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Strengthening the evidence for maternal and child health programs

Search Results: MCHLine

Items in this list may be obtained from the sources cited. Contact information reflects the most current data about the source that has been provided to the MCH Digital Library.


Displaying records 1 through 9 (9 total).

Stuemky J. n.d.. Developing and Improving the Capacity of Existing Pediatric Emergency Medical Services in Oklahoma [Final report]. Oklahoma City, OK: University of Oklahoma,

Annotation: The State of Oklahoma has a limited and fragmented EMS system that has not adequately addressed the needs of its pediatric population. To decrease the negative outcomes of pediatric emergency care, this project: (1) Established a prehospital- and hospital-based data collection system to provide definition of emergency medical services for children (EMSC) and identify negative outcome factors; (2) developed and assisted a statewide consortium in support of EMSC issues; (3) provided pediatric prehospital and hospital care training to emergency medical technicians, nurses, and physicians; and (4) worked with Native Americas and Hispanic populations to prevent child abuse and related injuries. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Keywords: Child Abuse, Data Collection, Emergency Medical Services for Children, Emergency Medical Technicians, Pediatric Advanced Life Support Programs, Professional Education in EMSC, Shaken Infant Syndrome

Nebraska Department of Health and Human Services. 2012. Never shake a baby (rev. ed.). [Lincoln, NE]: Nebraska Department of Health and Human Services, 2 pp.

Annotation: This brochure for parents provides information about why it is important to never shake a baby. The brochure explains what shaken baby syndrome is and its consequences and provides tips on what to do if an infant's crying is upsetting, how to try to stop an infant's crying, and what to do if someone suspects an infant has been shaken. The brochure is written in simple language and is available in both English and Spanish.

Contact: Nebraska Department of Health and Human Services, P.O. Box 95026, Lincoln, NE 68509-5026, Telephone: (402) 471-3121 E-mail: dhhs.helpline@nebraska.gov Web Site: http://www.hhs.state.ne.us Available from the website.

Keywords: Child abuse, Consumer education materials, Crying, Infant development, Infant health, Mental health, Parent child relations, Parenting skills, Shaken baby syndrome, Spanish language materials

KidsHealth. 2011. Abusive head trauma (shaken baby syndrome). [Jacksonville, FL]: Nemours Foundation,

Annotation: This resource presents information for parents about abusive head trauma (AHT)/inflicted traumatic brain injury -- also called shaken baby/shaken impact syndrome -- a form of inflicted head trauma. Topics include how these injuries happen, what are the effects, signs and symptoms, diagnosis, the child's development and education, and preventing AHT.

Contact: KidsHealth, Nemours, 10140 Centurion Parkway, Jacksonville, FL 32256, Telephone: (904) 697-4100 Fax: (904) 697-4220 E-mail: comments@KidsHealth.org Web Site: http://kidshealth.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Brain damage, Brain injuries, Child abuse, Head injuries, Infant care, Infant health, Injury prevention, Newborn infants, Physical abuse, Shaken baby syndrome

National Center for Injury Prevention and Control. [2010]. Preventing shaken baby syndrome: A guide for health departments and community-based organizations. Atlanta, GA: National Center for Injury Prevention and Control, 57 pp. (Heads Up series)

Annotation: This guide is designed to help organizations identify their role and to take action to protect infants from shaken baby syndrome (SBS). It outlines steps to implement evidence-based intervention strategies, to integrate specific education messages into existing programs for new parents, caregivers, professionals, and the general public, and to engage in activities that impact policy development that are effective in preventing shaken baby syndrome. The guide provides an overview of SBS; offers guidance on building a framework for prevention; provides strategies for creating and disseminating effective messages; describes ways to collaborate with other organizations; and suggests methods for impacting public health policy. Appendices include state SBS initiatives, a partnership planning tool, educational resources, and prevention tips for parents and caregivers.

Contact: National Center for Injury Prevention and Control, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 4770 Buford Highway, N.E., Mailstop F-63, Atlanta, GA 30341-3717, Telephone: (800) CDC-INFO Secondary Telephone: (888) 232-6348 Fax: (770) 488-4760 E-mail: cdcinfo@cdc.gov Web Site: http://www.cdc.gov/injury/index.html Available from the website.

Keywords: Child safety, Community programs, Infant care, Infant health, Injury prevention, Model programs, Prevention programs, Program development, Shaken baby syndrome, State initiatives

New York State Office of Children and Family Services. 2008. Helpful tips to keep your baby safe: Shaken baby syndrome (SBS). [Rensselaer, NY]: New York State Office of Children and Family Services, 1 p.

Annotation: This tip sheet defines shaken baby syndrome (SBS) and provides guidelines to help prevent its occurrence. It offers tips to help parents and other caregivers cope with the stress of a baby's crying, support baby's head adequately at all times, and discuss the dangers of shaking infants with friends, family members, and caregivers. One side of the tip sheet is in English and the other is in Spanish. It is also available in Arabic, Chinese, and Russian (1 p. each).

Contact: New York State Office of Children and Family Servcies, 52 Wasington Street, Rensselaer, NY 12144-2796, Telephone: (518) 473-7793 Fax: (518) 486-7550 Web Site: http://www.ocfs.state.ny.us/main/ Available from the website.

Keywords: Asian language materials, Child abuse, Child safety, Infant care, Infant health, Injury prevention, Newborn infants, Non English language materials, Physical abuse, Shaken baby syndrome, Spanish language materials

Kronkosky Charitable Foundation. 2007. Shaken baby syndrome and sudden infant death syndrome. San Antonio, TX: Kronkosky Charitable Foundation, 4 pp. (Research brief)

New York State Office of Children and Family Services. 2006. Helpful tips to keep your baby safe: Traumatic brain injury (TBI) (rev. ed.). [Rensselaer, NY]: New York State Office of Children and Family Services, 1 p.

Annotation: This fact sheet for parents provides tips to help prevent traumatic brain injury in infants. Tips are provided relating to car seats, changing tables and high chairs, safety gates, walkers, window locks and guards, and shaking infants. The fact sheet is written in English on one side and in Spanish on the other (print version). The electronic versions have English and Spanish in separate documents. It is also available in Chinese, Russian, and Arabic (these were published in 2003).

Contact: New York State Office of Children and Family Servcies, 52 Wasington Street, Rensselaer, NY 12144-2796, Telephone: (518) 473-7793 Fax: (518) 486-7550 Web Site: http://www.ocfs.state.ny.us/main/ Available from the website.

Keywords: Asian language materials, Brain injuries, Consumer education materials, Infant health, Non English language materials, Parenting skills, Prevention, Safety, Shaken baby syndrome, Spanish language materials

University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, College of Medicine, Department of Pediatrics, Section of General Pediatrics, Children's Hospital of Oklahoma, Oklahoma Emergency Medical Services for Children Project. [1994]. When your baby cries: Shaken baby syndrome—A universal problem from a Native American perspective. Oklahoma City, OK: Oklahoma Emergency Medical Services for Children Resource Center, 1 brochure (2 pp.).; 1 videotape (10 minutes, VHS 1/2 inch).

Annotation: This videotape presents information on why babies cry, the importance of determining why a baby is crying, and ways to alleviate the crying without shaking the baby. It uses animation to dramatize traditional matriarchal influences within Native American families that affect an infant's health. The brochure describes the videotape, includes information on the producers, and data on shaken baby syndrome. Both are available in English and Spanish. [Funded in part by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: Oklahoma Emergency Medical Services for Children Resource Center, ESMC Resource Center, Children's Hospital Oklahoma, 940 NE 13th St., CHO 1B1303, Oklahoma City, OK 73104-3307, Telephone: (405) 271-3307 E-mail: emsc@ouhsc.edu Web Site: http://www.oumedicine.com/body.cfm?id=1425 $15.00 plus $3.00 shipping and handling; discounts available for bulk orders.

Keywords: American Indians, Audiovisual materials, Child safety, Data, Health promotion, Infant health, Parent education, Prevention, Shaken baby syndrome, Spanish language materials, Videotapes

Seattle Children's Protection Plan. Have a plan. Seattle, WA: Seattle Children's Protection Program, 3 videos, 2 brochures (2 pp.).

Annotation: These videos give tips and insights from parents of newborn babies on how to handle the stress and emotions of being a parent, including coping with the frustration of crying, in order to keep the baby safe. The video is available in English and Spanish in VHS and DVD formats, and there is an English version for adolescent parents. Consumer brochures in English and Spanish are also available.

Contact: Seattle Children's Hospital, 4800 Sand Point Way NE, Seattle, WA 98105, Web Site: http://www.seattlechildrens.org Videos $18 each; also available from the website.

Keywords: Audiovisual materials, Consumer education materials, Infants, Injury prevention, Prevention, Shaken baby syndrome, Spanish language materials, Videos

   

This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number U02MC31613, MCH Advanced Education Policy, $3.5 M. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.