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Strengthening the evidence for maternal and child health programs

Search Results: MCHLine

Items in this list may be obtained from the sources cited. Contact information reflects the most current data about the source that has been provided to the MCH Digital Library.


Displaying records 1 through 20 (43 total).

Golden O, McDaniel M, Loprest P, Stanczyk A. 2013. Disconnected mothers and the well-being of children: A research report. Washington, DC: Urban Institute, 48 pp.

Annotation: This paper presents research findings on the major risks to children’s development, the prevalence of those risks among disconnected families, and the potential consequences for children. It also describes potential interventions to help disconnected families by increasing and stabilizing family income, enhancing parenting skills, supporting children directly, and reaching out to disconnected mothers who are not citizens. Finally, directions for future research are provided.

Contact: Urban Institute, 2100 M Street, N.W., Washington, DC 20037, Telephone: (202) 833-7200 Fax: (202) 467-5775 E-mail: http://www.urban.org/about/contact.cfm Web Site: http://www.urban.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Child development, Families, Life course, Low income groups, Mother child relations, Poverty, Risk factors, Single mothers, Socioeconomic status, Unemployment

National Center on Family Homelessness. 2012. Developing a trauma-informed approach to serving young homeless families. Needham, MA: National Center on Family Homelessness, 11 pp.

Annotation: This brief outlines the core principles of trauma-informed care and outlines steps that organizations can take to adopt a trauma-informed approach to improve services to families that are experiencing homelessness. The brief discusses the core principles of trauma-informed care and provides five detailed steps to becoming trauma informed.

Contact: National Center on Family Homelessness, American Institutes for Research, 201 Jones Road, Suite 1, Waltham, MA 02451, Telephone: (781) 373-7073 E-mail: info@familyhomelessness.org Web Site: http://www.familyhomelessness.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent parents, Emotional trauma, Families, High risk groups, Homeless persons, Homelessness, Low income groups, Mothers, Parents, Programs, Single parents, Social services, Stress, Trauma, Young children, Young children

Bertrand M, Pan J. 2011. The trouble with boys: Social influences and the gender gap in disruptive behavior. Cambridge, MA: National Bureau of Economic Research, 62 pp. (NBER working paper series no. 17541)

Annotation: This paper explores the importance of the home and school environments in explaining the gender gap in disruptive behavior. The authors discuss data used, what drives the gender gap in non-cognitive skills, and why boys raised by single mothers are particularly at risk.

Contact: National Bureau of Economic Research, 1050 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, MA 02138-5398, Telephone: (617) 868-3900 Fax: (617) 868-2742 E-mail: info@nber.org Web Site: http://www.nber.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Behavior problems, Child behavior, Child development, Children, Families, Female children, Income factors, Low income groups, Male children, Mental health, Parent child relations, Research, School role, Single mothers

Pew Research Center. 2010. The new demography of American motherhood. Pew Research Center, 37 pp. (A social and demographic trends report)

Annotation: This report examines and explains trends in the demography of motherhood over the past two decades, explores the reasons people say they became parents, and examines public attitudes about key trends shaping today's birth patterns. Topics include age trends, race and ethnicity trends, marriage and motherhood, education and motherhood, family size, reasons for having children, fertility treatment, women without children, and older mothers, among others.

Contact: Pew Research Center, 1615 L Street, N.W., Suite 700, Washington, DC 20036, Telephone: (202) 419-4300 Fax: (202) 419-4349 Web Site: http://pewresearch.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Age factors, Age factors, Attitudes, Education, Ethnic factors, Families, Income factors, Mothers, Parenting attitudes, Parents, Racial factors, Single mothers, Trends

Mather M. 2010. U.S. children in single-mother families. Washington, DC: Population Reference Bureau, 4 pp. (Data brief)

Annotation: This data brief summarizes the social and economic situation of children in single-mother families in the United States and compares the characteristics of single-mother families across different racial and ethnic groups. It discusses changes in the number of families headed by single mothers during the past 30 years, as well as the rate of poverty, low income, and adequate employer benefits among single mothers. The brief also suggests how single-mother families might be redefined, based on the most recent data available, to better meet the needs of the children living in these families.

Contact: Population Reference Bureau, 1875 Connecticut Avenue, N.W., Suite 520, Washington, DC 20009, Telephone: (800) 877-9881 Fax: (202) 328-3937 E-mail: popref@prb.org Web Site: http://www.prb.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Child health, Data, Single mothers, Socioeconomic factors, Statistics

Ventura SJ. 2009. Changing patterns of nonmarital childbearing in the United States. Hyattsville, MD: National Center for Health Statistics, 7 pp. (NCHS data brief, no. 18)

Annotation: This report presents data describing trends in U.S. nonmarital births by age and ethnicity and compares these findings to nonmarital childbearing in other countries.

Contact: National Center for Health Statistics, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 3311 Toledo Road, Room 5419, Hyattsville, MD 20782, Telephone: (800) 232-4636 Secondary Telephone: (888) 232-6348 Fax: (301) 458-4020 E-mail: nchsquery@cdc.gov Web Site: http://www.cdc.gov/nchs Available from the website.

Keywords: Birth rates, Childbirth, Single mothers, Statistics

Liu SH, Heiland F. 2007. New estimates on the effect of parental separation on child health. Princeton, NJ: Bendheim-Thoman Center for Research on Child Wellbeing, Princeton University, 32 pp. ([Working paper no. 2007-14-FF])

Annotation: The study described in this paper examined the causal link between parental separation and the health of young children. Using a representative sample of children born to unwed parents drawn from the Fragile Families and Child Wellbeing Study, the authors investigated whether separation between unmarried biological parents has a causal effect on a child's likelihood of developing asthma by age 3. The paper provides background and discusses the statistical model and estimation strategy; the data, sample, and evidence; estimation results; and conclusions. Statistical information is presented in tables and figures at the end of the paper. References are included. The paper includes a technical appendix that provides additional tables and figures.

Contact: Princeton University, Bendheim-Thoman Center for Research on Child Wellbeing, Wallace Hall, Princeton, NJ 08544, Telephone: (609) 258-5894 Fax: (609) 258-5804 E-mail: crcw@opr.princeton.edu Web Site: http://crcw.princeton.edu Available from the website.

Keywords: Child health, Asthma, Research, Single fathers, Single mothers, Statistical data, Young children

Ananat EO, Hungerman DM. 2007. The power of the pill for the next generation. Cambridge, MA: National Bureau of Economic Research, 36 pp. (NBER working paper series no. 13402)

Annotation: This paper assesses how access to oral contraception among young unmarried women affected the number of children born to these women as well as the women's maternal characteristics (educational attainment, marital status, and type of career). The authors then examine how children's differing circumstances that result from women's access to oral contraception relate to changes in the women's short- and long-term fertility behavior. Finally, the authors consider whether increased availablity of oral contraception led to fewer abortions among young women. The paper, which includes an abstract, introduces the issue, provides a brief history of oral contraceptives; discusses oral contraception and maternal characteristics, the effects of oral contraception on fertility and abortion; and offers conclusions. Endnotes and references are included. Statistical data are presented in tables and figures grouped together at the end of the report.

Contact: National Bureau of Economic Research, 1050 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, MA 02138-5398, Telephone: (617) 868-3900 Fax: (617) 868-2742 E-mail: info@nber.org Web Site: http://www.nber.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Abortion, Access to care, Careers, Contraception, Educational attainment, Marital status, Research, Single mothers, Statistical data, Women's health, Young adults

Osborne C, Knab J. 2006. The effects of health on health insurance status in fragile families. Princeton, NJ: Bendheim-Thoman Center for Research on Child Wellbeing, Princeton University, 43 pp. (Working paper no. 06-10-FF)

Annotation: This paper uses data from the Fragile Families and Child Wellbeing Study to estimate the effects of poor infant health, pre-pregnancy health conditions of the mother, and the father's health status on health insurance status of urban, mostly unmarried mothers and their 1-year-old children.The paper, which includes an abstract, introduces the issue; provides background; discusses the data, the descriptive analysis, and the modeling strategy; presents multivariate results; and offers a conclusion. References are included. Statistical information is presented in tables at the end of the paper.

Contact: Princeton University, Bendheim-Thoman Center for Research on Child Wellbeing, Wallace Hall, Princeton, NJ 08544, Telephone: (609) 258-5894 Fax: (609) 258-5804 E-mail: crcw@opr.princeton.edu Web Site: http://crcw.princeton.edu Available from the website.

Keywords: Families, Fathers, Health insurance, Single mothers, Uninsured persons, Urban populations, Women's health

Hummer RA, Hamilton ER, You XH, Padilla YC. 2005. Health status and health care among Mexican American children born to unmarried women. Princeton, NJ: Princeton University, Bendheim-Thoman Center for Research on Child Wellbeing, 28 pp. (Working paper no. 05-14-FF)

Annotation: This paper describes a comparative analysis of Mexican-American children and children in other major race and ethnic groups at age 3, drawn from a national sample of births to unmarried women. The paper's main objective is to document Mexican-American health and health care outcomes in early childhood. The paper, which includes an abstract, presents a review of recent literature, data and methods, results, and a conclusion. Statistical information is presented in tables grouped together at the end of the report. References and endnotes are included.

Contact: Princeton University, Bendheim-Thoman Center for Research on Child Wellbeing, Wallace Hall, Princeton, NJ 08544, Telephone: (609) 258-5894 Fax: (609) 258-5804 E-mail: crcw@opr.princeton.edu Web Site: http://crcw.princeton.edu Available from the website.

Keywords: Child health, Ethnic factors, MCH research, Mexican Americans, Racial factors, Single mothers, Young children

Carlson M, McLanahan S, Brooks-Gunn J. 2005. Unmarried but not absent: Fathers' involvement with children after a nonmarital birth. Princeton, NJ: Princeton University, Bendheim-Thoman Center for Research on Child Wellbeing, 29 pp. (Working paper no. 05-07-FF)

Annotation: This paper investigates the level and predictors of fathers' involvement with children approximately 3 years after a nonmarital birth. The authors examine the frequency of fathers' spending time with their child, their engagement in various father-child activities, and their help with household tasks. The authors also examine differences in fathers' involvement by parents' relationship status at the child's birth. The paper, which includes an abstract, discusses previous research, data and methods, bivariate results, and regression results. A discussion is included. Statistical information is presented in tables grouped together at the end of the paper. References are included.

Contact: Maternal and Child Health Library at Georgetown University, Telephone: (202) 784-9770 E-mail: mchgroup@georgetown.edu Web Site: https://www.mchlibrary.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Families, Father child relations, Fathers, Parents, Relationships, Single fathers, Single mothers, Single parents

Meyer BD, Sullivan JX. 2005. The well-being of single-mother families after welfare reform. Washington, DC: Brookings Institution, 8 pp. (Welfare reform and beyond; no. 33)

Annotation: This policy brief discusses the well-being of single-mother families after welfare reform as reflected by two different indicators: income and consumption. The authors discuss the differences in trends evidenced by income vs. consumption data, explain the differences, discuss the effects of recent policy changes on well-being, and present policy implications. Statistical information is presented in figures throughout the brief. A list of related Brookings Institution resources and a list of related readings are provided.

Contact: Brookings Institution, 1775 Massachusetts Avenue, N.W., Washington, DC 20036, Telephone: (202) 797-6000 Fax: (202) 797-6004 E-mail: communications@brookings.edu Web Site: http://www.brookings.edu Available from the website.

Keywords: Evaluation, Families, Family income, Public policy, Single mothers, Trends, Welfare reform

Flanigan C, Huffman R, Smith J. 2005. Science says: Teens' attitudes toward nonmarital childbearing, 2002. Washington, DC: National Campaign to Prevent Teen Pregnancy, 3 pp. (Putting what works to work; no. 15)

Annotation: This issue brief uses the most recent round of National Survey of Family Growth data, collected in 2002, to examine adolescents' attitudes toward childbearing outside marriage. In particular, the brief discusses the attitudes of older adolescents, sexually experienced adolescents, and adolescent mothers. Endnotes are included. Statistical information is presented in figures and tables throughout the brief.

Contact: National Campaign to Prevent Teen and Unplanned Pregnancy = Power to Decide, 1776 Massachusetts Avenue, N.W., Suite 200, Washington, DC 20036, Telephone: (202) 478-8500 Fax: (202) 478-8588 E-mail: campaign@teenpregnancy.org Web Site: http://www.thenationalcampaign.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent attitudes, Adolescent mothers, Adolescent pregnancy, Research, Single parents

Osborne C. 2004. Maternal stress and mothering behaviors in stable and unstable families. [Rev. ed.]. Princeton, NJ: Princeton University, Center for Research on Child Wellbeing, 37 pp. (Working paper no. 03-08-FF)

Annotation: This paper uses data from the Fragile Families Study to answer two main questions: (1) Are there differences in maternal stress and mothering behaviors across stably married, cohabiting, visiting, and single-mother families? And (2) Does family instability have a negative impact on mothering behaviors? The paper focuses specifically on the relationship between the biological parents of a 1-year-old focal child. The paper provides background, describes the data and methodology, and offers results and a conclusion. Statistical information is presented in tables throughout the paper. The paper includes references.

Contact: Princeton University, Bendheim-Thoman Center for Research on Child Wellbeing, Wallace Hall, Princeton, NJ 08544, Telephone: (609) 258-5894 Fax: (609) 258-5804 E-mail: crcw@opr.princeton.edu Web Site: http://crcw.princeton.edu Available from the website.

Keywords: Children, Families, Infants, Marital status, Mothers, Parent child relations, Parents, Research, Single mothers, Stress

Child Trends and National Campaign to Prevent Teen Pregnancy. 2004. Science says: The relationship between teenage motherhood and marriage. Washington, DC: National Campaign to Prevent Teen Pregnancy, 9 pp. (Putting what works to work; no. 11)

Annotation: This report explores the relationship between adolescent motherhood and marriage and how being born to an adolescent mother affects a child's life. Issues discussed in the report include overall trends in adolescent births and marriage, the marital status of adolescent mothers, adolescent mothers' marital hopes and realities, and the consequences of remaining an unmarried mother. Statistical information is presented in figures throughout the report. The report concludes with endnotes.

Contact: National Campaign to Prevent Teen and Unplanned Pregnancy = Power to Decide, 1776 Massachusetts Avenue, N.W., Suite 200, Washington, DC 20036, Telephone: (202) 478-8500 Fax: (202) 478-8588 E-mail: campaign@teenpregnancy.org Web Site: http://www.thenationalcampaign.org Available at no charge; also available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent mothers, Adolescent pregnancy, Children, Marriage, Poverty, Single mothers, Trends

O'Hare WP. 2003. Perceptions and misperceptions of America's children: The role of the print media. Baltimore, MD: Annie E. Casey Foundation, 18 pp. (KIDS COUNT working paper)

Annotation: This paper, which is linked to a recent report that identified several misconceptions that Americans have about children, examines one possible source of those misconceptions: print media. The study reported in the paper analyzed a set of articles that appeared in five major newspapers from September 2002 to September 2003. The author analyzed articles on the following topics: immigration, welfare, single parent families, adolescent birth rates, and out-of-wedlock births. Data are presented in a table at the end of the paper. The paper concludes with a reference list.

Contact: Annie E. Casey Foundation, Kids Count, 701 Saint Paul Street, Baltimore, MD 21202, Telephone: (410) 547-6600 Fax: (410) 547-6624 Web Site: http://www.aecf.org/MajorInitiatives/KIDSCOUNT.aspx Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent parents, Children, Immigration, Mass media, Misinformation, Single mothers, Single parents, Welfare

Kaestner R, Kaushal N. 2003. Welfare reform and health insurance coverage of low-income families. Cambridge, MA: National Bureau of Economic Research, 30 pp. (NBER working paper series no. W10033)

Annotation: This paper addresses the question of whether welfare reform adversely affected the health insurance coverage of low-educated single mothers and their children. Specifically, the authors investigated whether changes in the welfare caseload during the 1990s were associated with changes in Medicaid participation, private insurance coverage, and the number of uninsured among single mothers and their children The paper includes an abstract, an introduction, a background and literature review section, a discussion of the research design and statistical methods, a description of the data, a results section, and conclusions. The paper also includes a references list. Statistical information is presented in tables grouped together at the end of the paper.

Contact: National Bureau of Economic Research, 1050 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, MA 02138-5398, Telephone: (617) 868-3900 Fax: (617) 868-2742 E-mail: info@nber.org Web Site: http://www.nber.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Children, Health insurance, Low income groups, Medicaid, Research, Single mothers, Welfare reform

Croan T, Hatcher J, Jager J, Long M, O'Hare W, Wertheimer R. [2001]. The Right Start state trends: Conditions of babies and their families in America's largest cities (1990-1998). Baltimore, MD: Annie E. Casey Foundation, 136 pp.

Annotation: This report constitutes an expansion on The Right Start: Conditions of Babies and Their Families in America's Largest Cities, last published in 1999. This report includes updated data, annual data for each year back to 1990, and a one-page narrative description of how each state fared during the 1990-1998 period, and how it compared with national averages. Each state profile contains information on the following items: (1) adolescent births; (2) repeat adolescent births; (3) births to unmarried women; (4) low maternal education; (5) late or no prenatal care; (6) smoking during pregnancy; (7) low-birthweight births; and (8) preterm births. Numerous charts and tables present statistical information. References are provided. The appendices include state rankings on the narrative items; definitions, data sources, and reporting issues; and primary contacts for state Kids Count projects.

Contact: Annie E. Casey Foundation, Kids Count, 701 Saint Paul Street, Baltimore, MD 21202, Telephone: (410) 547-6600 Fax: (410) 547-6624 Web Site: http://www.aecf.org/MajorInitiatives/KIDSCOUNT.aspx Available at no charge; also available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent pregnancy, Child advocacy, Low birthweight, Prenatal care, Preterm birth, Single mothers, Smoking during pregnancy, State surveys, Statistical data

Nord CW, Brimhall D, West J. 1997. Fathers' involvement in their children's schools. Washington, DC: U.S. Department of Education, National Center for Education Statistics, 160 pp. (Statistical analysis report)

Annotation: This report provides an overview of the extent to which resident (excluding foster) and nonresident fathers are involved in their children's schools and examines the influence their involvement has on how children are doing in school. Information on mothers' involvement is also provided. A distinction is made between fathers in two-parent families and fathers who are heads of single-parent families.

Contact: National Center for Education Statistics, 1990 K Street, N. W., Washington, DC 20006, Telephone: (202) 502-7300 Secondary Telephone: (202) 502-7442 Fax: (202) 219-1736 Web Site: http://www.nces.ed.gov Available in libraries. Document Number: NCES 98-091.

Keywords: Children, Families, Fathers, Mothers, Schools, Single fathers

Pollock S. 1996. Will the dollars stretch?: Teen parents living on their own—Virtual reality through stories and check-writing practice. Buena Park, CA: Morning Glory Press, 94 pp.

Annotation: This book uses four fictional scenarios to demonstrate some of the difficulties adolescent parents may encounter managing their family finances. Each scenario assumes the characters have limited incomes, and the book makes its points by having the reader maintain the character's checkbook in each scenario. The book explores the costs associated with caring for children when family finances are limited; it emphasizes the need for adolescents to make realistic life choices including delaying parenthood until they are financially prepared.

Contact: Morning Glory Press, 6595 San Haroldo Way, Buena Park, CA 90620-3748, Telephone: (888) 612-8254 Fax: (888) 327-4362 E-mail: info@morningglorypress.com Web Site: http://www.morningglorypress.com Available in libraries. Document Number: ISBN 1-885356-12-9.

Keywords: Adolescent parents, Educational materials, Family economics, Fiction, Low income groups, Single mothers

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This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number U02MC31613, MCH Advanced Education Policy, $3.5 M. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.