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Strengthening the evidence for maternal and child health programs

Search Results: MCHLine

Items in this list may be obtained from the sources cited. Contact information reflects the most current data about the source that has been provided to the MCH Digital Library.


Displaying records 1 through 7 (7 total).

University of Alabama at Birmingham Pediatric Pulmonary Center, University of Arizona Pediatric Pulmonary Center, University of Florida Pediatric Pulmonary Center, University of New Mexico Pediatric Pulmonary Center, University of Washington Pediatric Pulmonary Center, and University of Wisconsin Pediatric Pulmonary Center. 2018. Pediatric sleep education. Madison, WI: University of Wisconsin-Madison, DoIT Academic Technology, 6 modules.

Annotation: These online, self-directed, training modules on the care of children with sleep disorders include an introduction/background, interactive case scenarios and resources & tools. Users first learn about each condition and the role of interdisciplinary team members in the comprehensive care of children with this condition. They then indicate how they would proceed with screening, diagnosis, treatment and/or referral. Expert insights and feedback are provided on the options chosen. The modules cover introduction to sleep health; pediatric insomnia; sleep disordered breathing; parasomnias; hypersomnolence disorder; and movement disorders. CME credit information is included.

Contact: U.S. Maternal and Child Health Bureau, Pediatric Pulmonary Centers, Web Site: https://ppc.mchtraining.net/ Available from the website.

Keywords: Children, Resources for professionals, Sleep disorders, Training materials

Horky SC, Lorenzo SB, Wagner MH. 2014. Sleep in babies, kids, teens, and pregnant women: Family resource brief (upd.). Washington, DC: National Center for Education in Maternal and Child Health, 1 p.

Annotation: This brief is designed to help families find sleep centers and specialists and websites about sleep and sleep problems in babies, kids, teens, and pregnant women. A separate section lists websites for teens. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Center for Education in Maternal and Child Health, Georgetown University, Telephone: (202) 784-9770 E-mail: mchgroup@georgetown.edu Web Site: https://www.ncemch.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescents, Bibliographies, Electronic publications, Families, Infants, Pregnant women, Sleep, Sleep disorders, Young children

Moon R, ed. 2013. Sleep: What every parent needs to know (2nd ed.). Elk Grove Village, IL: American Academy of Pediatrics, 219 pp.

Annotation: This book covers the importance of sleep to growth and development and addresses proper sleep and the challenges parents face in getting their children to sleep. Topics include ages, stages, and phases for all ages of children; bedtime routines and rituals; dealing with fears, nightmares, night terrors, sleep apnea; allergies and asthma; headaches, leg pains, seizures, abdominal or gastrointestinal issues, in addition to developmental disabilities or attention deficit/hyperactivity disorders. Sleep safety and risk factors for sudden infant death are also discussed.

Contact: American Academy of Pediatrics, 345 Park Boulevard, Itasca, IL 60143, Telephone: (630) 626-6000 Secondary Telephone: (847) 434-4000 Fax: (847) 434-8000 Web Site: https://www.aap.org $16.95, plus shipping and handling.

Keywords: Adolescents, Child development, Children, Children with special health care needs, Disabilities, Infants, SIDS, Sleep, Sleep apnea syndromes, Sleep disorders, Sleep position, Sleep stages

Nebraska Department of Health and Human Services, Maternal and Infant Health Program. 2012. Maternal and infant health priorities and opportunities in home visiting. [Lincoln, NE]: Nebraska Department of Health and Human Services, 12 pp.

Annotation: This resource is a printout of presentation slides that provide information about maternal and infant health priorities and opportunities in home visiting. The presentation discusses opportunities for preventing premature birth. obesity, and maternal depression in the context of home visiting, Best practices for safe sleep, infant illness care, and infant feeding problems are also discussed.

Contact: Nebraska Department of Health and Human Services, P.O. Box 95026, Lincoln, NE 68509-5026, Telephone: (402) 471-3121 E-mail: dhhs.helpline@nebraska.gov Web Site: http://www.hhs.state.ne.us Available from the website.

Keywords: Depression, Feeding disorders, Health care, Home visiting, Infant feeding, Infant health, Mental health, Obesity, Postpartum depression, Preterm birth, Prevention, SIDS, Safety, Sleep position, Women's health

Lorenzo SB. 2011–. Sleep in infants, children, adolescents, and pregnant women: Professional resource guide. Washington, DC: National Center for Education in Maternal and Child Health,

Annotation: This knowledge path is a guide to resources about sleep in infants, children, adolescents, and pregnant women. Topics include anxiety and depression, autism spectrum, physical causes of sleep disturbances such as bruxism, insomnia, pregnancy, safe sleep for infants, and others. The path is aimed at health professionals, researchers, educators, and community advocates. Separate briefs present resources for families and schools. The knowledge path is updated periodically. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Center for Education in Maternal and Child Health, Georgetown University, Telephone: (202) 784-9770 E-mail: mchgroup@georgetown.edu Web Site: https://www.ncemch.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescents, Bibliographies, Electronic publications, Infants, Knowledge paths, Pregnant women, Sleep, Sleep disorders, Sleep stages, Young children

Porges S. 1998. Regulatory Disorders and Developmental Outcomes: [Final report]. College Park, MD: University of Maryland at College Park, 53 pp.

Annotation: The overall goal of the project was to identify during infancy the measurable precursors of severe behavioral and emotional disorders. The study recruited 80 infants with regulatory disorders and 80 normal peers (matched for socioeconomic status, minority group status, presence or absence of father in home, number of children in family, and parenting stress). The regulatory disordered infants and control infants were assessed at 9 months and followed at 24 and 36 months. A comprehensive battery was administered at each assessment point. Mothers completed questionnaires on child temperament, child behavior problems, parenting stress, and demographic information. At 36 months, children received an evaluation to assess behavioral and emotional difficulties. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Technical Information Service, U.S. Department of Commerce, 5301 Shawnee Road, Alexandria, VA 22312, Telephone: (703) 605-6050 Secondary Telephone: (888) 584-8332 E-mail: customerservice@ntis.gov Web Site: http://www.ntis.gov Document Number: NTIS PB2000-106684.

Keywords: Affective Disorders, Behavior Disorders, Feeding Disorders, Infant Health Care, Infants, MCH Research, Preschool children, Regulatory Disorders, Research, Research, Sensory Impairments, Sleep Disorders, Toddlers

American Academy of Pediatrics, Committee on Psychosocial Aspects of Child and Family Health. 1988. Guidelines for health supervision II. Elk Grove Village, IL: American Academy of Pediatrics, 159 pp.

Annotation: This manual presents selected approaches for pediatricians and other child health professionals in caring for children and families whose health and adaptation are thought to be in the normal range. This notebook incorporates biomedical, developmental, and psychosocial information. For each checkup, it suggests questions to ask the parent, factors to look for in examining the child, immunizations, and anticipatory guidance to offer the parents. Supplementary information is given on common issues including self-comforting behaviors, feeding behavior in infancy and early childhood, toilet training, sleep problems, temper tantrums, management of the difficult infant and child, single parenting, and dysfunctional parenting. The manual emphasizes open communication and therapeutic alliance between the physician and the patient and his or her family.

Contact: American Academy of Pediatrics, 345 Park Boulevard, Itasca, IL 60143, Telephone: (630) 626-6000 Secondary Telephone: (847) 434-4000 Fax: (847) 434-8000 Web Site: https://www.aap.org $30.00 (includes 160-page spiral bound manual and 22 spiral-bound cue cards).

Keywords: Adolescent health, Behavior, Behavior problems, Child development, Child health, Children, Dysfunctional families, Feeding, Health services, Health supervision, Infant development, Infant health, Parents, Pediatrics, Physician patient relations, Preventive health services, Psychosocial development, Single parents, Sleep disorders, Stress, Tantrums, Toilet training

   

This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number U02MC31613, MCH Advanced Education Policy, $3.5 M. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.