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Strengthening the evidence for maternal and child health programs

Search Results: MCHLine

Items in this list may be obtained from the sources cited. Contact information reflects the most current data about the source that has been provided to the MCH Digital Library.


Displaying records 1 through 12 (12 total).

Keith J. n.d.. Family-Focused Strategy for Reducing Premature and Unprotected Sexual Activity Among Minority Youth in School-Based Health Clinics [Final report]. Dallas, TX: Dallas County Hospital District, 26 pp.

Annotation: The purpose of this project was to develop and demonstrate effective intervention strategies for the 10–15 year age group that can be carried out within a school-based comprehensive health care system to reduce the occurrence of premature and unprotected sexual intercourse in adolescents. More than 300 10-year-old children and their parents enrolled to receive annual health maintenance evaluations and a series of activities to enhance parent-child communication, parental knowledge of adolescent social and sexual development, and problem-solving and decision-making skills. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Technical Information Service, U.S. Department of Commerce, 5301 Shawnee Road, Alexandria, VA 22312, Telephone: (703) 605-6050 Secondary Telephone: (888) 584-8332 E-mail: customerservice@ntis.gov Web Site: http://www.ntis.gov Document Number: NTIS PB99-133977.

Keywords: Adolescents, Blacks, Decision Making Skills, Healthy Tomorrows Partnership for Children, Hispanics, Minority Groups, Parent Child Interaction, Parent Child Relationship, Preventive Health Care Education, School Dropouts, School Health Programs, School Health Services, Sexual Activity, Sexually Transmitted Diseases

Kann L, Olsen EO, McManus T, Harris WA, Shanklin SL, Flint KH, Queen B, Lowry R, Chyen D, Whittle L, Thornton J, Lim C, Yamakawa Y, Brenner N, Zaza S. 2016. Sexual identify, sex of sexual contacts, and health-related behaviors among students in grades 9–12: United States and selected sites, 2015. MMWR Surveillance Summaries 65(9):1–202,

Annotation: This report summarizes results for 118 health-related behaviors plus obesity, overweight, and asthma by sexual identity and sex of sexual contacts from the 2015 national Youth Risk Behavior Survey, 25 state surveys, and 19 large urban school district surveys conducted among students in grades 9–12. Contents include a description of the Youth Risk Behavior Surveillance System, survey methodology, and survey results for the prevalence of health-risk behaviors among sexual minority students compared with nonsexual minority students. Recommendations for reducing disparities in health-risk behaviors among sexual minority students are also included.

Contact: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 1600 Clifton Road, Atlanta, GA 30329-4027, Telephone: (800) 232-4636 Secondary Telephone: (888) 232-6348 E-mail: cdcinfo@cdc.gov Web Site: http://www.cdc.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent health, Adolescent sexuality, Adolescents, Comparative analysis, Health behavior, Health surveys, Individual characteristics, Minority groups, National surveys, Population surveillance, Prevalence, Risk factors, Risk taking, School districts, School surveys, Sex factors, Sexual behavior, Sexual health, Sexual identity, Sexual partners, State surveys, Statistical data, Urban population

Littrell J. 2015. Human trafficking in America's schools. Washington, DC: U.S. Department of Education, 13 pp.

Annotation: This guide is designed to assist school officials in understanding how human trafficking impacts schools; recognizing the indicators of possible child trafficking; and developing policies, protocols, and partnerships to address and prevent the exploitation of children. Topics include child sex trafficking, child labor trafficking, deconstructing perceptions and a victim-centered approach, risk factors and predictors, what to do about suspected trafficking, recruitment, impact on learning environment, and community involvement. The guide contains a sample protocol for school districts and describes U.S. government entities combating human trafficking, publications and resources, training, services, and terms and definitions.

Contact: National Center on Safe Supportive Learning Environments, American Institutes for Research, 1000 Thomas Jefferson Street, N.W., Washington, DC 20007, Telephone: (202) 403-5000 Fax: (202) 403-5001 Web Site: http://safesupportivelearning.ed.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Child labor, Child sexual abuse, Community action, Learning, Policy development, Protective factors, Protocols, Public private partnerships, Resources for professionals, Risk factors, School age children, Schools, Training

White House Task Force to Protect Students from Sexual Assault. 2014. Not alone: The first report of the White House Task Force to Protect Students from Sexual Assault. [Washington, DC]: White House Task Force to Protect Students from Sexual Assault, 20 pp.

Annotation: This report presents action steps and recommendations from a federal task force to protect students from sexual violence. Topics include using campus climate surveys to identify problems; preventing sexual assault on campus; responding effectively when a student is sexually assaulted; and improving the federal government's enforcement efforts, and making them more transparent.

Keywords: Community action, Crime prevention, Federal initiatives, Injury prevention, Interpersonal violence, Judicial actions, Policy development, Program improvement, Public private partnerships, Schools, Sexual assault, Students, Surveys, Training, Trauma, Violence prevention

Wildsmith E, Barry M, Manlov J, Vaughn B. 2013. Dating and sexual relationships. [Bethesda, MD]: Child Trends, 10 pp. (Adolescent health highlight)

Annotation: This report presents key research findings about the prevalence of and trends in adolescents' dating and sexual relationships. Additional topics include dating and sexual behaviors that may put adolescents at risk for negative outcomes; how these behaviors vary by gender, age, and race/ethnicity; and individual, family, and media influences on adolescents' sexual behaviors.

Contact: Child Trends, 7315 Wisconsin Avenue, Suite 1200 W, Bethesda, MD 20814, Telephone: (240) 223-9200 E-mail: Web Site: http://www.childtrends.org Available from the website. Document Number: Pub. no. 2013-04.

Keywords: Adolescents, Environmental influences, Relationships, Risk factors, Sexual behavior, Sexual development, Sexual health, Sexual partners

Henry J. Kaiser Family Foundation. 2005. U.S. teen sexual activity. Menlo Park, CA: Henry J. Kaiser Family Foundation, 2 pp.

Annotation: This fact sheet provides statistical information on adolescent sexual activity. Topics include: general sexual activity; first sexual intercourse; sexual partners and relationships; abstinence; contraceptive and protection; pregnancy and sexually transmitted diseases (STDs); sex and substance abuse; sexual pressure, assault and dating violence; and access to health care services. Major national data sets on teen sexual activity in the U.S. are identified.

Contact: Henry J. Kaiser Family Foundation, 2400 Sand Hill Road, Menlo Park, CA 94025, Telephone: (650) 854-9400 Secondary Telephone: (202) 347-5270 Fax: (650) 854-4800 Web Site: http://www.kff.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescents, Assault, Contraception, Dating, Peer pressure, Sexual behavior, Sexual health, Sexual intercourse, Sexual partners, Sexually transmitted diseases, Statistics, Violence

Feijoo AN. 2004. Trends in sexual risk behaviors among high school students: United States 1991 to 1997 and 1999 to 2003. Washington, DC: Advocates for Youth, 4 pp. (The facts)

Annotation: This report presents the results of an independent analysis of trends in four adolescent sexual behaviors measured by the Youth Risk Behavior Surveillance System: (1) ever had sexual intercourse, (2) had four or more sexual partners during lifetime, (3) currently sexually active, and (4) condom use during last sexual intercourse. The results are presented in tabular forms, with brief textual summaries. A conclusion and references are included.

Contact: Advocates for Youth, 2000 M Street, N.W., Suite 750, Washington, DC 20036, Telephone: (202) 419-3420 Fax: (202) 419-1448 Web Site: http://www.advocatesforyouth.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent behavior, Adolescent sexuality, Condoms, Sexual intercourse, Sexual partners, Statistics, Trends

Ryan S, Manlove J, Franzetta K. 2003. The first time: Characteristics of teens' first sexual relationships. Washington, DC: Child Trends, 8 pp. (Research brief)

Annotation: This research brief provides a picture of 12- through 18-year-olds who report a first sexual relationship. Using data from the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health, the brief presents information that is relationship specific. It includes an overview, a section on the relationship and the partner, a summary and discussion section, and a conclusion.Statistical information is presented in figures throughout the brief. The brief also includes a list of endnotes.

Contact: Child Trends, 7315 Wisconsin Avenue, Suite 1200 W, Bethesda, MD 20814, Telephone: (240) 223-9200 E-mail: Web Site: http://www.childtrends.org Available at no charge; also available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent attitudes, Adolescent behavior, Adolescent sexuality, Relationships, Sexual partners

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, HIV/AIDS Prevention Research Synthesis Project. 2001. Compendium of HIV prevention interventions with evidence of effectiveness. (Rev. ed.). Atlanta, GA: Division of HIV/AIDS Prevention - Intervention Research and Support, National Center for HIV, STD, and TB Prevention, ca. 60 pp.

Annotation: This compendium summarizes studies about intervention programs with evidence of successfully reducing sex- and/or drug-related risks, and rates of HIV and STD infections. Interventions are outlined in the following categories: drug users, heterosexual adults, men who have sex with men, and youth. Each entry provides a description of the program and information on the intervention goal and setting, population, comparison condition, behavioral findings, and program contacts. An intervention checklist listing elements of successful programs is provided for local programs to use in rating their own interventions. Appendix A describes in detail the criteria used to select the interventions. Appendix B contains source citations and supplemental references for the 24 intervention studies described in the compendium.

Contact: National Center for HIV/AIDS, Viral Hepatitis, STD, and TB Prevention, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 1600 Clifton Road, Atlanta, GA 30329-4027, Telephone: (800) 232-4636 Secondary Telephone: (888) 232-6348 E-mail: cdcinfo@cdc.gov Web Site: http://www.cdc.gov/nchhstp Available from the website.

Keywords: AIDS, Disease prevention, Evidence based medicine, HIV, Health education, Infection control, Program descriptions, Risk taking, Sexual partners, Sexually transmitted diseases

American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists, and Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Work Group on the Prevention of Violence During Pregnancy. 2000. Intimate partner violence during pregnancy: A guide for clinicians. Washington, DC: American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists, 74 pp., 1 CD-ROM.

Annotation: This slide lecture presentation is designed as a training tool for clinicians to increase understanding of the important role they can play in identifying, preventing, and reducing intimate partner violence. The slide set also emphasizes the critical window of opportunity that prenatal care provides for the screening and referral of pregnant women. The publication provides tips on using the slide presentation as part of a strategy to increase screening by clinicians, gives learning objectives, and shows the text of each slide with a script of additional information to be given to the presentation audience by the presenter. The CD-ROM contains the text of the PowerPoint slides.

Contact: National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Division of Reproductive Health, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 1600 Clifton Road, Atlanta, GA 30329-4027, Telephone: (800) 232-4636 Secondary Telephone: (888) 232-6348 E-mail: cdcinfo@cdc.gov Web Site: http://www.cdc.gov/reproductivehealth Available from the website.

Keywords: CD-ROMs, Prenatal care, Prevention, Professional training, Screening, Sexual partners, Violence

Frothingham T. [1997]. Mental Health Treatment for Sexually Abused Children [Final report]. Durham, NC: Duke University, 23 pp. (xxx)

Annotation: Sexually abused children often have poor mental health. In north central North Carolina, access to appropriate mental health services fails for more than half of the children identified as sexually abused. This 5-year project sought to improve access to appropriate mental health services as well as the mental health and behavioral status of these children and their caretakers. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Keywords: Child Sexual Abuse, Families, Healthy Tomorrows Partnership for Children, Mental Health Services

U.S. Health Resources and Services Administration, Bureau of Primary Health Care. 1997. MOM's Project: Strategy transfer guide—Models that work. Bethesda, MD: U.S. Health Resources and Services Administration, Bureau of Primary Health Care, 34 pp.

   

This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number U02MC31613, MCH Advanced Education Policy, $3.5 M. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.