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Strengthening the evidence for maternal and child health programs

Search Results: MCHLine

Items in this list may be obtained from the sources cited. Contact information reflects the most current data about the source that has been provided to the MCH Digital Library.


Displaying records 1 through 20 (163 total).

Healthy Teen Network and ETR Associates. n.d.. Weaving science & practice: Frequently asked questions about science-based approaches. Baltimore, MD: Healthy Teen Network, 20 pp.

Annotation: This document describes seven science-based approaches in adolescent pregnancy, HIV, and sexually transmitted infection prevention. Topics include assessment, health education and behavior change theory, logic models, science-based programs, adaptation and fidelity, characteristics of promising programs, and process and outcome evaluation. Additional topics include the benefits of using science-based approaches, ten steps for getting to outcomes, and training and technical assistance.

Contact: Healthy Teen Network, 1501 Saint Paul Street, Suite 124, Baltimore, MD 21202, Telephone: (410) 685-0410 Fax: (410) 687-0481 E-mail: info@healthyteennetwork.org Web Site: http://www.healthyteennetwork.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent pregnancy prevention, Assessment, Behavior modification, HIV, Health behavior, Health education, Methods, Models, Outcome evaluation, Prevention programs, Process evaluation, Sexually transmitted diseases

Kann L, Olsen EO, McManus T, Harris WA, Shanklin SL, Flint KH, Queen B, Lowry R, Chyen D, Whittle L, Thornton J, Lim C, Yamakawa Y, Brenner N, Zaza S. 2016. Sexual identify, sex of sexual contacts, and health-related behaviors among students in grades 9–12: United States and selected sites, 2015. MMWR Surveillance Summaries 65(9):1–202,

Annotation: This report summarizes results for 118 health-related behaviors plus obesity, overweight, and asthma by sexual identity and sex of sexual contacts from the 2015 national Youth Risk Behavior Survey, 25 state surveys, and 19 large urban school district surveys conducted among students in grades 9–12. Contents include a description of the Youth Risk Behavior Surveillance System, survey methodology, and survey results for the prevalence of health-risk behaviors among sexual minority students compared with nonsexual minority students. Recommendations for reducing disparities in health-risk behaviors among sexual minority students are also included.

Contact: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 1600 Clifton Road, Atlanta, GA 30329-4027, Telephone: (800) 232-4636 Secondary Telephone: (888) 232-6348 E-mail: cdcinfo@cdc.gov Web Site: http://www.cdc.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent health, Adolescent sexuality, Adolescents, Comparative analysis, Health behavior, Health surveys, Individual characteristics, Minority groups, National surveys, Population surveillance, Prevalence, Risk factors, Risk taking, School districts, School surveys, Sex factors, Sexual behavior, Sexual health, Sexual identity, Sexual partners, State surveys, Statistical data, Urban population

National Campaign to Prevent Teen Pregnancy. 2015, 2013. Tips to help faith leaders and their communities address teen pregnancy. Washington, DC: National Campaign to Prevent Teen Pregnancy, 20 pp.

Annotation: This publication is designed to help religious and secular leaders engage adolescents in conversations about sex and adolescent pregnancy within the context of their religious beliefs. Contents include nine tips to help faith leaders and their communities address adolescent pregnancy. The publication is available in English and Spanish.

Contact: National Campaign to Prevent Teen and Unplanned Pregnancy = Power to Decide, 1776 Massachusetts Avenue, N.W., Suite 200, Washington, DC 20036, Telephone: (202) 478-8500 Fax: (202) 478-8588 E-mail: campaign@teenpregnancy.org Web Site: http://www.thenationalcampaign.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent pregnancy, Communication, Prevention, Religious beliefs, Sexual behavior, Spanish language materials, Spirituality

U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Office of Adolescent Health and Family and Youth Services Bureau. 2014-. Teen pregnancy prevention evidence review. Washington, DC: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, 1 v.

Annotation: This website provides information and resources from an ongoing independent systematic review of the adolescent pregnancy prevention research to identify programs with evidence of effectiveness in reducing adolescent pregnancy, sexually transmitted infections, and associated sexual risk behaviors. The website includes information on study quality and program models that have demonstrated positive impacts on sexual risk behavior and sexual health outcomes. Contents include a searchable database of studies included in the review, information about the review process and how the review is conducted, publications written by the review team, answers to frequently asked questions, and contact information for the study team.

Contact: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Office of the Assistant Secretary for Planning and Evaluation, Hubert H. Humphrey Building, 200 Independence Avenue, S.W., Room 415 F, Washington, DC 20201, Web Site: http://aspe.hhs.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent health, Adolescent pregnancy, Adolescents, Health behavior, Literature reviews, Prevention programs, Program models, Research methodology, Risk factors, Sexual health, Sexually transmitted diseases

Henry J. Kaiser Family Foundation. 2014. Sexual health of adolescents and young adults in the United States. Menlo Park, CA: Henry J. Kaiser Family Foundation, 7 pp. (Fact sheet)

Annotation: This fact sheet provides data on sexual activity, contraceptive use, pregnancy, prevalence of sexually transmitted infections, and access to reproductive health services among adolescents and young adults in the United States.

Contact: Henry J. Kaiser Family Foundation, 2400 Sand Hill Road, Menlo Park, CA 94025, Telephone: (650) 854-9400 Secondary Telephone: (202) 347-5270 Fax: (650) 854-4800 Web Site: http://www.kff.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescents, Data, Sexual behavior, Sexual health, Statistics, Trends, Young adults

Kearney MS, Levine PB. 2014. Media influences on social outcomes: The impact of MTV's 16 and pregnant on teen childbearing. Cambridge, MA: National Bureau of Economic Research, 43 pp. (NBER working paper series no. 19795)

Annotation: This paper explores the impact of a reality television series, MTV's 16 and Pregnant, on adolescent attitudes and outcomes. Contents include background information on the show's content and previous research on the impact of media exposure; a description of the data including Nielson ratings, Google trends, and Twitter activity; a descriptive analysis of adolescents' exposure to the show; and analyses of high frequency data on searches and tweets and data on adolescent births. Topics include changes in searches and tweets, geographic variation in viewership, and changes in adolescent birth rates.

Contact: National Bureau of Economic Research, 1050 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, MA 02138-5398, Telephone: (617) 868-3900 Fax: (617) 868-2742 E-mail: info@nber.org Web Site: http://www.nber.org $5.

Keywords: , Abortion, Adolescent attitudes, Attitude change, Behavior modification, Contraception, Economic factors, Health behavior, Interactive media, Media, Outcome evaluation, Sexual behavior

Mississippi First, Sexuality Information and Education Council of the United States, Women's Foundation of Mississippi. 2014. Sexuality education in Mississippi: Progress in the magnolia state. New York, NY: Sexuality Information and Education Council of the United States, 38 pp.

Institute of Medicine and National Research Council. 2014. Confronting commercial sexual exploitation and sex trafficking of minors in the United States: A guide for the health care sector. Washington, DC: Institute of Medicine , 37 pp.

Annotation: This guide for health professionals presents findings from a comprehensive review of commercial sexual exploitation and sex trafficking of minors in the United States. Topics include the definition of the issue, guiding principles, the extent of the problem, risk factors, and consequences. Additional topics include barriers to identification of victims and survivors, how health professionals can help, and recommended strategies.

Contact: National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine, Health and Medicine Division, 500 Fifth Street, N.W., Washington, DC 20001, Telephone: (202) 334-2352 Fax: (202) 334-1412 E-mail: HMD-NASEM@nas.edu Web Site: https://www.nationalacademies.org/hmd Available from the website.

Keywords: Barriers, Children, Resources for professionals, Risk taking, Sexual behavior

U.S. Preventive Services Task Force. 2014. Sexually transmitted infections: Behavioral counseling. Rockville, MD: U.S. Preventive Services Task Force, multiple items.

Colman S, Dee TS, Joyce TJ. 2013. Do parental involvement laws deter risky teen sex?. Cambridge, MA: National Bureau of Economic Research, 43 pp. (NBER working paper series no. 18810)

Annotation: This paper addresses the question of whether laws requiring that physicians notify or obtain consent from a parent of a minor seeking an abortion before performing the procedure deter risky adolescent sexual behavior. Drawing on multiple data sources, the paper seeks to reconcile the disparate findings in the existing literature and to provide new and comprehensive evidence on the association between parental involvement (PI) laws and rates of sexually transmitted infections (STIs) in adolescents. Topics include abortion access and risky sexual activity among adolescents, data and samples, methods, and estimated impacts of PI laws on STIs.

Contact: National Bureau of Economic Research, 1050 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, MA 02138-5398, Telephone: (617) 868-3900 Fax: (617) 868-2742 E-mail: info@nber.org Web Site: http://www.nber.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Abortion, Access to health care, Adolescent behavior, Adolescent sexuality, Consent, Health services, Parents, Legislation, Prevention, Risk taking, Sexually transmitted diseases, Statistical data

Zweig J, Dank M. 2013. Teen dating abuse and harassment in the digital world: Implications for prevention and intervention. Washington, DC: Urban Institute, 2 pp.

Annotation: This report focuses on dating adolescents and abuse and harassment via digital media (i.e., online or via text messaging). The report provides background and discusses where and how abuse occurs; and what educators, parents, advocates, and adolescents should know. The link between abuse via digital means and other types of abuse is discussed, as well as strategies for prevention and intervention.

Contact: Urban Institute, 2100 M Street, N.W., Washington, DC 20037, Telephone: (202) 833-7200 Fax: (202) 467-5775 E-mail: http://www.urban.org/about/contact.cfm Web Site: http://www.urban.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Abuse, Adolescent behavior, Adolescents, Child abuse, Child sexual abuse, Dating, Intervention, Physical abuse, Prevention, Relationships, Sexual abuse, Sexual harassment

Anderson R, Panchaud C, Singh S, Watson K. 2013. Demystifying data: A guide to using evidence to improve young people's sexual health and rights. New York, NY: Guttmacher Institute; London, United Kingdom: International Planned Parenthood Federation, 75 pp., plus appendices.

Annotation: This guide aims to help health professionals, advocates, and educators in the field of sexual and reproductive health and rights better understand and use evidence on adolescents' knowledge and behaviors. The guide provides demographic and socioeconomic information about adolescents as well as measures of their access to, need for, and use of sexual and reproductive health information and services. Presenting data for 30 countries, the guide explains the meaning of the data and how to use it to help those working with young people bring about change. The guide is available in English, French, and Spanish.

Contact: Guttmacher Institute, 125 Maiden Lane, New York, NY 10038, Telephone: (212) 248-1111 Secondary Telephone: (800) 355-0244 Fax: (212) 248-1951; Washington, D.C. Office (202) 223-5756 E-mail: guttmacher@guttmacher.org Web Site: http://www.guttmacher.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Access to health care, Adolescent behavior, Adolescent health, Adolescent sexuality, Health services, International health, Non English language materials, Reproductive health, Spanish language materials, Statistical data

Dworsky A, Napolitano L, Barisik E, Reddy S, Simon M. 2013. The Demoiselle-2-Femme (D2F) pregnancy prevention program evaluation: Findings from the first baseline survey. Chicago, IL: Chapin Hall at the University of Chicago, 32 pp.

Annotation: This report presents the results of a baseline survey completed by 241 girls, primarily African American, in grade 9 through 11 who are participating in a federally funded evaluation of the Demoiselle-2-Femme signature after-school program in Chicago, Illinois. The purpose of the evaluation is to estimate the effects of program participation on a number of key behavioral outcomes, including sexual activity, unprotected sex, and adolescent pregnancy. The report presents background; describes the program; and discusses study design and methods; student characteristics; relationships with adults; attitudes, feelings, and knowledge about sexual behavior; sexual behavior and prior pregnancy; dating violence; tobacco, alcohol, and marijuana use; and educational expectations.

Contact: Chapin Hall at the University of Chicago, 1313 East 60th Street, Chicago, IL 60637, Telephone: (773) 753-5900 Fax: (773) 753-5940 Web Site: http://www.chapinhall.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent attitudes, Adolescent behavior, Adolescent females, Adolescent pregnancy, Adolescent sexuality, Alcohol consumption behavior, Blacks, Community programs, Dating, Educational attainment, Illinois, Interpersonal violence, Marijuana, Prevention, Relationships, Smoking, Substance abuse

U.S. Office of Minority Health. 2013. The Circle of Life multimedia program. [Rockville. MD]: U.S. Office of Minority Health,

Annotation: This website presents the Circle of Life multimedia program, a curriculum intended for American Indian/Alaska Native middle school students that is based on the medicine wheel, a teaching symbol about mental, physical, spiritual, and emotional wellness. This holistic health promotion model is meant to help students learn about making healthy choices to prevent disease such as HIV/AIDS. The curriculum is divided into seven chapter sessions that are 20-25 minutes each and is presented in a modular form that can be broken up or used in sequence either in or outside the classroom. Teacher notes and an accessible version of the curriculum are also available on the website.

Contact: U.S. Office of Minority Health, The Tower Building, 1101 Wootton Parkway, Suite 600, Rockville, MD 20852, Telephone: (240) 453-2882 Secondary Telephone: (240) 453-2883 Fax: (240) 453-2883 E-mail: info@minorityhealth.hhs.gov Web Site: http://www.minorityhealth.hhs.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: AIDS, Adolescent attitudes, Adolescent behavior, Adolescent health, Adolescent sexuality, Alaska natives, American Indians, Child health, Curricula, Educational materials, HIV, Middle school students, Prevention, Sexually transmitted diseases

Child Trends Data Bank. 2013. "Statutory rape:" Sex between young teens and older individuals-Indicators on children and youth. Bethesda, MD: Child Trends, 14 pp.

Annotation: This report focuses on instances in which children and adolescents under age 15 engage in sexual relationships with someone at least 3 years older (statutory rape). Topics include importance; trends; differences by race and by Hispanic origin; by parental education; and by age at first sex; state, local, and international estimates; national goals; and related indicators. Statistical data are presented throughout the report. A definition of statutory rape is provided.

Contact: Child Trends, 7315 Wisconsin Avenue, Suite 1200 W, Bethesda, MD 20814, Telephone: (240) 223-9200 E-mail: Web Site: http://www.childtrends.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent behavior, Adolescent sexuality, Age factors, Educational factors, High risk adolescents, Racial factors, Rape, Risk factors, Sexual behavior, Sexual intercourse, Statistical data, Trends

Wildsmith E, Barry M, Manlov J, Vaughn B. 2013. Dating and sexual relationships. [Bethesda, MD]: Child Trends, 10 pp. (Adolescent health highlight)

Annotation: This report presents key research findings about the prevalence of and trends in adolescents' dating and sexual relationships. Additional topics include dating and sexual behaviors that may put adolescents at risk for negative outcomes; how these behaviors vary by gender, age, and race/ethnicity; and individual, family, and media influences on adolescents' sexual behaviors.

Contact: Child Trends, 7315 Wisconsin Avenue, Suite 1200 W, Bethesda, MD 20814, Telephone: (240) 223-9200 E-mail: Web Site: http://www.childtrends.org Available from the website. Document Number: Pub. no. 2013-04.

Keywords: Adolescents, Environmental influences, Relationships, Risk factors, Sexual behavior, Sexual development, Sexual health, Sexual partners

Guzman L, Caal S, Hickman S, Golub E, Ramos M. 2013. When sex and dating are the same: Latinos' attitudes on teen parenthood and contraception. Bethesda, MD: Child Trends, 7 pp. (Research brief)

Annotation: This research brief reports on what Child Trends learned through focus groups and interviews with Latino teens and parents about their values, ideals, and attitudes about teen parenthood, teen dating and sex, and the use of birth control by teens. It discusses the potential implications of these values, ideals, and attitudes for teen pregnancy prevention programs.

Contact: Child Trends, 7315 Wisconsin Avenue, Suite 1200 W, Bethesda, MD 20814, Telephone: (240) 223-9200 E-mail: Web Site: http://www.childtrends.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent pregnancy, Adolescent sexuality, Adolescents, Behavior, Hispanic Americans, Interviews, Prevention, Research

Alan Guttmacher Institute. 2012. Contraceptive services. New York, NY: Alan Guttmacher Institute, 4 pp. (In brief)

Annotation: This fact sheet summarizes statistics on the reproductive health and contraceptive service utilization of U.S. women. Trends in public funding of reproductive health services, particularly Title X-funded programs, as well as a cost-benefit discussion of publicly funded family planning programs are included. Demographic characteristics such as race and marital status are included along with frequency data on sexual activity, contraceptive methods, and pregnancy. A discussion of where women obtain contraceptive services is also included.

Contact: Guttmacher Institute, 125 Maiden Lane, New York, NY 10038, Telephone: (212) 248-1111 Secondary Telephone: (800) 355-0244 Contact Phone: (800) 825-0061 Fax: (212) 248-1951; Washington, D.C. Office (202) 223-5756 E-mail: guttmacher@guttmacher.org Web Site: http://www.guttmacher.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Access to care, Contraception, Family planning, Government financing, Health care financing, Public Health Service Act, Sexual behavior, Statistics, Title X, Trends, Unplanned pregnancy

Kearney MS, Levine PB. 2012. Explaining recent trends in the U.S. teen bith rate. Cambridge, MA: National Bureau of Economic Research, 31 pp. (NBER working paper series no. 17964)

Annotation: This paper investigates possible explanations for the large decline in U.S. adolescent childbearing that occurred in the 20 years following the 1991 peak. The authors review previous evidence and the results of new analyses to arrive at a set of observations that are presented in the paper. The methodology and findings are presented.

Contact: National Bureau of Economic Research, 1050 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, MA 02138-5398, Telephone: (617) 868-3900 Fax: (617) 868-2742 E-mail: info@nber.org Web Site: http://www.nber.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Racial factors, Adolescent behavior, Adolescent parents, Adolescent pregnancy, Adolescent sexuality, Contraception, Ethnic factors, Family planning programs, Medicaid, Public policy, Research, Sexuality education, Statistical data, Trends

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. 2012. Teen pregnancy and social media: The health communicator's social media toolkit. Atlanta, GA: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention,

Annotation: This website presents a social media tool to help promote adolescent pregnancy prevention efforts. The quick reference guide, which is intended as a companion piece to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's (CDC's) Social Media Toolkit for Health Communicators, highlights a number of social media tools with adolescent-pregnancy-prevention messages from CDC. The website provide badges and buttons that can be placed on websites; contact-syndication information; e-cards; text that can be pasted onto a Facebook page posted on Twitter; links to podcasts, public service announcements, and mobile web pages; and widgets.

Contact: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 1600 Clifton Road, Atlanta, GA 30329-4027, Telephone: (800) 232-4636 Secondary Telephone: (888) 232-6348 E-mail: cdcinfo@cdc.gov Web Site: http://www.cdc.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Social media, Adolescent attitudes, Adolescent behavior, Adolescent pregnancy, Adolescent sexuality, Health promotion, Prevention

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This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number U02MC31613, MCH Advanced Education Policy, $3.5 M. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.