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Strengthening the evidence for maternal and child health programs

Search Results: MCHLine

Items in this list may be obtained from the sources cited. Contact information reflects the most current data about the source that has been provided to the MCH Digital Library.


Displaying records 1 through 20 (314 total).

Milner-Fenwick. n.d.. Teen contraception. Timonium, MD: Milner-Fenwick, 1 videotape (13:30 minutes, VHS 1/2 inch). (Video counseling library)

Annotation: This videotape dispels common myths about contraception and describes a range of contraceptive options available today, including Norplant, Depro-Provera, and abstinence. It discusses the importance of using condoms in conjunction with other contraceptives to prevent sexually transmitted diseases. The information is presented by adolescents in a non-judgmental fashion; it does contain some explicit scenes. The videotape is available in English and Spanish.

Contact: Milner-Fenwick, 2125 Greenspring Drive, Timonium, MD 21093-3113, Telephone: (800) 432-8433 Secondary Telephone: (410) 252-1700 Fax: (410) 252-6316 E-mail: patiented@milner-fenwick.com Web Site: http://www.milner-fenwick.com/index.asp $250.00. Document Number: OB-130.

Keywords: Abstinence, Adolescent health, Adolescents, Audiovisual materials, Condoms, Contraception, Educational materials, Sexually transmitted diseases, Spanish language materials, Videotapes

Great Expectations/Healthy Start. n.d.. Prenatal education curriculum. New Orleans, LA: Great Expectations/Healthy Start, ca. 150 pp.

Annotation: This study guide consists of a series of brief training sessions on various aspects of prenatal and infant care. Curricula topics include the following: 1) anatomy and physiology of pregnancy; 2) breastfeeding; 3) alcohol, smoking, and drug abuse; 4) personal hygiene; 5) sexually transmitted diseases; 6) contraception/family planning; and 7) domestic violence. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: Great Expectations Foundation, Inc., 4298 Elysian Fields Avenue, Suite B, New Orleans, LA 70122, Telephone: (504) 288-7818 Fax: (504) 288-7328 E-mail: arichard@greatexp.org Web Site: Available at no charge.

Keywords: Adolescent pregnancy, Alcohol use during pregnancy, Breastfeeding, Contraception, Curricula, Domestic violence, Educational materials, Great Expectations/New Orleans Healthy Start, Infant care, Infant health, Nutrition, Pregnancy, Prenatal care, Prenatal education, Prenatal nutrition, Sexually transmitted diseases, Smoking, Substance dependence, Training materials

Keith J. n.d.. Family-Focused Strategy for Reducing Premature and Unprotected Sexual Activity Among Minority Youth in School-Based Health Clinics [Final report]. Dallas, TX: Dallas County Hospital District, 26 pp.

Annotation: The purpose of this project was to develop and demonstrate effective intervention strategies for the 10–15 year age group that can be carried out within a school-based comprehensive health care system to reduce the occurrence of premature and unprotected sexual intercourse in adolescents. More than 300 10-year-old children and their parents enrolled to receive annual health maintenance evaluations and a series of activities to enhance parent-child communication, parental knowledge of adolescent social and sexual development, and problem-solving and decision-making skills. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Technical Information Service, U.S. Department of Commerce, 5301 Shawnee Road, Alexandria, VA 22312, Telephone: (703) 605-6050 Secondary Telephone: (888) 584-8332 E-mail: customerservice@ntis.gov Web Site: http://www.ntis.gov Document Number: NTIS PB99-133977.

Keywords: Adolescents, Blacks, Decision Making Skills, Healthy Tomorrows Partnership for Children, Hispanics, Minority Groups, Parent Child Interaction, Parent Child Relationship, Preventive Health Care Education, School Dropouts, School Health Programs, School Health Services, Sexual Activity, Sexually Transmitted Diseases

Piper D. n.d.. Project Model Health [Final report]. Madison, WI: Wisconsin Division of Health, 75 pp.

Annotation: Project Model Health (PMH) was an innovative adolescent health promotion project targeting students in grades 7-9. PMH had behavioral objectives in the areas of nutrition, marijuana use, drinking and driving, tobacco use, and sexuality. The strategies used during 32-37 hours of classroom instruction were taken from recent research on effective adolescent health promotion and substance abuse prevention programming. The strategies included: use of college-age role models as instructors; focus on analyzing media messages; practice of peer refusal skills; feedback of peer norm information; emphasis on short-term effects of behavior; use of public commitments; and health advocacy behavior. The evaluation of PMH included extensive, qualitative process evaluation examining the actual implementation of the program as well as a quasi-experimental outcome evaluation. Assuming future follow-up fails to show significant outcome differences between instructor-led and teacher-led PMH, it was recommended to use carefully selected teachers rather than college-age instructors. Based on these promising results, further implementation and evaluation of the PMH approach and curriculum was recommended. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Technical Information Service, U.S. Department of Commerce, 5301 Shawnee Road, Alexandria, VA 22312, Telephone: (703) 605-6050 Secondary Telephone: (888) 584-8332 E-mail: customerservice@ntis.gov Web Site: http://www.ntis.gov Document Number: NTIS PB92-103316.

Keywords: Adolescent health, Adolescents, Health promotion, Impaired driving, Marijuana, Nutrition, Sexuality, Tobacco use

Puritz A, Carmody MA. n.d.. Sexuality and children and youth with special health care needs: Information and education. Washington, DC: D.C. Resource Center for Children with Special Health Care Needs, 3 pp. (Fact sheet)

D.C. Resource Center for Children with Special Health Care Needs. n.d.. Sexuality information resource list. Washington, DC: D.C. Resource Center for Children with Special Health Care Needs, 3 pp.

Annotation: This fact sheet lists resources on sexuality education, education curricula, health conditions and disabilities, online learning, educators and counselors, and national resources related to sexuality and children and adults with disabilities. Resources also cover parenting with a disability, reproductive health, sexual violence, and screening for abuse or violence.

Contact: D.C. Resource Center for Children with Special Health Care Needs, Washington, DC Web Site: http://dccshcn.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescents with special health care needs, Adults, Children with special health care needs, Disabilities, Sexuality education

Healthy Teen Network and ETR Associates. n.d.. Weaving science & practice: Frequently asked questions about science-based approaches. Baltimore, MD: Healthy Teen Network, 20 pp.

Annotation: This document describes seven science-based approaches in adolescent pregnancy, HIV, and sexually transmitted infection prevention. Topics include assessment, health education and behavior change theory, logic models, science-based programs, adaptation and fidelity, characteristics of promising programs, and process and outcome evaluation. Additional topics include the benefits of using science-based approaches, ten steps for getting to outcomes, and training and technical assistance.

Contact: Healthy Teen Network, 1501 Saint Paul Street, Suite 124, Baltimore, MD 21202, Telephone: (410) 685-0410 Fax: (410) 687-0481 E-mail: info@healthyteennetwork.org Web Site: http://www.healthyteennetwork.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent pregnancy prevention, Assessment, Behavior modification, HIV, Health behavior, Health education, Methods, Models, Outcome evaluation, Prevention programs, Process evaluation, Sexually transmitted diseases

Hagan JF Jr. 2019. Making Bright Futures work: How evidence, the periodicity schedule, and the Bright Futures guidelines impact practice. Itasca, IL: American Academy of Pediatrrics, 1 video (58 min.).

Annotation: This video reviews new clinical content in the Bright Futures Guidelines and the associated Periodicity Schedule, and discusses how to use evidence to decide on content for your practice's health supervision visits and how to identify strategies, tools, and resources to maximize efficiency for health promotion and preventive services.

Contact: American Academy of Pediatrics, 345 Park Boulevard, Itasca, IL 60143, Telephone: (630) 626-6000 Secondary Telephone: (847) 434-4000 Fax: (847) 434-8000 Web Site: https://www.aap.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent development, Adolescent health, Anticipatory guidance, Child development, Child health, Communities, Disease prevention, Emotional development, Evidence based medicine, Families, Guidelines, Health promotion, Health screening, Health supervision, Infant development, Infant health, Injury prevention, Mental health, Nutrition, Oral health, Pediatric care, Perinatal health, Physical activity, Preventive health services, Protective factors, Psychosocial development, Safety, Sexual health, Standards, Videos, Weight management

Amercan Academy of Pediatrics. 2018. Bright Futures tool and resource kit (2nd ed.). Itasca, IL: Amercan Academy of Pediatrics,

Annotation: This companion to the most current edition of the Bright Futures Guidelines for Health Supervision of Infants, Children and Adolescents, the national standard for well-child care provides updated forms and materials relate to preventive health supervision and health screening for infants, children, and adolescents. These include pre-visit questionnaires, visit documentation forms, parent and patient handouts, supplemental education handouts, and medical screening reference tables.

Contact: American Academy of Pediatrics, 345 Park Boulevard, Itasca, IL 60143, Telephone: (630) 626-6000 Secondary Telephone: (847) 434-4000 Fax: (847) 434-8000 Web Site: https://www.aap.org

Keywords: Adolescent development, Adolescent health, Anticipatory guidance, Child development, Child health, Communities, Disease prevention, Emotional development, Families, Guidelines, Health promotion, Health screening, Health supervision, Infant development, Infant health, Injury prevention, Mental health, Nutrition, Oral health, Pediatric care, Perinatal health, Physical activity, Preventive health services, Professional resources, Protective factors, Psychosocial development, Safety, Sexual health, Standards, Weight management

Hagan JF, Shaw JS, Duncan PM, eds. 2017. Bright Futures: Guidelines for health supervision of infants, children, and adolescents–Pocket guide (4th ed.). Elk Grove Village, IL: American Academy of Pediatrics, 123 pp.

Annotation: These guidelines provide background information and recommendations for promoting the healthy development of infants, children, and adolescents from birth to age 21, as well as standards for health supervision visits. Topics include lifelong health for families and communities, family support, health for children and adolescents with special health care needs, development, mental health, weight, nutrition, physical activity, oral health, use of social media, and safety and injury prevention. A pocket guide is also available. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: American Academy of Pediatrics, 345 Park Boulevard, Itasca, IL 60143, Telephone: (630) 626-6000 Secondary Telephone: (847) 434-4000 Fax: (847) 434-8000 Web Site: https://www.aap.org $16.95, plus shipping and handling. Document Number: ISBN 978-1-61002-082-4.

Keywords: Adolescent development, Adolescent health, Anticipatory guidance, Child development, Child health, Communities, Disease prevention, Emotional development, Families, Guidelines, Health promotion, Health screening, Health supervision, Infant development, Infant health, Injury prevention, Mental health, Nutrition, Oral health, Pediatric care, Perinatal health, Physical activity, Preventive health services, Protective factors, Psychosocial development, Safety, Sexual health, Standards, Weight management

Epstein R, Gonzalez T. 2017. Gender & trauma: Somatic interventions for girls in juvenile justice–Implications for policy and practice. Washington, DC: Georgetown Law Center on Poverty and Inequality, 37 pp.

Annotation: This report provides a foundational understanding of the relationship between trauma and gender -- with a focus on system-involved girls -- and provides an analysis of somatic interventions. In particular, the report maps the ways in which trauma-informed, gender-responsive, and culturally competent yoga and mindfulness programs can address the short- and long-term impact of trauma on girls in the juvenile justice system. Topics include the core components of somatic interventions for traumatized girls, data documenting positive effects, and specific policy and practice recommendations to increase access for system-involved girls.

Contact: Georgetown Law, Center on Poverty and Inequality, 600 New Jersey Avenue, S.W., Washington, DC 20001, Telephone: (202) 661-6692 E-mail: povertycenter@law.georgetown.edu Web Site: http://www.law.georgetown.edu/academics/centers-institutes/poverty-inequality/index.cfm Available from the website.

Keywords: Access to health care, Adolescent females, Culturally competent services, Ethnic factors, Intervention, Juvenile justice, Policy development, Sexuality, Therapeutics, Trauma care

U.S. Health Resources and Services Administration. 2016. Women's preventive services: Required health plan coverage guidelines. [Rockville, MD]: U.S. Health Resources and Services Administration,

Annotation: This website provides information about required health plan coverage guidelines for women's preventive services under the Affordable Care Act. It includes a table listing type of preventive service, guidelines for health insurance coverage, and frequency of coverage. Preventive service types listed include well-woman visits, gestational diabetes screening, human papillomavirus testing, counseling for sexually transmitted infections, counseling and screening for human immune-deficiency virus, contraceptive methods and counseling, and screening and counseling for interpersonal and domestic violence.

Contact: U.S. Health Resources and Services Administration, 5600 Fishers Lane, Rockville, MD 20857, Telephone: (888) 275-4772 Secondary Telephone: (877) 464-4772 Fax: (301) 443-1246 E-mail: ask@hrsa.gov Web Site: http://www.hrsa.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Contraception, Counseling, Domestic violence, Gestational diabetes, HIV screening, Health care reform, Health insurance, Health services, Human papillomavirus, Interpersonal violence, Legislation, Prevention, Reproductive health, Screening, Sexually transmitted infections, Testing, Women's health

Kann L, Olsen EO, McManus T, Harris WA, Shanklin SL, Flint KH, Queen B, Lowry R, Chyen D, Whittle L, Thornton J, Lim C, Yamakawa Y, Brenner N, Zaza S. 2016. Sexual identify, sex of sexual contacts, and health-related behaviors among students in grades 9–12: United States and selected sites, 2015. MMWR Surveillance Summaries 65(9):1–202,

Annotation: This report summarizes results for 118 health-related behaviors plus obesity, overweight, and asthma by sexual identity and sex of sexual contacts from the 2015 national Youth Risk Behavior Survey, 25 state surveys, and 19 large urban school district surveys conducted among students in grades 9–12. Contents include a description of the Youth Risk Behavior Surveillance System, survey methodology, and survey results for the prevalence of health-risk behaviors among sexual minority students compared with nonsexual minority students. Recommendations for reducing disparities in health-risk behaviors among sexual minority students are also included.

Contact: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 1600 Clifton Road, Atlanta, GA 30329-4027, Telephone: (800) 232-4636 Secondary Telephone: (888) 232-6348 E-mail: cdcinfo@cdc.gov Web Site: http://www.cdc.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent health, Adolescent sexuality, Adolescents, Comparative analysis, Health behavior, Health surveys, Individual characteristics, Minority groups, National surveys, Population surveillance, Prevalence, Risk factors, Risk taking, School districts, School surveys, Sex factors, Sexual behavior, Sexual health, Sexual identity, Sexual partners, State surveys, Statistical data, Urban population

Women's Preventive Services Initiative. 2016. Final report to the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Health Resources & Services Administration: Recommendations for preventive services for women (abridged report). Washington, DC: American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists, 33 pp.

Annotation: This document presents recommendations for women's preventive health care services. Topics include breast cancer screening for average-risk women, breastfeeding services and supplies, screening for cervical cancer, contraception and contraceptive counseling, screening for gestational diabetes mellitus, screening for human immunodeficiency virus, screening for interpersonal and domestic violence, counseling for sexually transmitted infections, and well-woman preventive visits.

Contact: American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists, 409 12th Street S.W., P.O. Box 96920, Washington, DC 20090-6920, Telephone: (202) 638-5577 Secondary Telephone: (202) 863-2518 E-mail: resources@acog.org Web Site: http://www.acog.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Breast cancer, Breastfeeding, Cervical cancer, Contraception, Counseling, Domestic violence, Gestational diabetes, Guidelines, HIV screening, Health screening, Health services delivery, Interpersonal violence, Preventive health services, Sexually transmitted diseases, Women's health

Smith KV, Dye C, Rotz D, Cook E, Rosinsky K, Scott M. 2016. Final impacts of the Gender Matters Program. Washington, DC: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Office of Adolescent Health, 38 pp.

Annotation: This report presents findings from a large-scale demonstration project and evaluation of Gender Matters (Gen.M), a sexuality education curriculum that aims to reduce adolescent pregnancy and associated sexual risk behaviors, in part by challenging commonly held perceptions of gender roles and promoting healthy, equitable relationships. The study reports final impacts of the program on adolescent sexual risk behaviors and other longer-term outcomes measured 18 months after participants enrolled in the study.

Contact: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Office of Adolescent Health, 1101 Wootton Parkway, Suite 700, Rockville, MD 20852, Telephone: (240) 453-2846 E-mail: oah.gov@hhs.gov Web Site: http://www.hhs.gov/ash/oah Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent health, Adolescent pregnancy, Adolescents, Attitudes, Gender discrimination, Model programs, Prevention programs, Program evaluation, Relationships, Risk taking, Sex characteristics, Sexual health

Michigan State Board of Education. 2016. State Board of Education statement and guidance on safe and supportive learning environments for lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and questioning (LGBTQ) students. Lansing, MI: Michigan Department of Education, 9 pp.

Annotation: These voluntary guidelines are intended to support schools in creating an inclusive environment for all students in Michigan. Contents include best practice strategies for school districts to create a supportive learning environment with specific guidance on supporting transgender and gender nonconforming students. Definitions are included.

Contact: Michigan State Board of Education, 608 W. Allegan Street, Lansing, MI 48909, Telephone: (517) 373-3324 Web Site: http://www.michigan.gov/mde/0,4615,7-140-5373---,00.html Available from the website.

Keywords: Bullying, Child health, Child safety, Civil rights, Health promotion, Homosexuality, Injury prevention, Learning, Michigan, Nonconformity, Policy development, Protective factors, Risk factors, School districts, Schools, Sex characteristics, Sex role, Sexual harassment, Students, Violence prevention, Work force

Healthy Youth Development Prevention Research Center. 2016. 2016 Minnesota adolescent sexual health report. Minneapolis, MN: University of Minnesota, Division of General Pediatrics and Adolescent Health, 5 pp.

Annotation: This report provides information about the sexual health of adolescents in Minnesota. Contents include adolescent pregnancy and birth statistics for the period 1990–2014, including information about trends in adolescent pregnancy and birth, national comparison, and subsequent births. Additional topics include geographic and racial/ethnic disparities in adolescent pregnancy, birth, and sexually transmitted infections; sexual orientation; and adverse childhood experiences.

Contact: University of Minnesota, Division of General Pediatrics and Adolescent Health, Department of Pediatrics, 717 Delaware Street, S.E., 3rd Floor, Minneapolis, MN 55414-2959, Telephone: (612) 626-2134 Fax: (612) 6264-0997 Web Site: https://www.pediatrics.umn.edu/divisions/general-pediatrics-and-adolescent-health Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent pregnancy, Adolescents, Childbirth, Ethnic factors, Geographic factors, Health disparities, Minnesota, Risk taking, Sexual health, Sexually transmitted diseases, Statistical data, Trends

National Center for HIV/AIDS, Viral Hepatitis, STD, and TB Prevention, Division of Adolescent and School Health. 2016. CDC Division of Adolescent and School Health DASH strategic plan for fiscal years 2015–2020. Atlanta, GA: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 44 pp.

Annotation: This document presents a strategic framework and 5-year plan for maximizing opportunities for primary prevention of HIV and other sexually transmitted infections and pregnancy among adolescents. Contents include the history of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Division of Adolescent and School Health (DASH); information about adolescent health and schools as a venue for health promotion and disease prevention among adolescents; and DASH's mission, approach, vision, goals, core business, strategic imperatives, objectives and indicators, strategies and activities, and strategic feedback loop. The appendices contain information about school-based surveillance systems, middle and high school sexual health education topic indicators, and DASH's research agenda.

Contact: National Center for HIV/AIDS, Viral Hepatits, STD, and TB Prevention, Division of Adolescent and School Health, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 4770 Buford Highway, N.E., Mailstop K-29, Atlanta, GA 30341-3724, Telephone: 800-232-4636 Secondary Telephone: (888) 232-6348 E-mail: cdcinfo@cdc.gov Web Site: http://www.cdc.gov/healthyyouth Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent health, Adolescent pregnancy prevention, Federal initiatives, HIV, Health promotion, Primary prevention, School health education, Schools, Sexual health, Sexually transmitted diseases, Strategic plans

National Center for HIV/AIDS, Viral Hepatitis, STD, and TB Prevention, Division of Adolescent and School Health. 2016. Developing a scope and sequence for sexual health education. Atlanta, GA: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 15 pp.

Annotation: This document describes how to determine the sexual health content and skills that should be taught at each grade level within a school health education curriculum framework to lower students' risk of HIV and other sexually transmitted infections, and unplanned pregnancy. Contents include guidance on using the Health Education Curriculum Analysis Tool (HECAT) to inform the breadth and arrangement of key health topics and concepts across grade levels (scope) and the logical progression of essential health knowledge, skills, and behaviors to be addressed at each grade level (sequence) from pre-kindergarten through the 12th grade. Additional contents include steps to create or revise a sexual health scope and sequence using the HECAT. A brief overview that explains what a scope and sequence is and what it is meant to accomplish is also available.

Contact: National Center for HIV/AIDS, Viral Hepatits, STD, and TB Prevention, Division of Adolescent and School Health, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 4770 Buford Highway, N.E., Mailstop K-29, Atlanta, GA 30341-3724, Telephone: 800-232-4636 Secondary Telephone: (888) 232-6348 E-mail: cdcinfo@cdc.gov Web Site: http://www.cdc.gov/healthyyouth Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent health, Adolescent pregnancy prevention, Curriculum development, HIV, Primary prevention, School districts, School health education, Schools, Sexual health, Sexually transmitted diseases

New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene. 2016. Sexual and reproductive health care best practices for adolescents and adults. New York, NY: New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene, 24 pp.

Annotation: This guide for health care professionals in multiple settings describes best practices for sexual and reproductive health, with a focus on contraceptive care and the prevention, screening, and testing of sexually transmitted infections (STI) and HIV. Contents include information about leading with a sexual and reproductive justice approach; policy and practice recommendations; and best practices specific to the primary care and prenatal, labor and delivery, and postpartum care settings. Additional contents include tools and resources on topics such as contraception care and provision, STI and HIV prevention and treatment, adolescent health care, patient-centered care and the sexual and reproductive justice framework, LGBTQ health care, intimate partner violence and reproductive coercion, health insurance access, and financial assistance and device reimbursement.

Contact: New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene, 2 Lafayette Street, 20th Floor, CN-65, New York, NY 10007, Telephone: (212) 676-2188 E-mail: http://www.nyc.gov/html/mail/html/maildoh.html Web Site: http://www1.nyc.gov/site/doh/index.page Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent health, Contraception, Contraceptive use, Culturally competent services, Family planning, Health promotion, Preventive health services, Primary care, Program improvement, Quality assurance, Reproductive health, Service integration, Sexual health, Sexually transmitted diseases

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This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number U02MC31613, MCH Advanced Education Policy, $3.5 M. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.