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Strengthening the evidence for maternal and child health programs

Search Results: MCHLine

Items in this list may be obtained from the sources cited. Contact information reflects the most current data about the source that has been provided to the MCH Digital Library.


Displaying records 1 through 15 (15 total).

Keith J. n.d.. Family-Focused Strategy for Reducing Premature and Unprotected Sexual Activity Among Minority Youth in School-Based Health Clinics [Final report]. Dallas, TX: Dallas County Hospital District, 26 pp.

Annotation: The purpose of this project was to develop and demonstrate effective intervention strategies for the 10–15 year age group that can be carried out within a school-based comprehensive health care system to reduce the occurrence of premature and unprotected sexual intercourse in adolescents. More than 300 10-year-old children and their parents enrolled to receive annual health maintenance evaluations and a series of activities to enhance parent-child communication, parental knowledge of adolescent social and sexual development, and problem-solving and decision-making skills. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Technical Information Service, U.S. Department of Commerce, 5301 Shawnee Road, Alexandria, VA 22312, Telephone: (703) 605-6050 Secondary Telephone: (888) 584-8332 E-mail: customerservice@ntis.gov Web Site: http://www.ntis.gov Document Number: NTIS PB99-133977.

Keywords: Adolescents, Blacks, Decision Making Skills, Healthy Tomorrows Partnership for Children, Hispanics, Minority Groups, Parent Child Interaction, Parent Child Relationship, Preventive Health Care Education, School Dropouts, School Health Programs, School Health Services, Sexual Activity, Sexually Transmitted Diseases

Hagan JF Jr. 2019. Making Bright Futures work: How evidence, the periodicity schedule, and the Bright Futures guidelines impact practice. Itasca, IL: American Academy of Pediatrrics, 1 video (58 min.).

Annotation: This video reviews new clinical content in the Bright Futures Guidelines and the associated Periodicity Schedule, and discusses how to use evidence to decide on content for your practice's health supervision visits and how to identify strategies, tools, and resources to maximize efficiency for health promotion and preventive services.

Contact: American Academy of Pediatrics, 345 Park Boulevard, Itasca, IL 60143, Telephone: (630) 626-6000 Secondary Telephone: (847) 434-4000 Fax: (847) 434-8000 Web Site: https://www.aap.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent development, Adolescent health, Anticipatory guidance, Child development, Child health, Communities, Disease prevention, Emotional development, Evidence based medicine, Families, Guidelines, Health promotion, Health screening, Health supervision, Infant development, Infant health, Injury prevention, Mental health, Nutrition, Oral health, Pediatric care, Perinatal health, Physical activity, Preventive health services, Protective factors, Psychosocial development, Safety, Sexual health, Standards, Videos, Weight management

American Academy of Pediatrics. 2018. Bright Futures tool and resource kit (2nd ed.). Itasca, IL: Amercan Academy of Pediatrics,

Annotation: This companion to the most current edition of the Bright Futures Guidelines for Health Supervision of Infants, Children and Adolescents, the national standard for well-child care provides updated forms and materials relate to preventive health supervision and health screening for infants, children, and adolescents. These include pre-visit questionnaires, visit documentation forms, parent and patient handouts, supplemental education handouts, and medical screening reference tables.

Contact: American Academy of Pediatrics, 345 Park Boulevard, Itasca, IL 60143, Telephone: (630) 626-6000 Secondary Telephone: (847) 434-4000 Fax: (847) 434-8000 Web Site: https://www.aap.org

Keywords: Adolescent development, Adolescent health, Anticipatory guidance, Child development, Child health, Communities, Disease prevention, Emotional development, Families, Guidelines, Health promotion, Health screening, Health supervision, Infant development, Infant health, Injury prevention, Mental health, Nutrition, Oral health, Pediatric care, Perinatal health, Physical activity, Preventive health services, Professional resources, Protective factors, Psychosocial development, Safety, Sexual health, Standards, Weight management

Hagan JF, Shaw JS, Duncan PM, eds. 2017. Bright Futures: Guidelines for health supervision of infants, children, and adolescents–Pocket guide (4th ed.). Elk Grove Village, IL: American Academy of Pediatrics, 123 pp.

Annotation: This pocket guide summarizes recommendations for promoting the healthy development of infants, children, and adolescents from birth to age 21, as well as standards for health supervision visits. Topics include lifelong health for families and communities, family support, health for children and adolescents with special health care needs, development, mental health, weight, nutrition, physical activity, oral health, use of social media, and safety and injury prevention. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: American Academy of Pediatrics, 345 Park Boulevard, Itasca, IL 60143, Telephone: (630) 626-6000 Secondary Telephone: (847) 434-4000 Fax: (847) 434-8000 Web Site: https://www.aap.org $16.95, plus shipping and handling. Document Number: ISBN 978-1-61002-082-4.

Keywords: Adolescent development, Adolescent health, Anticipatory guidance, Child development, Child health, Communities, Disease prevention, Emotional development, Families, Guidelines, Health promotion, Health screening, Health supervision, Infant development, Infant health, Injury prevention, Mental health, Nutrition, Oral health, Pediatric care, Perinatal health, Physical activity, Preventive health services, Protective factors, Psychosocial development, Safety, Sexual health, Standards, Weight management

Hagan JF, Shaw JS, Duncan PM, eds. 2017. Bright Futures: Guidelines for health supervision of infants, children and adolescents (4th ed.). Itasca, IL: American Academy of Pediatrics, 868 pp.

Annotation: These guidelines provide background information and recommendations for promoting the healthy development of infants, children, and adolescents from birth to age 21, as well as standards for health supervision visits. Topics include lifelong health for families and communities, family support, health for children and adolescents with special health care needs, development, mental health, weight, nutrition, physical activity, oral health, use of social media, and safety and injury prevention. A pocket guide is also available. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: American Academy of Pediatrics, 345 Park Boulevard, Itasca, IL 60143, Telephone: (630) 626-6000 Secondary Telephone: (847) 434-4000 Fax: (847) 434-8000 Web Site: https://www.aap.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent development, Adolescent health, Anticipatory guidance, Child development, Child health, Communities, Disease prevention, Emotional development, Families, Guidelines, Health promotion, Health screening, Health supervision, Infant development, Infant health, Injury prevention, Mental health, Nutrition, Oral health, Pediatric care, Perinatal health, Physical activity, Preventive health services, Protective factors, Psychosocial development, Safety, Sexual health, Standards, Weight management

Demissie Z, Brener ND, McManus T, Shanklin SL, Hawkins J, Kann L. 2015. School health profiles: Characteristics of health programs among secondary schools. Atlanta, GA: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 191 pp.

Annotation: This report summarizes a biennial survey of middle and high school principals and lead health education teachers to assess school health policies and practices in states, large urban school districts, and territories. Topics include school health education requirements and content, physical education and physical activity, practices related to bullying and sexual harassment, school health policies related to tobacco-use prevention and nutrition, school-based health services, family engagement and community involvement, and school health coordination. Maps, questionnaires, and data files are also available.

Contact: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 1600 Clifton Road, Atlanta, GA 30329-4027, Telephone: (800) 232-4636 Secondary Telephone: (888) 232-6348 E-mail: cdcinfo@cdc.gov Web Site: http://www.cdc.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Bullying, Community participation, Family school relations, Health policy, Nutrition, Physical activity, Physical education, Prevention programs, Program coordination, School health education, School health programs, School health services, School safety, Service coordination, Sexual harassment, Statistics, Surveys, Tobacco use, Trends

Fox HB, McManus MA. 2007. Making the case for addressing adolescent health care. Washington, DC: Incenter Strategies, 5 pp. (Fact sheet; no. 3)

Annotation: This fact sheet discusses the importance of providing adolescents with needed primary and behavioral health services. The fact sheet provides background on adolescent health and some of the health problems that adolescents face, including high-risk behaviors, insufficient physical activity, and poor nutritional habits, among others. Also discussed are adolescents' unmet health care needs, lack of health insurance among adolescents from low-income and minority groups, and the need to endorse the positive youth development philosphy as the essential framework for adolescent health policies and programs.

Contact: National Alliance to Advance Adolescent Health, 1615 M Street, N.W., Washington, DC 20036, Telephone: (202) 223-1500 Fax: (202) 429-3557 E-mail: info@thenationalalliance.org Web Site: http://www.thenationalalliance.org/ Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent behavior, Adolescent development, Adolescent health, Adolescent sexuality, Health care delivery, Health insurance, High risk adolescents, Low income groups, Low income groups, Nutrition, Physical activity, Public policy, Racial factors

U.S. Health Resources and Services Administration, Office of Women's Health. 2007. Teen survival guide: Health tips for on-the-go girls. Washington, DC: Office of Women's Health, U.S.Health Resources and Services Administration, 76 pp.

Annotation: This publication, which is geared toward adolescent girls, provides health information presented in a reader-friendly manner. Topics covered include (1) taking care of your reproductive health, (2) taking care of a beautiful you, inside and out, (3) feeling good about yourself, (4) taking charge of your world, and (5) planning your future. A glossary is included.

Contact: National Women's Health Information Center, 8270 Willow Oaks Corporate Drive, Fairfax, VA 22031, Telephone: (800) 994-9662 Secondary Telephone: (888) 220-5446 Fax: (703) 560-6598 Web Site: http://www.womenshealth.gov Available at no charge; also available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent females, Adolescent health, Bullying, Careers, Consumer education materials, Families, Menstruation, Nutrition, Peer pressure, Physical activity, Reproductive health, Safety, Self-esteem, Sexually transmitted infections, Stress, Substance abuse

Eaton DK, Kann L, Kinchen S, Ross J, Hawkins Harris, WA, Lowery R, McManus T, Chyen D, Shanklin S, Lim C, Grunbaum J, Wechsler H. 2006. Youth risk behavior surveillance: United States, 2005. MMWR Surveillance Summaries 55(SS-5):1-96,

Annotation: This report on youth risk behavior surveillance summarizes data from the 2005 national Youth Risk Behavior survey and trends during 1991-2005 in selected risk behaviors. Data from 40 state surveys and 21 local surveys are also included. The report describes the study methods, presents results, and offers a discussion and conclusion. Extensive tables and charts present statistical findings. References are included.

Keywords: AIDS, Adolescent health, Adolescent pregnancy, Adolescents, Alcohol, Behavior, Dietary practices, Drug use, HIV, Helmets, Injuries, Obesity, Physical activity, Physical education, Physical fighting, Prevention programs, Risk factors, Seat belts, Sexual behavior, Statistics, Suicide, Tobacco, Unintentional injuries, Weapons, Weight management

Monson N. 2006. Your six-week postpartum check-up: A health care guide for new mothers. Washington, DC: Association of Reproductive Health Professionals, 2 pp.

Annotation: This handout, which is geared toward new mothers, provides information that can help readers prepare for the 6-week postpartum visit. The handout provides information about diet, nutrition, and exercise and about physical, emotional, and sexual needs. For each category, goals are presented, along with a list of specific topics and space for the reader's notes. The document is available in English and Spanish.

Contact: Association of Reproductive Health Professionals, 1901 L Street, N.W., Suite 300, Washington, DC 20036, Telephone: (202) 466-3825 E-mail: arhp@arhp.org Web Site: http://www.arhp.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Consumer education materials, Emotions, Goals, Nutrition, Pamphlets, Physical activity, Postnatal care, Reproductive health, Sexuality, Spanish language materials, Women's health

Grunbaum J, Kann L, Kinchen S, Ross J, Hawkins J, Lowery R, Harris WA, McManus T, Chyen D, Collins J. 2004. Youth risk behavior surveillance: United States, 2003. MMWR Surveillance Summaries 53(SS-2):1-96,

Annotation: This report summarizes data from the 2003 national school-based survey and trends during 1991-2003 in selected risk behaviors. Data from 32 state surveys, and 18 of local surveys were conducted during 2003. Survey categories include behaviors contributing to unintentional injuries and violence; tobacco use; alcohol and other drug use; age of initiation of risk behaviors; sexual behavior, unintended pregnancy, and sexual disease transmission; unhealthy diets; physical inactivity; and overwieght and weight control. Extensive tables and charts present statistical findings and references are included.

Contact: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 1600 Clifton Road, Atlanta, GA 30329-4027, Telephone: (800) 232-4636 Secondary Telephone: (888) 232-6348 E-mail: cdcinfo@cdc.gov Web Site: http://www.cdc.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: AIDS, Adolescent health, Adolescent pregnancy, Adolescents, Alcohol, Behavior, Dietary practices, Drug use, HIV, Helmets, Injuries, Obesity, Physical activity, Physical education, Physical fighting, Prevention programs, Risk factors, Seat belts, Sexual behavior, Suicide, Tobacco, Unintentional injuries, Weapons, Weight management

Brindis C, Ozer E, Adams S, Park J, Lordi N, Zahnd, E, Holtby S. 2004. Health profile of California's adolescents: Findings from the 2001 California Health Interview Survey. Los Angeles, CA: UCLA Center for Health Policy Research, 22 pp.

Annotation: This report presents information about the health of California's adolescents. The report includes information from the California Health Interview Survey (CHIS) 2001 and discusses CHIS findings in the following major topic areas: (1) adult supervision and parent monitoring, (2) risky and protective behaviors, and (3) health care access and utilization. For each topic area, the report highlights significant disparities based on income, gender, and race and ethnicity. Policy implications are included. Statistical information is presented in figures throughout the report.

Contact: UCLA Center for Health Policy Research, 10960 Wilshire Boulevard, Suite 1550, Los Angeles, CA 90024, Telephone: (310) 794-0909 Fax: (310) 794-2686 E-mail: chpr@ucla.edu Web Site: http://www.healthpolicy.ucla.edu Available from the website.

Keywords: Access to health care, Adolescent behavior, Adolescent health, Adolescent pregnancy, Adolescent sexuality, Alcohol use, California, Diet, Economic factors, Ethnic factors, Families, Health care utilization, Health surveys, Marijuana, Parents, Physical activity, Prevention, Racial factors, Safety, Smoking

Vermont Department of Education and Westat Survey Technical Assistance Project. 2003. The 2003 Vermont Youth Risk Behavior Survey: Statewide report. [Burlington, VT: Vermont Department of Health], 90 pp.

Annotation: This report on the 2003 Vermont Youth Risk Behavior Survey -- a survey conducted every two years to measure the prevalence of behaviors that contribute to the leading causes of death, disease, and injury among youth -- provides information about Vermont students. The information is designed to (1) monitor trends, (2) compare Vermont students with a national sample of students, and (3) plan, evaluate, and improve community and school programs that prevent health problems and promote healthy behaviors. The report includes the following sections: (1) basic information, (2) injuries, violence, and safety, (3) alcohol, tobacco, and other drugs (ATOD), (4) attitudes and perceptions about ATOD, (5) sexual behavior, (6) body weight and nutrition, (7) physical activity, and (8) measures of youth assets. The report concludes with a list of references.

Contact: Vermont Department of Health, P.O. Box 70, 108 Cherry Street, Burlington, VT 05402, Telephone: (802) 863-7606 Secondary Telephone: (800) 464-4343 Fax: (802) 865-7701 Web Site: http://www.healthvermont.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent attitudes, Adolescent behavior, Adolescent morbidity, Adolescent mortality, Adolescent sexuality, Adolescents, Alcohol use, Body weight, Community programs, Injuries, Injury, Nutrition, Physical activity, Prevention, Safety, Schools, Smoking, Students, Substance abuse, Surveys, Tobacco use, Trends, Vermont, Violence

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. 2002. Youth risk behavior surveillance: United States, 2001. MMWR Surveillance Summaries 51(SS-4):1-64,

Annotation: This report summarizes data from a national survey, 34 state surveys, and 18 local surveys conducted among high school students on the topic of health risk behaviors. Survey categories include behaviors contributing to unintentional injuries and violence; tobacco use; alcohol and other drug use; sexual behavior, unintended pregnancy, and sexual disease transmission; unhealthy diets; and physical inactivity. Extensive tables and charts present statistical findings and references are included.

Contact: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 1600 Clifton Road, Atlanta, GA 30329-4027, Telephone: (800) 232-4636 Secondary Telephone: (888) 232-6348 E-mail: cdcinfo@cdc.gov Web Site: http://www.cdc.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: AIDS, Adolescent health, Adolescent pregnancy, Adolescents, Alcohol, Behavior, Dietary practices, Drug use, HIV, Helmets, Injuries, Physical activity, Physical education, Physical fighting, Prevention programs, Risk factors, Seat belts, Sexual behavior, Suicide, Tobacco, Unintentional injuries, Weapons, Weight management

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. 1998. Youth risk behavior surveillance: United States, 1997. MMWR Surveillance Summaries 47(SS-3):1-92,

Annotation: This report summarizes data from a national survey, 33 state surveys, 3 territorial surveys, and 17 local surveys conducted among high school students from February through May 1997. Survey categories include behaviors contributing to unintentional injuries and violence; tobacco use; alcohol and other drug use; sexual behavior, unintended pregnancy, and sexual disease transmission; unhealthy diets; and physical inactivity. Extensive tables and charts present statistical findings and references are included.

Contact: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 1600 Clifton Road, Atlanta, GA 30329-4027, Telephone: (800) 232-4636 Secondary Telephone: (888) 232-6348 E-mail: cdcinfo@cdc.gov Web Site: http://www.cdc.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: AIDS, Adolescent health, Adolescent pregnancy, Adolescents, Alcohol, Behavior, Dietary practices, Drug use, HIV, Helmets, Injuries, Physical activity, Physical education, Physical fighting, Prevention programs, Risk factors, Seat belts, Sexual behavior, Suicide, Tobacco, Unintentional injuries, Weapons, Weight management

   

This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number U02MC31613, MCH Advanced Education Policy, $3.5 M. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.