoking cessation, Smoking during pregnancy, State initiatives

Association of State and Territorial Health Officials. 2013. Smoking cessation strategies for women before, during, and after pregnancy: Recommendations for state and territorial health agencies. Arlington, VA: Association of State and Territorial Health Officials, 16 pp.

Annotation: This document explores a coordinated health systems approach to long-term cessation outcomes for women. The issue brief contains eight recommendations; key resources; and examples from states including Alabama, California, Colorado, Massachusetts, Michigan, New York, North Carolina, Oklahoma, and Utah. Topics include training and technical assistance to health professionals, quitline services, coordinated media campaigns, customized programs, points of intervention, cessation benefits in health plans, service integration, and tobacco-control policies that augment tobacco cessation for women.

Contact: Association of State and Territorial Health Officials, 2231 Crystal Drive, Suite 450, Arlington, VA 22202, Telephone: (202) 371-9090 Fax: (571) 527-3189 Web Site: http://www.astho.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Case studies, Pregnant women, Smoking cessation, Smoking during pregnancy, State initiatives, Tobacco use, Women's health

Mocan N, Raschke C, Unel B. 2013. The impact of mothers' earnings on health inputs and infant health. National Bureau of Economic Research, 54 pp. (NBER working paper series no. 19434)

Annotation: This paper investigates the impact of mothers’ earnings on birth weight and gestational age of infants. It also analyzes the impact of earnings on mothers’ consumption of prenatal medical care, and their propensity to smoke and drink during pregnancy. Study methodology and findings are described.

Contact: National Bureau of Economic Research, 1050 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, MA 02138-5398, Telephone: (617) 868-3900 Fax: (617) 868-2742 E-mail: info@nber.org Web Site: http://www.nber.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Alcohol use during pregnancy, Pregnancy outcome, Pregnant women, Prenatal care, Smoking during pregnancy, Socioeconomic factors, Working mothers

U.S. Maternal and Child Health Bureau. 2012. Smoking cessation during pregnancy: Healthy Start and the SCRIPT Program. [Rockville, MD]: U.S. Maternal and Child Health Bureau, 1 video (90 min.).

Annotation: This webcast provides background information about the Healthy Start Program, which works to expand the availability and accessibility of prenatal care in communities with higher-than-average infant mortality rates, and the SCRIPT program, which helps pregnant women quit smoking. The purpose of the webinar is to discuss how the SCRIPT program can be implemented in Healthy Start to reduce smoking rates during pregnancy.

Contact: U.S. Maternal and Child Health Bureau, Health Resources and Services Administration, 5600 Fishers Lane, Rockville, MD 20857, Telephone: (301) 443-2170 Web Site: https://mchb.hrsa.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Access to health care, Federal programs, Healthy Start, Pregnant women, Prenatal care, Smoking cessation, Smoking during pregnancy

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. 2012. Public health approaches to reducing U.S. infant mortality. Atlanta, GA: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 1 video (60 min.). (Public health grand rounds)

Annotation: This 60-minute webcast explores public health approaches to reducing U.S. infant mortality. Topics include addressing racial disparities that still persist, especially in the African American and American Indian/Alaska Native populations, and preventable infant deaths continue to occur. Approaches discussed include addressing the social, behavioral, and health risk factors that affect birth outcomes, such as preterm birth, unsafe sleeping environments for infants, and tobacco smoke.

Contact: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 1600 Clifton Road, Atlanta, GA 30329-4027, Telephone: (800) 232-4636 Secondary Telephone: (888) 232-6348 E-mail: cdcinfo@cdc.gov Web Site: http://www.cdc.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Audiovisual materials, Child death review, Infant death, Infant mortality, Neonatal death, Prematurity, Preterm birth, Research, Risk factors, SIDS, Sleep position, Smoking during pregnancy, Statistical data, Tobacco use

Henderson J. 2011, 2016 upd.. Smoking cessation for pregnancy and beyond: A virtual clinic (upd.). Hanover, NH: Trustees of Dartmouth College; Grantham, NH: Interactive Media Laboratory, World Two Systems LLC, multiple items.

Annotation: This training is designed to help health professionals counsel individuals of childbearing age to quit smoking, particularly pregnant women. Topics include the 5 A's intervention, a best practice approach for smoking cessation. Contents include interactive case simulations and discussions of the simulated visits, lectures on relevant topics from experts such as former Surgeon General Dr. C. Everett Koop, interviews with individuals who have quit, and links to web-based resources. A lecture on e-cigarettes is included.

Contact: Dartmouth Medical School, Interactive Media Laboratory, Colburn Hill, Suite 204, One Medical Center Drive, Lebanon, NH 03756, Telephone: (603)653-1500 Fax: (603)653-1515 E-mail: info@iml.dartmouth.edu Web Site: http://iml.dartmouth.edu Available from the website.

Keywords: Case studies, Continuing education materials, Reproductive health, Resource materials, Smoking cessation, Smoking during pregnancy, Training

Washington State Department of Health and Department of Social and Health Services. 2011. Key indicators of perinatal health for Washington residents. [Olympia, WA]: Washington State Department of Health, 25 pp.

Annotation: This document provides key information to identify perinatal health issues and help guide decision-making by the Washington State Department of Health and the Department of Social and Health Services. The indicators were derived from Washington State birth, fetal death, and death certificate data, the First Steps Database, and the Pregnancy Risk Assessment Monitoring System. The report includes highlights, a list of areas of concern, and series of key indicator tables. A list of sources is included.

Contact: Washington State Department of Health, Office of Maternal and Child Health, Assessment Unit, P.O. Box 47835, Olympia, WA 98504-7835, Telephone: (360) 236-3533 E-mail: mchassess.support@doh.wa.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Breastfeeding, Cesarean section, Infant health, Infant mortality, Low birthweight, Medicaid, Perinatal health, Pregnancy, Smoking during pregnancy, Statistics, Washington, Women's health

American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists. 2011. Smoking cessation during pregnancy: A clinician's guide to helping pregnant women quit smoking. Washington, DC: American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists, 33 pp.

Annotation: This document comprises an educational program that provides the background and tools necessary for clinicians to implement an effective behavioral intervention to help their patient quit smoking. Topics covered include continuing medical education (CME) information; an introduction to the program, evidence-based guidelines, a quick-reference guide, steps to implementation, and postpartum relapse. CME credits are available for those who complete the program.

Contact: American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists, 409 12th Street S.W., P.O. Box 96920, Washington, DC 20090-6920, Telephone: (202) 638-5577 Secondary Telephone: (202) 863-2518 E-mail: resources@acog.org Web Site: http://www.acog.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Behavior, Educational programs, Infant health, Intervention, Postpartum women, Pregnant women, Smoking cessation, Smoking during pregnancy, Women's health

March of Dimes Birth Defects Foundation. 2010. Smoking during pregnancy. White Plains, NY: March of Dimes ,

Annotation: This fact sheet provides information about smoking during pregnancy, how it affects the developing baby, the affect of secondhand and thirdhand smoke, and provides reasons and tips for quitting smoking.

Contact: March of Dimes, 1275 Mamaroneck Avenue, White Plains, NY 10605, Telephone: (914) 997-4488 Secondary Telephone: Web Site: http://www.marchofdimes.com Available from the website.

Keywords: Research, Child health, Infant health, Smoking cessation, Smoking during pregnancy, Women's health

Alletto MM, Fraser M, Ewig B. 2009. The power of prevention for mothers and children: The cost effectiveness of maternal and child health interventions. Washington, DC: Association of Maternal and Child Health Programs, 9 pp.

Annotation: This brief summarizes effective and efficient interventions provided by state maternal and child health (MCH) programs to improve the lives of mothers, children, and families, and that merit increased national investment. Topics include the Title V MCH Block Grant program; improving birth outcomes and maternal health; breastfeeding promotion; smoking cessation for pregnant women and mothers; newborn screening; ensuring childhood immunizations; Early and Periodic Screening, Diagnosis, and Treatment (EPSDT) for all children; early childhood programs; children's access to a medical home; preventing childhood injury; promoting adolescent health; adolescent pregnancy prevention and family planning services; and screening and treatment of sexually transmitted infections.

Contact: Association of Maternal and Child Health Programs, 1825 K Street, N.W., Suite 250, Washington, DC 20006-1202, Telephone: (202) 775-0436 Fax: (202) 478-5120 E-mail: info@amchp.org Web Site: http://www.amchp.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent health, Breastfeeding promotion, Child health, Cost effectiveness, EPSDT, Families, Immunization, Injury prevention, Maternal health, Medical home, Neonatal screening, Pregnancy outcome, Pregnant women, Prevention services, Preventive health services, Sexually transmitted diseases, Smoking cessation, Smoking during pregnancy

Joyce TJ, Racine AD, Yunzal-Butler C. 2009. Maternal smoking and the timing of WIC enrollment. Cambridge, MA: National Bureau of Economic Research, 38 pp. (NBER working paper series no. 14728)

Annotation: This paper investigates the association between the timing of enrollment in WIC and smoking among prenatal WIC participants across ethnicity and socioeconomic status. Data comes from Pregnancy Nutrition Surveillance System interviews taken from WIC participants in eight states.

Contact: National Bureau of Economic Research, 1050 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, MA 02138-5398, Telephone: (617) 868-3900 Fax: (617) 868-2742 E-mail: info@nber.org Web Site: http://www.nber.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Data, Maternal health, Smoking cessation, Smoking during pregnancy, WIC program

Cernech B. 2009. Project WIN (Welcoming Infants Into Neighborhoods): Final report. Omaha, NE: Visiting Nurse Association, 19 pp.

Annotation: This final report focuses on Project WIN, a project whose purpose was to close gaps related to prenatal health, infant health, and safety in Omaha County and Douglas County in Omaha, Nebraska. The report discusses the project purpose; goals and objectives; methodology; evaluation; results, outcomes, and lessons learned; publications and products; dissemination and utilization of results; and sustainability. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: Maternal and Child Health Library at Georgetown University, Telephone: (202) 784-9770 E-mail: mchgroup@georgetown.edu Web Site: https://www.mchlibrary.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Breastfeeding, Cultural competence, Families, Final reports, High risk groups, Home visiting, Infant health, Low income groups, Nebraska, Parenting skills, Pregnant women, Prenatal care, Prevention, Programs, Safety, Smoking during pregnancy, Woman's health

Tong VT, Jones JR, Dietz PM, D'Angelo JM. 2009. Trends in smoking before, during, and after pregnancy -- Pregnancy Risk Assessment Monitoring Systems (PRAMS), United States, 31 sites, 2000-2005. MMWR Surveillance Summaries 58(SS04):1-29,

Annotation: This report provides data on trends in smoking before, during, and after pregnancy and describes characteristics of female smokers in the United States during the period from 2000-2005. The data comes from the Pregnancy Risk Assessment Monitoring System (PRAMS) -- the surveillance project of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and state health departments that collects state-specific, population-based data on maternal attitudes and experiences before, during, and shortly after pregnancy. Data from 31 different state PRAM sites -- all of which met the Healthy People 2010 objective of increasing the percentage of pregnant smokers who stop smoking during pregnancy to 30% -- were included in the report. Included are guidelines for states and health care providers to help reduce smoking before, during, and after pregnancy through sustained and comprehensive tobacco control efforts and smoking cessation interventions. Figures illustrate the prevalence of smoking in various states across the country, including breakdowns by maternal race/ethnicity, year, and maternal age. The figures also show how many women relapsed after delivery. Separate tables display state-specific characteristics of the PRAMS survey samples.

Contact: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 1600 Clifton Road, Atlanta, GA 30329-4027, Telephone: (800) 232-4636 Secondary Telephone: (888) 232-6348 E-mail: cdcinfo@cdc.gov Web Site: http://www.cdc.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: , Data, Federal programs, Population surveillance, Pregnant women, Smoking cessation, Smoking during pregnancy, Tobacco use, Trends

CItyMatCH and National Association of County and City Health Officials . 2008. Prevention of tobacco use and secondhand smoke exposure before, during, and after pregnancy. Washington, DC: National Association of County and City Health Officials ,

Annotation: This site provides access to a June 19, 2008 webcast that highlights national, state, and local initiatives that address tobacco use and exposure and the health of MCH populations. Systems level approaches to smoking cessation among pregnant and parenting women, as well as the connection between environmental tobacco smoke and infant health were discussed. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Association of County and City Health Officials, 1100 17th Street, N.W., Seventh Floor, Washington, DC 20036, Telephone: (202) 783-5550 Fax: (202) 783-1583 E-mail: info@naccho.org Web Site: http://www.naccho.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Child health, Environmental exposure, Infant health, Local initiatives, National initiatives, Passive smoking, Pregnant women, Prenatal care, Prevention, Smoking cessation, Smoking during pregnancy, State initiatives, Tobacco use

North Carolina Healthy Start Foundation, First Step and North Carolina Public Health. 2008. Oh baby!: We want to keep you safe from secondhand smoke—Take the first step for your baby. Raliegh, NC: North Carolina Healthy Start Foundation, First Step, 16 pp.

Annotation: This brochure for parents provides information about how to protect infants from secondhand smoke. The brochure explains why secondhand and thirdhand smoke are harmful and provides tips for avoiding secondhand smoke during pregnacy and after the infant is born. Action plans for avoiding secondhand smoke are provided, and resources for help with quitting smoking and avoiding secondhand smoke are included.

Contact: North Carolina Healthy Start Foundation, 1300 St. Mary's Street, Suite 204, Raleigh, NC 27605, Telephone: (919) 828-1819 Fax: (919) 828-1446 E-mail: Janice@nchealthystart.org Web Site: http://www.NCHealthyStart.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Consumer education materials, Infant health, Passive smoking, Smoking, Smoking cessation, Smoking during pregnancy

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This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number U02MC31613, MCH Advanced Education Policy, $3.5 M. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.