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Strengthening the evidence for maternal and child health programs

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Items in this list may be obtained from the sources cited. Contact information reflects the most current data about the source that has been provided to the MCH Digital Library.


Displaying records 1 through 20 (56 total).

National Center on Family Homelessness. 2012. Developing a trauma-informed approach to serving young homeless families. Needham, MA: National Center on Family Homelessness, 11 pp.

Annotation: This brief outlines the core principles of trauma-informed care and outlines steps that organizations can take to adopt a trauma-informed approach to improve services to families that are experiencing homelessness. The brief discusses the core principles of trauma-informed care and provides five detailed steps to becoming trauma informed.

Contact: National Center on Family Homelessness, American Institutes for Research, 201 Jones Road, Suite 1, Waltham, MA 02451, Telephone: (781) 373-7073 E-mail: info@familyhomelessness.org Web Site: http://www.familyhomelessness.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent parents, Emotional trauma, Families, High risk groups, Homeless persons, Homelessness, Low income groups, Mothers, Parents, Programs, Single parents, Social services, Stress, Trauma, Young children, Young children

Scott ME, Steward-Streng NR, Manlove J, Moore KA. 2012. The characteristics and circumstances of teen fathers: At the birth of their first child and beyond. Child Trends, 6 pp. (Research brief)

Annotation: This research brief presents a statistical portrait of adolescent fathers' characteristics at the time of their first child's birth; their union status (i.e., married, cohabiting, or not in a relationship) at the birth; their subsequent experience fathering a child, if any; and their residential status at birth and in young adulthood (i.e., whether they were living with their children).

Contact: Child Trends, 7315 Wisconsin Avenue, Suite 1200 W, Bethesda, MD 20814, Telephone: (240) 223-9200 E-mail: Web Site: http://www.childtrends.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent attitudes, Adolescent behavior, Adolescent parents, Age factors, Economic factors, Ethnic factors, Fathers, Parent child relations, Public policy, Racial factors, Single parents, Statistical data, Young adults

Wood RG, Moore Q, Clarkwest A, Killewald A, Monahan S. 2012. The Building Strong Families Project: The long-term effects of Building Strong Families—A relationship skills education program for unmarried parents. Princeton, NJ: Mathematica Policy Research, 33 pp. (OPRE report 2012-28)

Annotation: This report presents findings from an evaluation of the long-term effectiveness of the Building Strong Families (BSF) project -- a relationship skill building education program for unmarried parents sponsored by the Administration for Children and Families (ACF), U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, The report presents an overview of the percentage of children born to unmarried parents; describes the BSF program designed to serve unmarried, romantically involved couples who were expecting or recently had a baby; and discusses the impact of the BSF program on participating couples (for example, its effects on parenting, father involvement, child well being, and the couple's relationship). The impact of BSF on key outcomes such as parenting, family stability, and economic stability are provided in the appendices.

Contact: Mathematica Policy Research, P.O. Box 2393, Princeton, NJ 08543-2393, Telephone: (609) 799-3535 Fax: (609) 799-0005 E-mail: info@mathematica-mpr.com Web Site: http://www.mathematica-mpr.com Available from the website.

Keywords: Families, Family relationships, Family support programs, Outcome evaluation, Parents, Relationships, Single parents

Wildsmith E, Steward-Streng NR, Manlove J. 2011. Childbearing outside of marriage: Estimates and trends in the United States. Washington, DC: Child Trends, 6 pp. (Research brief)

Annotation: This research brief examines trends in nonmarital childbearing in the United States between 1970 and 2009. Drawing on birth data from the National Vital Statistics Reports and Child Trends' analysis of data from the Early Childhood Longitudinal Study-Birth Cohort (ECLS-B), the brief describes the characteristics of women who have children outside of marriage and examines how patterns in nonmarital childbearing have changed over time. Statistics compare childbearing rates among unmarried women according to age, race, ethnicity, and other factors. The brief also examines trends in cohabitation patterns among unmarried parents. Details about the data sources used in the research include a description of the most common measures of nonmarital childbearing.

Contact: Child Trends, 7315 Wisconsin Avenue, Suite 1200 W, Bethesda, MD 20814, Telephone: (240) 223-9200 E-mail: Web Site: http://www.childtrends.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Birth rates, Families, Marriage, Single parents, Statistics, Trends

Pew Research Center. 2010. The new demography of American motherhood. Pew Research Center, 37 pp. (A social and demographic trends report)

Annotation: This report examines and explains trends in the demography of motherhood over the past two decades, explores the reasons people say they became parents, and examines public attitudes about key trends shaping today's birth patterns. Topics include age trends, race and ethnicity trends, marriage and motherhood, education and motherhood, family size, reasons for having children, fertility treatment, women without children, and older mothers, among others.

Contact: Pew Research Center, 1615 L Street, N.W., Suite 700, Washington, DC 20036, Telephone: (202) 419-4300 Fax: (202) 419-4349 Web Site: http://pewresearch.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Age factors, Age factors, Attitudes, Education, Ethnic factors, Families, Income factors, Mothers, Parenting attitudes, Parents, Racial factors, Single mothers, Trends

Craigie T, Brooks-Gunn J, Waldfogel J. 2010. Family structure, family stability and early child wellbeing. Princeton, NJ: Princeton University, Bendheim-Thoman Center for Research on Child Wellbeing, 30 pp.

Annotation: This study uses data from the Fragile Families and Child Wellbeing Study --a nationally representative cohort of children born in large U.S. cities between 1998 and 2000 -- to distinguish the effects of family structure at birth from family stability over time on child health, cognitive, and socio-emotional outcomes. The authors' findings indicate that family structure and stability are important to all child outcomes but that the health outcomes of children born to married or cohabiting parents are more adversely affected by changes in family structure over time. The study looks at two models: one that measures family structure at birth only and a second that measures possible changes in family structure since birth. Descriptive statistics for outcome measures and mediators are provided in tables, which include variables such as asthma, obesity, aggressive behavior, anxiety/depressive behavior, income, father involvement, and parental depression.

Contact: Princeton University, Bendheim-Thoman Center for Research on Child Wellbeing, Wallace Hall, Princeton, NJ 08544, Telephone: (609) 258-5894 Fax: (609) 258-5804 E-mail: crcw@opr.princeton.edu Web Site: http://crcw.princeton.edu Available from the website.

Keywords: Behavior development, Biological parents, Child health, Cognitive development, Comparison groups, Data, Families, Longitudinal studies, Measures, Models, Outcome evaluation, Single parents, Statistics, Young children

Carlson MJ, Berger LM. 2010. What kids get from parents: Packages of parental involvement across complex family forms. Princeton, NJ: Princeton University, Bendheim-Thoman Center for Research on Child Wellbeing, 42 pp.

Annotation: This paper compares parental involvement among young children living in different contemporary family structures, including those living with a single mother; those living with a resident social father, those living with two married biological parents; and those living in families where there are children from previous relationships. The paper then assesses the relative levels of parental investments (including parent-child engagement and economic resources) available to children at age 5, as well as changes in investments between children ages 1 through 5 by family structure categories. Included are measurements in the frequency of parent-child activity and access to income as reported by mothers. Tables and graphs compare findings according to specific family characteristics.

Contact: Princeton University, Bendheim-Thoman Center for Research on Child Wellbeing, Wallace Hall, Princeton, NJ 08544, Telephone: (609) 258-5894 Fax: (609) 258-5804 E-mail: crcw@opr.princeton.edu Web Site: http://crcw.princeton.edu Available from the website.

Keywords: Biological parents, Child health, Comparison groups, Economic factors, Families, Parent child relations, Parenting, Single parents, Social factors, Socioeconomic factors, Young children

National Campaign to Prevent Teen and Unplanned Pregnancy. 2009. Science says: Unplanned pregnancy as it relates to women, men, children and society. Washington, DC: National Campaign to Prevent Teen and Unplanned Pregnancy, 6 pp. (Putting what works to work; no. 40)

Annotation: This research brief provides a summary of unplanned pregnancy in the United States along with details about the consequences associated with unplanned pregnancy and what the American public thinks about the issue. The research brief discusses unplanned pregnancy overall, among unmarried women ages 20-29, and as reported by both mothers and fathers.

Contact: National Campaign to Prevent Teen and Unplanned Pregnancy = Power to Decide, 1776 Massachusetts Avenue, N.W., Suite 200, Washington, DC 20036, Telephone: (202) 478-8500 Fax: (202) 478-8588 E-mail: campaign@teenpregnancy.org Web Site: http://www.thenationalcampaign.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Children, Families, Fathers, Low income groups, Mother, Prenatal care, Prevention, Single parents, Unplanned pregnancy

O'Hare WP, Lamb VL. 2009. Ranking states on improvement in child well-being since 2000. Baltimore, MD: Annie E. Casey Foundation, 35 pp. (Kids Count working paper)

Annotation: This paper uses the 10 indicators established by the KIDS COUNT project of the Annie E. Casey Foundation to assess increases and decreases in child well-being for each state. (KIDS COUNT has been tracking the status of children and families in the United States since 1991 based on the performance of these 10 statistical indicators.) The paper updates a similar one using KIDS COUNT data from the 1990s. The paper first focuses on 5-year changes from 2000 to 2005, nationally and state by state. It then compares the changes from 2000 to 2005 with those from the previous two 5-year periods (1990 to 1995 and 1995 to 2000).

Contact: Annie E. Casey Foundation, 701 Saint Paul Street, Baltimore, MD 21202, Telephone: (410) 547-6600 Fax: (410) 547-6624 E-mail: webmail@aecf.org Web Site: http://www.aecf.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Trends, Adolescent mortality, Adolescent parents, Child mortality, Children, Employment, Families, Infant mortality, Low birthweight, Mortality rates, Parents, Poverty, Single parents

Romero M, Lee Y. 2008. The influence of maternal and family risk on chronic absenteeism in early schooling. New York, NY: National Center for Children in Poverty, 16 pp.

Annotation: This report explores how maternal and family risks impact early school absenteeism. The authors examine the prevalence of risk factors known to threaten young children's healthy development and early school success, including poverty, adolescent parenting, single parenting, low maternal education, receipt of welfare, poor maternal health, food insecurity, and large family size. The report also assesses the cumulative impact of early exposure to multiple risk factors, building on research showing that the more demographic and psycho-social risks children encounter, the more likely they are to experience poor developmental and school outcomes. Statistical information is presented in bar graphs throughout the report. Endnotes are included.

Contact: National Center for Children in Poverty, 215 West 125th Street, Third Floor, New York, NY 10027, Telephone: (646) 284-9600 Fax: (646) 284-9623 E-mail: info@nccp.org Web Site: http://www.nccp.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Academic achievement, Adolescent parents, Child development, Education, Families, Health, High risk children, Low income groups, Poverty, School age children, Single parents, Young children

National Campaign to Prevent Teen and Unplanned Pregnancy. 2008. Science says: Unplanned pregnancy and family turmoil. Washington, DC: National Campaign to Prevent Teen and Unplanned Pregnancy, 6 pp. (Putting what works to work; no. 34)

Annotation: This research brief explores the link between unplanned births and relationship turmoil and conflict within the family. The brief also provides background information about unplanned pregnancy in the United States.

Contact: National Campaign to Prevent Teen and Unplanned Pregnancy = Power to Decide, 1776 Massachusetts Avenue, N.W., Suite 200, Washington, DC 20036, Telephone: (202) 478-8500 Fax: (202) 478-8588 E-mail: campaign@teenpregnancy.org Web Site: http://www.thenationalcampaign.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Families, Parent child relations, Prenatal care, Relationships, Single parents, Stress, Unplanned pregnancy

McQueen C. 2008. For our children: Learning to work together—Co-parenting guide. (Rev. ed.). Austin, TX: Texas Office of the Attorney General, 23 pp., 1 video (DVD, VHS, or online streaming version, 22 min.)

Annotation: This booklet contains information to help parents who live apart work together to take care of their children. It includes a definition of the term co-parenting (sometimes called shared parenting) and explains how this arrangement can benefit the child. It offers guidance to help parents communicate with each other, talk to their children, provide consistency in their parenting, ease transitions between homes, and resolve conflict with the other parent. The booklet also discusses how children at different ages may be affected and provides the basic elements for an effective co-parenting plan. It is available in English and Spanish. The accompanying video can be watched online, downloaded, or ordered in DVD or VHS format; the DVD and VHS formats contain both English and Spanish versions.

Contact: Texas Office of the Attorney General, P.O. Box 12548, Austin, TX 78711-2548, Telephone: (512) 936-1737 Fax: (512) 469-3157 Web Site: http://www.oag.state.tx.us Available from the website.

Keywords: Audiovisual materials, Child custody, Child development, Communication, DVDs, Family relations, Parent child relations, Parenting, Parenting skills, Single parents, Spanish language materials, Videotapes

Elkind D. 2007. The hurried child: Growing up too fast too soon. (25 anv. ed.). Cambridge, MA: Perseus Publishing, 255 pp.

Annotation: This book examines the trend of rushing children along in their development, exposing them to influences not appropriate for their ages. In part one, the roles and behaviors of parents, schools, and the media are discussed, in addition to other influences such as the Internet and research findings on the brain. Part two explores the "hurrying" phenomenon and stress in children and includes topics such as growing up slowly, social development, how children react to stress, and how best to help the hurried child. A section of endnotes and an index conclude this book.

Contact: Perseus Publishing, 11 Cambridge Center, Cambridge, MA 02142, Telephone: (617) 252-5298 Secondary Telephone: (800) 255-1514 Fax: (800) 324-3791 Web Site: http://www.perseuspublishing.com Available in libraries. Document Number: ISBN 0-7382-0441-2.

Keywords: Child development, Child health, Child mental health, Parent child relations, Parenting attitudes, Psychosocial development, School age children, Single parents, Stress, Working parents

Mincieli L, Manlove J, McGarrett M, Moore,K, Ryan S. 2007. The relationship context of births outside of marriage: The rise of cohabitation. Washington, DC: Child Trends, 4 pp. (Research brief no. 2007-13)

Annotation: This research brief examines the rise in nonmarital childbearing and the number of births to cohabiting couples, as well as the characteristics of women who have births within cohabiting relationships, compared with women who have births within marriage or births outside of any union.The brief discusses trends in nonmarital childbearing, the cohabitation content, and demographic snapshots. A discussion and policy implications are included, as well as endnotes and references.

Contact: Child Trends, 7315 Wisconsin Avenue, Suite 1200 W, Bethesda, MD 20814, Telephone: (240) 223-9200 E-mail: Web Site: http://www.childtrends.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Age factors, Economic factors, Educational attainment, Educational factors, Families, Marriage, Single parents, Trends

Brookings Institution, Metropolitan Policy Program and Population Reference Bureau. 2006. Kids in the City: Indicators of child well-being in large cities from the 2004 American Community Survey. Washington, DC: Metropolitan Policy Program, Brookings Institution, 11 pp. (Survey series)

Annotation: This report provides information about levels of child poverty in the 50 largest cities in the United States, and the factors underlying those rates. The intent of the report is to document the variations in child poverty rates in different cities and the contextual factors associated with outcomes for children and families in different parts of the country. The report also seeks to demonstrate the usefulness of the Census Bureau's American Community Survey for monitoring child well-being in cities and elsewhere. The report, which begins with a summary of findings, discusses the methodology used, presents findings, and offers a conclusion. Statistical information is presented in figures and tables throughout the report. Endnotes are included.

Contact: Brookings Institution, Metropolitan Policy Program, 1775 Massachusetts Avenue, N.W., Washington, DC 20036, Telephone: (202) 797-6000 Web Site: http://www.brookings.edu/metro.aspx Available from the website.

Keywords: Children, Ethnic factors, Families, Poverty, Racial factors, Single parents, Surveys, Trends, Urban populations, Working parents

Moore KA. 2006. Cumulative risks among American children. Washington, DC: Child Trends, 3 pp. (Research-to-results brief)

Annotation: This brief identifies five widely and readily measured factors as indicators of risk for children's development: poverty, single-parent family, parents or parent with a low level of education, large family, and family not able to own or buy a home. The brief discusses distribution of levels of socioedemographic risk, the relationship between risk and child well-being, and implications for programs.

Contact: Child Trends, 7315 Wisconsin Avenue, Suite 1200 W, Bethesda, MD 20814, Telephone: (240) 223-9200 E-mail: Web Site: http://www.childtrends.org Available from the website. Document Number: ISBN 0-932359-38-8.

Keywords: Child development, Educational attainment, Families, High risk children, Poverty, Programs, Risk factors, Single parents

Duncan B. [2005]. Common/Unity: Creating optimistic futures for children and their homeless, single, young parents. Tucson, AZ: Arizona Health Sciences Center, University Medical Center, 155 pp., plus 1 DVD.

Annotation: This report describes a project funded in part by Healthy Tomorrows in the Tuscon, Arizona community from 2000-2005 to establish a residential-based services program for young single parents between the ages of 18 and 21. Topics include the use of the "Parents as Teachers" program in the project to improve the attachment process between the infants and young children and their parent by establishing good parenting techniques, correcting or preventing self-defeating social behaviors in the family units, and involving pediatric residents and nursing students. Report contents include the purpose, goals, and objectives of the project; a description of the methodology, evaluation, and results and outcomes; a list of publications and products; dissemination and utilization of results, future plans and follow-up; and type and amount of support and resources needed to replicate the project. References are provided along with appendices including reports, plans, and recommendations; a resource manual and life book, sample newsletters, pamphlets, and a presentation; materials from the Healthy Tomorrows conference; newspaper articles and information on the city-wide baby shower; and a DVD with a 12-minute promotional video about the program. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: Maternal and Child Health Library at Georgetown University, Telephone: (202) 784-9770 E-mail: mchgroup@georgetown.edu Web Site: https://www.mchlibrary.org

Keywords: Adolescent parents, Arizona, Audiovisual materials, Community based services, DVDs, Family support programs, Final reports, Homeless persons, MCH research, Parent child relations, Parent education, Parent support services, Single parents

Harknett K. 2005. Children's elevated risk of asthma in unmarried families: Underlying structural and behavioral mechanisms. Princeton, NJ: Princeton University, Center for Research on Child Wellbeing, 37 pp. (Working paper no. 2005-01-FF)

Annotation: This paper uses longitudinal data from the Fragile Families and Child Wellbeing study to provide evidence on the mechanisms underlying the relationship between family structure and children's asthma to shed light on the fact that among a recent birth cohort in U.S. cities, children were far more likely to be diagnosed with asthma and to experience an asthma-related emergency within 15 months of their birth if their parents were unmarried. The paper introduces the issues, describes the theory and prior research, describes the data and methods, and offers results. References are included. Statistical information is presented in tables grouped together at the end of the paper.

Contact: Princeton University, Bendheim-Thoman Center for Research on Child Wellbeing, Wallace Hall, Princeton, NJ 08544, Telephone: (609) 258-5894 Fax: (609) 258-5804 E-mail: crcw@opr.princeton.edu Web Site: http://crcw.princeton.edu Available from the website.

Keywords: Asthma, Child health, Families, Infant health, Marital status, Research, Single parents

Osborne C, McLanahan S, Brooks-Gunn J . 2005. Young children's behavioral problems in married and cohabitating families. Princeton, NJ: Princeton University, Bendheim-Thoman Center for Research on Child Wellbeing, 4 pp. (Fragile families research brief; no. 33)

Annotation: This research brief examines the behavior of children born to married and cohabiting parents in stable unions to determine whether marital status at birth is associated with behavior problems at age 3. If differences in child behavior exist between stably married and cohabiting families, the authors examine what proportion of problems is due to differences in parents' demographic characteristics, economic resources, relationship quality, health, and health behaviors. The authors also compare children born to cohabiting parents who marry after the child's birth with children born to cohabiting parents who remain in cohabiting relationships. The brief presents data and methods, results, and a conclusion and policy implications. Statistical information is presented in tables throughout the brief.

Contact: Princeton University, Bendheim-Thoman Center for Research on Child Wellbeing, Wallace Hall, Princeton, NJ 08544, Telephone: (609) 258-5894 Fax: (609) 258-5804 E-mail: crcw@opr.princeton.edu Web Site: http://crcw.princeton.edu Available from the website.

Keywords: Behavior problems, Demography, Economic factors, Families, Health, Health behavior, Marriage, Parents, Relationships, Single parents, Young children

Carlson M, McLanahan S, Brooks-Gunn J. 2005. Unmarried but not absent: Fathers' involvement with children after a nonmarital birth. Princeton, NJ: Princeton University, Bendheim-Thoman Center for Research on Child Wellbeing, 29 pp. (Working paper no. 05-07-FF)

Annotation: This paper investigates the level and predictors of fathers' involvement with children approximately 3 years after a nonmarital birth. The authors examine the frequency of fathers' spending time with their child, their engagement in various father-child activities, and their help with household tasks. The authors also examine differences in fathers' involvement by parents' relationship status at the child's birth. The paper, which includes an abstract, discusses previous research, data and methods, bivariate results, and regression results. A discussion is included. Statistical information is presented in tables grouped together at the end of the paper. References are included.

Contact: Maternal and Child Health Library at Georgetown University, Telephone: (202) 784-9770 E-mail: mchgroup@georgetown.edu Web Site: https://www.mchlibrary.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Families, Father child relations, Fathers, Parents, Relationships, Single fathers, Single mothers, Single parents

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This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number U02MC31613, MCH Advanced Education Policy, $3.5 M. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.