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Strengthening the evidence for maternal and child health programs

Search Results: MCHLine

Items in this list may be obtained from the sources cited. Contact information reflects the most current data about the source that has been provided to the MCH Digital Library.


Displaying records 1 through 20 (73 total).

Hagan JF Jr. 2019. Making Bright Futures work: How evidence, the periodicity schedule, and the Bright Futures guidelines impact practice. Itasca, IL: American Academy of Pediatrrics, 1 video (58 min.).

Annotation: This video reviews new clinical content in the Bright Futures Guidelines and the associated Periodicity Schedule, and discusses how to use evidence to decide on content for your practice's health supervision visits and how to identify strategies, tools, and resources to maximize efficiency for health promotion and preventive services.

Contact: American Academy of Pediatrics, 345 Park Boulevard, Itasca, IL 60143, Telephone: (630) 626-6000 Secondary Telephone: (847) 434-4000 Fax: (847) 434-8000 Web Site: https://www.aap.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent development, Adolescent health, Anticipatory guidance, Child development, Child health, Communities, Disease prevention, Emotional development, Evidence based medicine, Families, Guidelines, Health promotion, Health screening, Health supervision, Infant development, Infant health, Injury prevention, Mental health, Nutrition, Oral health, Pediatric care, Perinatal health, Physical activity, Preventive health services, Protective factors, Psychosocial development, Safety, Sexual health, Standards, Videos, Weight management

Amercan Academy of Pediatrics. 2018. Bright Futures tool and resource kit (2nd ed.). Itasca, IL: Amercan Academy of Pediatrics,

Annotation: This companion to the most current edition of the Bright Futures Guidelines for Health Supervision of Infants, Children and Adolescents, the national standard for well-child care provides updated forms and materials relate to preventive health supervision and health screening for infants, children, and adolescents. These include pre-visit questionnaires, visit documentation forms, parent and patient handouts, supplemental education handouts, and medical screening reference tables.

Contact: American Academy of Pediatrics, 345 Park Boulevard, Itasca, IL 60143, Telephone: (630) 626-6000 Secondary Telephone: (847) 434-4000 Fax: (847) 434-8000 Web Site: https://www.aap.org

Keywords: Adolescent development, Adolescent health, Anticipatory guidance, Child development, Child health, Communities, Disease prevention, Emotional development, Families, Guidelines, Health promotion, Health screening, Health supervision, Infant development, Infant health, Injury prevention, Mental health, Nutrition, Oral health, Pediatric care, Perinatal health, Physical activity, Preventive health services, Professional resources, Protective factors, Psychosocial development, Safety, Sexual health, Standards, Weight management

Hagan JF, Shaw JS, Duncan PM, eds. 2017. Bright Futures: Guidelines for health supervision of infants, children, and adolescents–Pocket guide (4th ed.). Elk Grove Village, IL: American Academy of Pediatrics, 123 pp.

Annotation: These guidelines provide background information and recommendations for promoting the healthy development of infants, children, and adolescents from birth to age 21, as well as standards for health supervision visits. Topics include lifelong health for families and communities, family support, health for children and adolescents with special health care needs, development, mental health, weight, nutrition, physical activity, oral health, use of social media, and safety and injury prevention. A pocket guide is also available. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: American Academy of Pediatrics, 345 Park Boulevard, Itasca, IL 60143, Telephone: (630) 626-6000 Secondary Telephone: (847) 434-4000 Fax: (847) 434-8000 Web Site: https://www.aap.org $16.95, plus shipping and handling. Document Number: ISBN 978-1-61002-082-4.

Keywords: Adolescent development, Adolescent health, Anticipatory guidance, Child development, Child health, Communities, Disease prevention, Emotional development, Families, Guidelines, Health promotion, Health screening, Health supervision, Infant development, Infant health, Injury prevention, Mental health, Nutrition, Oral health, Pediatric care, Perinatal health, Physical activity, Preventive health services, Protective factors, Psychosocial development, Safety, Sexual health, Standards, Weight management

Epstein R, Gonzalez T. 2017. Gender & trauma: Somatic interventions for girls in juvenile justice–Implications for policy and practice. Washington, DC: Georgetown Law Center on Poverty and Inequality, 37 pp.

Annotation: This report provides a foundational understanding of the relationship between trauma and gender -- with a focus on system-involved girls -- and provides an analysis of somatic interventions. In particular, the report maps the ways in which trauma-informed, gender-responsive, and culturally competent yoga and mindfulness programs can address the short- and long-term impact of trauma on girls in the juvenile justice system. Topics include the core components of somatic interventions for traumatized girls, data documenting positive effects, and specific policy and practice recommendations to increase access for system-involved girls.

Contact: Georgetown Law, Center on Poverty and Inequality, 600 New Jersey Avenue, S.W., Washington, DC 20001, Telephone: (202) 661-6692 E-mail: povertycenter@law.georgetown.edu Web Site: http://www.law.georgetown.edu/academics/centers-institutes/poverty-inequality/index.cfm Available from the website.

Keywords: Access to health care, Adolescent females, Culturally competent services, Ethnic factors, Intervention, Juvenile justice, Policy development, Sexuality, Therapeutics, Trauma care

Michigan State Board of Education. 2016. State Board of Education statement and guidance on safe and supportive learning environments for lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and questioning (LGBTQ) students. Lansing, MI: Michigan Department of Education, 9 pp.

Annotation: These voluntary guidelines are intended to support schools in creating an inclusive environment for all students in Michigan. Contents include best practice strategies for school districts to create a supportive learning environment with specific guidance on supporting transgender and gender nonconforming students. Definitions are included.

Contact: Michigan State Board of Education, 608 W. Allegan Street, Lansing, MI 48909, Telephone: (517) 373-3324 Web Site: http://www.michigan.gov/mde/0,4615,7-140-5373---,00.html Available from the website.

Keywords: Bullying, Child health, Child safety, Civil rights, Health promotion, Homosexuality, Injury prevention, Learning, Michigan, Nonconformity, Policy development, Protective factors, Risk factors, School districts, Schools, Sex characteristics, Sex role, Sexual harassment, Students, Violence prevention, Work force

National Center for HIV/AIDS, Viral Hepatitis, STD, and TB Prevention, Division of Adolescent and School Health. 2016. Developing a scope and sequence for sexual health education. Atlanta, GA: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 15 pp.

Annotation: This document describes how to determine the sexual health content and skills that should be taught at each grade level within a school health education curriculum framework to lower students' risk of HIV and other sexually transmitted infections, and unplanned pregnancy. Contents include guidance on using the Health Education Curriculum Analysis Tool (HECAT) to inform the breadth and arrangement of key health topics and concepts across grade levels (scope) and the logical progression of essential health knowledge, skills, and behaviors to be addressed at each grade level (sequence) from pre-kindergarten through the 12th grade. Additional contents include steps to create or revise a sexual health scope and sequence using the HECAT. A brief overview that explains what a scope and sequence is and what it is meant to accomplish is also available.

Contact: National Center for HIV/AIDS, Viral Hepatits, STD, and TB Prevention, Division of Adolescent and School Health, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 4770 Buford Highway, N.E., Mailstop K-29, Atlanta, GA 30341-3724, Telephone: 800-232-4636 Secondary Telephone: (888) 232-6348 E-mail: cdcinfo@cdc.gov Web Site: http://www.cdc.gov/healthyyouth Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent health, Adolescent pregnancy prevention, Curriculum development, HIV, Primary prevention, School districts, School health education, Schools, Sexual health, Sexually transmitted diseases

Littrell J. 2015. Human trafficking in America's schools. Washington, DC: U.S. Department of Education, 13 pp.

Annotation: This guide is designed to assist school officials in understanding how human trafficking impacts schools; recognizing the indicators of possible child trafficking; and developing policies, protocols, and partnerships to address and prevent the exploitation of children. Topics include child sex trafficking, child labor trafficking, deconstructing perceptions and a victim-centered approach, risk factors and predictors, what to do about suspected trafficking, recruitment, impact on learning environment, and community involvement. The guide contains a sample protocol for school districts and describes U.S. government entities combating human trafficking, publications and resources, training, services, and terms and definitions.

Contact: National Center on Safe Supportive Learning Environments, American Institutes for Research, 1000 Thomas Jefferson Street, N.W., Washington, DC 20007, Telephone: (202) 403-5000 Fax: (202) 403-5001 Web Site: http://safesupportivelearning.ed.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Child labor, Child sexual abuse, Community action, Learning, Policy development, Protective factors, Protocols, Public private partnerships, Resources for professionals, Risk factors, School age children, Schools, Training

White House Task Force to Protect Students from Sexual Assault. 2014. Not alone: The first report of the White House Task Force to Protect Students from Sexual Assault. [Washington, DC]: White House Task Force to Protect Students from Sexual Assault, 20 pp.

Annotation: This report presents action steps and recommendations from a federal task force to protect students from sexual violence. Topics include using campus climate surveys to identify problems; preventing sexual assault on campus; responding effectively when a student is sexually assaulted; and improving the federal government's enforcement efforts, and making them more transparent.

Keywords: Community action, Crime prevention, Federal initiatives, Injury prevention, Interpersonal violence, Judicial actions, Policy development, Program improvement, Public private partnerships, Schools, Sexual assault, Students, Surveys, Training, Trauma, Violence prevention

National Child Traumatic Stress Network. 2014. LGBTQ youth and sexual abuse: Information for mental health professionals. Los Angeles, CA, and Durham, NC: National Child Traumatic Stress Network, 7 pp.

Farrukh A, Sadwick R, Villasenor J. 2014. Youth internet safety: Risks, responses, and research recommendations. Washington, DC: Center for Technology Innovation at Brookings, 18 pp.

Annotation: This paper provides an overview of research representative of the depth and breadth of publications addressing child and youth online safety. Contents include an analysis of key findings, knowledge gaps, and policy recommendations. Topics include cyberbullying, sexual solicitation and unwanted exposure to sexual content, the role of privacy, parent and community involvement, and intergenerational gaps in attitudes toward internet safety issues.

Contact: Brookings Institution, 1775 Massachusetts Avenue, N.W., Washington, DC 20036, Telephone: (202) 797-6000 Fax: (202) 797-6004 E-mail: communications@brookings.edu Web Site: http://www.brookings.edu Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescents, Bullying, Children, Communication, Confidentiality, Internet, Interpersonal relations, Measures, Online systems, Policy development, Protective factors, Psychosocial development, Research, Risk factors, Safety, Sexual harassment, Trust

Laudenbach JM, Frediani R. 2014. Human papillomavirus vaccination for the prevention of oropharyngeal cancer in the United States: A cost-benefit analysis. Pomona, CA: Center for Oral Health, 7 pp.

Annotation: This brief describes the potential relationship between the benefits of human papillomavirus (HPV) immunization and the costs of oropharyngeal cancer in the United States. Contents include information about oral HPV infection and HPV vaccination; an economic cost-benefit analysis; and conclusions.

Contact: Center for Oral Health, 309 East Second Street, Pomona, CA 91766-1854, Telephone: (909) 469-8300 Fax: (510) 380-6637 E-mail: info@tc4oh.org Web Site: http://www.centerfororalhealth.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Cost effectiveness, Economics, Human papillomavirus, Immunization, Oral health, Policy development, Sexually transmitted diseases, Vaccination effects, Vaccines

Teaching Tolerance. 2013. Bullied: A student, a school and a case that made history. [Montgomery, AL]: Teaching Tolerance, 5 pp.

Annotation: This website describes a documentary film geared toward middle school and high school students, administrators, teachers, and counselors that chronicles one student's ordeal at the hands of anti-gay bullies and offers a message of hope for those fighting harassment. The film is intended to help create a safer school environment for all students, help students understand the toll bullying takes on victims, and encourage students to stand up for classmates who are being harassed. The film, which is 40 minutes in length, includes closed captioning and Spanish subtitles. Also included is a viewer's guide with lesson plans and activities that can be used in staff development. Additional related resources are available on the website.

Contact: Teaching Tolerance, c/o Southern Poverty Law Center , 400 Washington Avenue, Montgomery, AL 36104, Telephone: (334) 956-8200 Fax: (334) 956-8488 E-mail: http://www.tolerance.org/contact-us Web Site: http://www.tolerance.org/ Available from the website.

Keywords: Bullying, Consumer education materials, High schools, Homosexuality, Middle schools, Safety, Sexual harassment, Spanish language materials, Staff development, Tolerance

Weitlauf A, White S, Yancey O, Rissler CN, Harland E, Van Tran C, Bowers J, Newsom C. 2013. The Healthy Bodies toolkit. Nashville, TN: Vanderbilt Kennedy Center for Excellence in Developmental Disabilities, 2 items.

Annotation: This toolkit provides two booklets to help parents talk to their children with intellectual or developmental disabilities about topics related to puberty, one addressing girls and one addressing boys. Topics include encouraging good hygiene and appropriate behavior and how to deal with physiological manifestations of puberty. The publications may be individualized to include an organization's name and its most frequent referrals. Appendices with social stories and visual supports are also available. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: Vanderbilt Kennedy Center for Excellence in Developmental Disabilities, PMB 40, 230 Appleton Place, Nashville, TN 37203-5721, Telephone: (615) 322-8240 E-mail: kc@vanderbilt.edu Web Site: http://www.kc.vanderbilt.edu Available from the website.

Keywords: , Adolescent health, Adolescents with special health care needs, Child health, Developmental disabilities, Psychosexual development, Puberty, Sex characteristics, Sexual development

Child Welfare Information Gateway. 2013. Supporting your LGBTQ youth: A guide for foster parents. Washington, DC: Child Welfare Information Gateway, 11 pp. (Factsheet for families)

Annotation: This fact sheet for families provides information about how foster parents can support lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and questioning (LGBTQ) youth. The fact sheet provides background information about LGBTQ youth and discusses LGBTQ youth and the child welfare system, creating a welcoming home for youth, and supporting youth in the community.

Contact: Child Welfare Information Gateway, Administration on Children, Youth, and Families, Children's Bureau, 1250 Maryland Avenue, S.W., Eighth Floor, Washington, DC 20024, Telephone: (800) 394-3366 Secondary Telephone: E-mail: info@childwelfare.gov Web Site: http://www.childwelfare.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Access to health care, Adolescent sexuality, Adolescents, Bullying, Child welfare agencies, Community programs, Foster children, Foster parents, Homosexuality, Parent support services, Prevention, Schools, Social services, Youth, Youth development

Wildsmith E, Barry M, Manlov J, Vaughn B. 2013. Dating and sexual relationships. [Bethesda, MD]: Child Trends, 10 pp. (Adolescent health highlight)

Annotation: This report presents key research findings about the prevalence of and trends in adolescents' dating and sexual relationships. Additional topics include dating and sexual behaviors that may put adolescents at risk for negative outcomes; how these behaviors vary by gender, age, and race/ethnicity; and individual, family, and media influences on adolescents' sexual behaviors.

Contact: Child Trends, 7315 Wisconsin Avenue, Suite 1200 W, Bethesda, MD 20814, Telephone: (240) 223-9200 E-mail: Web Site: http://www.childtrends.org Available from the website. Document Number: Pub. no. 2013-04.

Keywords: Adolescents, Environmental influences, Relationships, Risk factors, Sexual behavior, Sexual development, Sexual health, Sexual partners

Sorace D. 2013. Addressing sexual health in schools: Policy considerations. Washington, DC: Advocates for Youth, 25 pp.

Annotation: This report provides research and best practices on policies that address adolescent sexual health in schools. It discusses the rationale for sexual health education and access to sexual and reproductive health services; explains why policy is important and describes policy parameters and the local policy process; and presents an overview of policy considerations related to sexual and reproductive health education and services. The report is intended to help guide educators, administrators, and advocates to assess the sexual health policies and practices in their states, school districts, and schools.

Contact: Advocates for Youth, 2000 M Street, N.W., Suite 750, Washington, DC 20036, Telephone: (202) 419-3420 Fax: (202) 419-1448 Web Site: http://www.advocatesforyouth.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Policy development, Reproductive health, School health, School health education, School linked programs, School services, Sexuality education

Healthy Teen Network. [2012]. The unique sexual and reproductive health needs of gay, lesbian, bisexual, transgender, and questioning (LGBTQ) youth. Baltimore, MD: Healthy Teen Network, 2 pp. (Fast facts)

Annotation: This fact sheet provides data on American adolescents (ages 13 to 18) from 1990 to 2002 who identify as lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, or questioning (LGBTQ). It includes statistics on the percentage of adolescents who identify as LGBTQ; describes the sexual and risk-taking behavior of this population; discusses the increased risk of sexuality transmitted infection (STIs), HIV, and pregnancy; points to the absence of sex education courses and materials that address sexual orientation; describes the difficulties that LGBTQ adolescents face in obtaining information, services, and support; and provides tips to help individuals, educators, and organizations successfully include LGBTQ youth. A resource list provides links to related websites.

Contact: Healthy Teen Network, 1501 Saint Paul Street, Suite 124, Baltimore, MD 21202, Telephone: (410) 685-0410 Fax: (410) 687-0481 E-mail: info@healthyteennetwork.org Web Site: http://www.healthyteennetwork.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent sexuality, Homosexuality, Psychosocial development, Sexuality education, Statistics, Youth

Huberman BK. 2012. Let's Talk Month planning guidebook. (Rev. ed.). Washington, D.C.: Advocates for Youth, 132 pp.

Annotation: This Let's Talk Month planning guidebook focuses on the importance of communication between adults and young people to help young people develop responsible behavior about sexuality. It includes information on planning and implementing Let's Talk Month; involving youth and youth-adult partnerships to promote parent-child communication; and working with media. It also includes sample forms and materials, work sheets and handouts for facilitators, and other resources.

Contact: Advocates for Youth, 2000 M Street, N.W., Suite 750, Washington, DC 20036, Telephone: (202) 419-3420 Fax: (202) 419-1448 Web Site: http://www.advocatesforyouth.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent attitudes, Adolescent sexuality, Communication skills, Guidelines, Parent education programs, Sexuality education, Youth development

National Sexuality Education Standards: Core Content and Skills, K-12 Advisory Committee and Future of Sex Education Initiative. 2012. National sexuality education standards: Core content and skills, K-12. Bethesda, MD: American School Health Association, 42 pp. (Special report; A special publication of the Journal of School Health)

Annotation: These national education standards are intended to provide clear and consistent guidance on the essential minimum core content for sexuality education that is developmentally and age-appropriate for students in grades K-12. Developed as a result of the Future of Sex Education initiative that brought together health educators, advocates, policy makers, and other key players to create a strategic plan for sexuality education policy and implementation, the standards outline essential content and skills for sexuality education K-12 given student needs and available time and resources. The goals, guiding values, and principles behind the standards are also discussed. The standards are presented according to grade level and topic area, and additional resources are provided for teachers, school administrators, parents, and middle and high school students.

Contact: American School Health Association, 7918 Jones Branch Drive, Suite 300, McLean, VA 22102, Telephone: (703) 506-7675 Fax: (703) 506-3266 E-mail: info@ashaweb.org Web Site: http://www.ashaweb.org

Keywords: Curriculum development, Guidelines, Manuals, School health education, Sexuality education, Standards

Sachs N, McGarity TO, Steinzor R, Simpson A, Shudtz M. 2012. Protecting the public from BPA: An action plan for federal agencies. Washington, DC: Center for Progressive Reform, 33 pp. (White paper #1202)

Annotation: This white paper, which is intended to assist federal agencies in moving forward with Bisphenol-A(BPA) regulation and to provide the public with a more informative and safer consumer environment, outlines various short- and long-term regulatory options for protecting the public from health risks that BPA poses. The paper describes a two-prong approach, with the first phase focusing on immediate information collection and dissemination and the second including regulatory controls, standards, and protections to be promulgated as soon as missing information becomes available. The paper also discusses the current state of BPA, including known risks and regulatory safeguards; existing international, state, and local BPA controls, and regulatory efforts at the federal level.

Contact: Center for Progressive Reform, 455 Massachusetts Avenue, N.W., #150-513, Washington, DC 20001, Telephone: (202) 747-0698 E-mail: info@progressivereform.org Web Site: http://www.progressivereform.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Cancer, Cardiovascular disease, Chemicals, Child health, Cognitive development, Diabetes, Endocrine diseases, Environmental exposure, Health, Infant health, Prevention, Public health, Reproductive health, Sexuality

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This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number U02MC31613, MCH Advanced Education Policy, $3.5 M. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.