Skip Navigation

Strengthening the evidence for maternal and child health programs

Search Results: MCHLine

Items in this list may be obtained from the sources cited. Contact information reflects the most current data about the source that has been provided to the MCH Digital Library.


Displaying records 1 through 20 (137 total).

Milner-Fenwick. n.d.. Teen contraception. Timonium, MD: Milner-Fenwick, 1 videotape (13:30 minutes, VHS 1/2 inch). (Video counseling library)

Annotation: This videotape dispels common myths about contraception and describes a range of contraceptive options available today, including Norplant, Depro-Provera, and abstinence. It discusses the importance of using condoms in conjunction with other contraceptives to prevent sexually transmitted diseases. The information is presented by adolescents in a non-judgmental fashion; it does contain some explicit scenes. The videotape is available in English and Spanish.

Contact: Milner-Fenwick, 2125 Greenspring Drive, Timonium, MD 21093-3113, Telephone: (800) 432-8433 Secondary Telephone: (410) 252-1700 Fax: (410) 252-6316 E-mail: patiented@milner-fenwick.com Web Site: http://www.milner-fenwick.com/index.asp $250.00. Document Number: OB-130.

Keywords: Abstinence, Adolescent health, Adolescents, Audiovisual materials, Condoms, Contraception, Educational materials, Sexually transmitted diseases, Spanish language materials, Videotapes

Great Expectations/Healthy Start. n.d.. Prenatal education curriculum. New Orleans, LA: Great Expectations/Healthy Start, ca. 150 pp.

Annotation: This study guide consists of a series of brief training sessions on various aspects of prenatal and infant care. Curricula topics include the following: 1) anatomy and physiology of pregnancy; 2) breastfeeding; 3) alcohol, smoking, and drug abuse; 4) personal hygiene; 5) sexually transmitted diseases; 6) contraception/family planning; and 7) domestic violence. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: Great Expectations Foundation, Inc., 4298 Elysian Fields Avenue, Suite B, New Orleans, LA 70122, Telephone: (504) 288-7818 Fax: (504) 288-7328 E-mail: arichard@greatexp.org Web Site: Available at no charge.

Keywords: Adolescent pregnancy, Alcohol use during pregnancy, Breastfeeding, Contraception, Curricula, Domestic violence, Educational materials, Great Expectations/New Orleans Healthy Start, Infant care, Infant health, Nutrition, Pregnancy, Prenatal care, Prenatal education, Prenatal nutrition, Sexually transmitted diseases, Smoking, Substance dependence, Training materials

Keith J. n.d.. Family-Focused Strategy for Reducing Premature and Unprotected Sexual Activity Among Minority Youth in School-Based Health Clinics [Final report]. Dallas, TX: Dallas County Hospital District, 26 pp.

Annotation: The purpose of this project was to develop and demonstrate effective intervention strategies for the 10–15 year age group that can be carried out within a school-based comprehensive health care system to reduce the occurrence of premature and unprotected sexual intercourse in adolescents. More than 300 10-year-old children and their parents enrolled to receive annual health maintenance evaluations and a series of activities to enhance parent-child communication, parental knowledge of adolescent social and sexual development, and problem-solving and decision-making skills. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Technical Information Service, U.S. Department of Commerce, 5301 Shawnee Road, Alexandria, VA 22312, Telephone: (703) 605-6050 Secondary Telephone: (888) 584-8332 E-mail: customerservice@ntis.gov Web Site: http://www.ntis.gov Document Number: NTIS PB99-133977.

Keywords: Adolescents, Blacks, Decision Making Skills, Healthy Tomorrows Partnership for Children, Hispanics, Minority Groups, Parent Child Interaction, Parent Child Relationship, Preventive Health Care Education, School Dropouts, School Health Programs, School Health Services, Sexual Activity, Sexually Transmitted Diseases

Healthy Teen Network and ETR Associates. n.d.. Weaving science & practice: Frequently asked questions about science-based approaches. Baltimore, MD: Healthy Teen Network, 20 pp.

Annotation: This document describes seven science-based approaches in adolescent pregnancy, HIV, and sexually transmitted infection prevention. Topics include assessment, health education and behavior change theory, logic models, science-based programs, adaptation and fidelity, characteristics of promising programs, and process and outcome evaluation. Additional topics include the benefits of using science-based approaches, ten steps for getting to outcomes, and training and technical assistance.

Contact: Healthy Teen Network, 1501 Saint Paul Street, Suite 124, Baltimore, MD 21202, Telephone: (410) 685-0410 Fax: (410) 687-0481 E-mail: info@healthyteennetwork.org Web Site: http://www.healthyteennetwork.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent pregnancy prevention, Assessment, Behavior modification, HIV, Health behavior, Health education, Methods, Models, Outcome evaluation, Prevention programs, Process evaluation, Sexually transmitted diseases

Women's Preventive Services Initiative. 2016. Final report to the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Health Resources & Services Administration: Recommendations for preventive services for women (abridged report). Washington, DC: American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists, 33 pp.

Annotation: This document presents recommendations for women's preventive health care services. Topics include breast cancer screening for average-risk women, breastfeeding services and supplies, screening for cervical cancer, contraception and contraceptive counseling, screening for gestational diabetes mellitus, screening for human immunodeficiency virus, screening for interpersonal and domestic violence, counseling for sexually transmitted infections, and well-woman preventive visits.

Contact: American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists, 409 12th Street S.W., P.O. Box 96920, Washington, DC 20090-6920, Telephone: (202) 638-5577 Secondary Telephone: (202) 863-2518 E-mail: resources@acog.org Web Site: http://www.acog.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Breast cancer, Breastfeeding, Cervical cancer, Contraception, Counseling, Domestic violence, Gestational diabetes, Guidelines, HIV screening, Health screening, Health services delivery, Interpersonal violence, Preventive health services, Sexually transmitted diseases, Women's health

Healthy Youth Development Prevention Research Center. 2016. 2016 Minnesota adolescent sexual health report. Minneapolis, MN: University of Minnesota, Division of General Pediatrics and Adolescent Health, 5 pp.

Annotation: This report provides information about the sexual health of adolescents in Minnesota. Contents include adolescent pregnancy and birth statistics for the period 1990–2014, including information about trends in adolescent pregnancy and birth, national comparison, and subsequent births. Additional topics include geographic and racial/ethnic disparities in adolescent pregnancy, birth, and sexually transmitted infections; sexual orientation; and adverse childhood experiences.

Contact: University of Minnesota, Division of General Pediatrics and Adolescent Health, Department of Pediatrics, 717 Delaware Street, S.E., 3rd Floor, Minneapolis, MN 55414-2959, Telephone: (612) 626-2134 Fax: (612) 6264-0997 Web Site: https://www.pediatrics.umn.edu/divisions/general-pediatrics-and-adolescent-health Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent pregnancy, Adolescents, Childbirth, Ethnic factors, Geographic factors, Health disparities, Minnesota, Risk taking, Sexual health, Sexually transmitted diseases, Statistical data, Trends

National Center for HIV/AIDS, Viral Hepatitis, STD, and TB Prevention, Division of Adolescent and School Health. 2016. CDC Division of Adolescent and School Health DASH strategic plan for fiscal years 2015–2020. Atlanta, GA: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 44 pp.

Annotation: This document presents a strategic framework and 5-year plan for maximizing opportunities for primary prevention of HIV and other sexually transmitted infections and pregnancy among adolescents. Contents include the history of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Division of Adolescent and School Health (DASH); information about adolescent health and schools as a venue for health promotion and disease prevention among adolescents; and DASH's mission, approach, vision, goals, core business, strategic imperatives, objectives and indicators, strategies and activities, and strategic feedback loop. The appendices contain information about school-based surveillance systems, middle and high school sexual health education topic indicators, and DASH's research agenda.

Contact: National Center for HIV/AIDS, Viral Hepatits, STD, and TB Prevention, Division of Adolescent and School Health, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 4770 Buford Highway, N.E., Mailstop K-29, Atlanta, GA 30341-3724, Telephone: 800-232-4636 Secondary Telephone: (888) 232-6348 E-mail: cdcinfo@cdc.gov Web Site: http://www.cdc.gov/healthyyouth Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent health, Adolescent pregnancy prevention, Federal initiatives, HIV, Health promotion, Primary prevention, School health education, Schools, Sexual health, Sexually transmitted diseases, Strategic plans

National Center for HIV/AIDS, Viral Hepatitis, STD, and TB Prevention, Division of Adolescent and School Health. 2016. Developing a scope and sequence for sexual health education. Atlanta, GA: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 15 pp.

Annotation: This document describes how to determine the sexual health content and skills that should be taught at each grade level within a school health education curriculum framework to lower students' risk of HIV and other sexually transmitted infections, and unplanned pregnancy. Contents include guidance on using the Health Education Curriculum Analysis Tool (HECAT) to inform the breadth and arrangement of key health topics and concepts across grade levels (scope) and the logical progression of essential health knowledge, skills, and behaviors to be addressed at each grade level (sequence) from pre-kindergarten through the 12th grade. Additional contents include steps to create or revise a sexual health scope and sequence using the HECAT. A brief overview that explains what a scope and sequence is and what it is meant to accomplish is also available.

Contact: National Center for HIV/AIDS, Viral Hepatits, STD, and TB Prevention, Division of Adolescent and School Health, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 4770 Buford Highway, N.E., Mailstop K-29, Atlanta, GA 30341-3724, Telephone: 800-232-4636 Secondary Telephone: (888) 232-6348 E-mail: cdcinfo@cdc.gov Web Site: http://www.cdc.gov/healthyyouth Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent health, Adolescent pregnancy prevention, Curriculum development, HIV, Primary prevention, School districts, School health education, Schools, Sexual health, Sexually transmitted diseases

New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene. 2016. Sexual and reproductive health care best practices for adolescents and adults. New York, NY: New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene, 24 pp.

Annotation: This guide for health care professionals in multiple settings describes best practices for sexual and reproductive health, with a focus on contraceptive care and the prevention, screening, and testing of sexually transmitted infections (STI) and HIV. Contents include information about leading with a sexual and reproductive justice approach; policy and practice recommendations; and best practices specific to the primary care and prenatal, labor and delivery, and postpartum care settings. Additional contents include tools and resources on topics such as contraception care and provision, STI and HIV prevention and treatment, adolescent health care, patient-centered care and the sexual and reproductive justice framework, LGBTQ health care, intimate partner violence and reproductive coercion, health insurance access, and financial assistance and device reimbursement.

Contact: New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene, 2 Lafayette Street, 20th Floor, CN-65, New York, NY 10007, Telephone: (212) 676-2188 E-mail: http://www.nyc.gov/html/mail/html/maildoh.html Web Site: http://www1.nyc.gov/site/doh/index.page Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent health, Contraception, Contraceptive use, Culturally competent services, Family planning, Health promotion, Preventive health services, Primary care, Program improvement, Quality assurance, Reproductive health, Service integration, Sexual health, Sexually transmitted diseases

Sexuality Information and Education Council of the United States. 2015. State profiles fiscal year 2014: A portrait of sexuality education and abstinence-only-until-marriage programs in the states. New York, NY: Sexuality Information and Education Council of the United States,

Annotation: These resources for advocates, educators, policymakers, public health professionals, parents, youth, and community stakeholders comprise profiles of sexuality education and abstinence-only-until-marriage programs in the United States. Topics include federal funding by state, total federal spending on abstinence-only-until-marriage programs, sexuality and HIV/STD education policies by state, and descriptions of evidence-based and comprehensive approaches to pregnancy-, STD-, HIV/AIDS-prevention and sexuality education programs.

Contact: Sexuality Information and Education Council of the United States, 90 John Street Suite 402, New York, NY 10038, Telephone: (212) 819-9770 Fax: (212) 819-9776 E-mail: siecus@siecus.org Web Site: http://www.siecus.org Available from the website.

Keywords: AIDS, Abstinence, Federal MCH programs, Government financing, HIV, Model programs, Prevention programs, Sexual health, Sexuality education, Sexually transmitted diseases, State MCH programs

U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Office of Adolescent Health and Family and Youth Services Bureau. 2014-. Teen pregnancy prevention evidence review. Washington, DC: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, 1 v.

Annotation: This website provides information and resources from an ongoing independent systematic review of the adolescent pregnancy prevention research to identify programs with evidence of effectiveness in reducing adolescent pregnancy, sexually transmitted infections, and associated sexual risk behaviors. The website includes information on study quality and program models that have demonstrated positive impacts on sexual risk behavior and sexual health outcomes. Contents include a searchable database of studies included in the review, information about the review process and how the review is conducted, publications written by the review team, answers to frequently asked questions, and contact information for the study team.

Contact: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Office of the Assistant Secretary for Planning and Evaluation, Hubert H. Humphrey Building, 200 Independence Avenue, S.W., Room 415 F, Washington, DC 20201, Web Site: http://aspe.hhs.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent health, Adolescent pregnancy, Adolescents, Health behavior, Literature reviews, Prevention programs, Program models, Research methodology, Risk factors, Sexual health, Sexually transmitted diseases

National Institute for Health Care Management Foundation. 2014. Missed opportunities to prevent cervical cancer: Strategies to increase HPV vaccination. Washington, DC: National Institute for Health Care Management Foundation, 3 pp. (Fact sheet: Women, children and adolescents)

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. 2014. Preexposure prophylaxis for the prevention of HIV infection in the United States: 2014. Atlanta, GA: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 67 pp. (A clinical practice guideline)

Annotation: This publication provides a comprehensive clinical practice guideline for the use of preexposure prophylaxis (PrEP) for the prevention of HIV infection in the United States. Contents include evidence of need for additional HIV prevention methods; evidence of safety and efficacy of antiretroviral prophylaxis; identifying indications for PrEP; providing PrEP; people with documented HIV infection; discontinuing PrEP; special clinical considerations including women who become pregnant or breastfeed while taking PrEP medication; improving medication adherence; reducing HIV risk behaviors; financial case-management issues for PrEP; decision support, training, and technical assistance; and related guidelines.

Contact: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 1600 Clifton Road, Atlanta, GA 30329-4027, Telephone: (800) 232-4636 Secondary Telephone: (888) 232-6348 E-mail: cdcinfo@cdc.gov Web Site: http://www.cdc.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Guidelines, HIV, Preventive medicine, Sexually transmitted diseases

U.S. Preventive Services Task Force. 2014. Sexually transmitted infections: Behavioral counseling. Rockville, MD: U.S. Preventive Services Task Force, multiple items.

Laudenbach JM, Frediani R. 2014. Human papillomavirus vaccination for the prevention of oropharyngeal cancer in the United States: A cost-benefit analysis. Pomona, CA: Center for Oral Health, 7 pp.

Annotation: This brief describes the potential relationship between the benefits of human papillomavirus (HPV) immunization and the costs of oropharyngeal cancer in the United States. Contents include information about oral HPV infection and HPV vaccination; an economic cost-benefit analysis; and conclusions.

Contact: Center for Oral Health, 309 East Second Street, Pomona, CA 91766-1854, Telephone: (909) 469-8300 Fax: (510) 380-6637 E-mail: info@tc4oh.org Web Site: http://www.centerfororalhealth.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Cost effectiveness, Economics, Human papillomavirus, Immunization, Oral health, Policy development, Sexually transmitted diseases, Vaccination effects, Vaccines

U.S. Office of Minority Health Resource Center. (2013). Preconception peer educator. Washington, DC: U.S. Office of Minority Health Resource Center,

Annotation: This CD-ROM and the web site contain materials for use in training college students who serve as peer educators on college campuses and in the community to raise awareness about health disparities, specifically infant mortality rates among African American babies. Topics include health disparities and minority health; infant mortality; African American health status and its impact on infant mortality; what research says about preconception health, infant mortality and prematurity; preconception care; HIV, sexually transmitted diseases, and preconception health; and what a man would do. At completion of training, the Office of Minority Health and partners will link students with Healthy Start Programs, state/city health departments, state offices of minority health, and community based organizations for placement in summer internships, volunteer, or paid work opportunities.

Contact: U.S. Office of Minority Health Resource Center, P.O. Box 37337, Washington, DC 20013-7337, Telephone: (800) 444-6472 Secondary Telephone: (301) 251-1432 Fax: (301) 251-2160 E-mail: info@minorityhealth.hhs.gov Web Site: http://minorityhealth.hhs.gov/omh/browse.aspx?lvl=1&lvlid=3 Available from the website.

Keywords: Blacks, Health status disparities, Infant mortality, Minority health, Peer education, Preconception care, Sexually transmitted diseases, Training materials, Young women

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. 2013. HPV vaccine for preteens and teens. [Atlanta, GA]: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention,

Annotation: This website presents information about the human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine for male and female adolescents and young adults (ages 11-26). It explains when and how many shots are recommended, discusses what HPV is, and provides links to related information and resources.

Contact: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 1600 Clifton Road, Atlanta, GA 30329-4027, Telephone: (800) 232-4636 Secondary Telephone: (888) 232-6348 E-mail: cdcinfo@cdc.gov Web Site: http://www.cdc.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent health, Human papillomavirus, Disease prevention, Immunization, Sexually transmitted diseases, Young adults

Colman S, Dee TS, Joyce TJ. 2013. Do parental involvement laws deter risky teen sex?. Cambridge, MA: National Bureau of Economic Research, 43 pp. (NBER working paper series no. 18810)

Annotation: This paper addresses the question of whether laws requiring that physicians notify or obtain consent from a parent of a minor seeking an abortion before performing the procedure deter risky adolescent sexual behavior. Drawing on multiple data sources, the paper seeks to reconcile the disparate findings in the existing literature and to provide new and comprehensive evidence on the association between parental involvement (PI) laws and rates of sexually transmitted infections (STIs) in adolescents. Topics include abortion access and risky sexual activity among adolescents, data and samples, methods, and estimated impacts of PI laws on STIs.

Contact: National Bureau of Economic Research, 1050 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, MA 02138-5398, Telephone: (617) 868-3900 Fax: (617) 868-2742 E-mail: info@nber.org Web Site: http://www.nber.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Abortion, Access to health care, Adolescent behavior, Adolescent sexuality, Consent, Health services, Parents, Legislation, Prevention, Risk taking, Sexually transmitted diseases, Statistical data

U.S. Office of Minority Health. 2013. The Circle of Life multimedia program. [Rockville. MD]: U.S. Office of Minority Health,

Annotation: This website presents the Circle of Life multimedia program, a curriculum intended for American Indian/Alaska Native middle school students that is based on the medicine wheel, a teaching symbol about mental, physical, spiritual, and emotional wellness. This holistic health promotion model is meant to help students learn about making healthy choices to prevent disease such as HIV/AIDS. The curriculum is divided into seven chapter sessions that are 20-25 minutes each and is presented in a modular form that can be broken up or used in sequence either in or outside the classroom. Teacher notes and an accessible version of the curriculum are also available on the website.

Contact: U.S. Office of Minority Health, The Tower Building, 1101 Wootton Parkway, Suite 600, Rockville, MD 20852, Telephone: (240) 453-2882 Secondary Telephone: (240) 453-2883 Fax: (240) 453-2883 E-mail: info@minorityhealth.hhs.gov Web Site: http://www.minorityhealth.hhs.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: AIDS, Adolescent attitudes, Adolescent behavior, Adolescent health, Adolescent sexuality, Alaska natives, American Indians, Child health, Curricula, Educational materials, HIV, Middle school students, Prevention, Sexually transmitted diseases

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Division of Sexually Transmitted Disease Prevention. 2013. Talking to adolescents and young adults about sexually transmitted infections. Atlanta, GA: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Division of Sexually Transmitted Disease Prevention, 1 video (5 min.). (CDC expert commentary)

Annotation: This April 22, 2013, podcast for health care providers discusses sexually transmitted disease testing (STD) recommendations for adolescents and youth, as well as how STDs impact this group. The website contains the video and a written transcript.

Contact: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 1600 Clifton Road, Atlanta, GA 30329-4027, Telephone: (800) 232-4636 Secondary Telephone: (888) 232-6348 E-mail: cdcinfo@cdc.gov Web Site: http://www.cdc.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescents, Audiovisual materials, Screening, Sexually transmitted diseases, Youth

    Next Page »

This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number U02MC31613, MCH Advanced Education Policy, $3.5 M. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.