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Strengthening the evidence for maternal and child health programs

Search Results: MCHLine

Items in this list may be obtained from the sources cited. Contact information reflects the most current data about the source that has been provided to the MCH Digital Library.


Displaying records 1 through 20 (77 total).

Hagan JF Jr. 2019. Making Bright Futures work: How evidence, the periodicity schedule, and the Bright Futures guidelines impact practice. Itasca, IL: American Academy of Pediatrrics, 1 video (58 min.).

Annotation: This video reviews new clinical content in the Bright Futures Guidelines and the associated Periodicity Schedule, and discusses how to use evidence to decide on content for your practice's health supervision visits and how to identify strategies, tools, and resources to maximize efficiency for health promotion and preventive services.

Contact: American Academy of Pediatrics, 345 Park Boulevard, Itasca, IL 60143, Telephone: (630) 626-6000 Secondary Telephone: (847) 434-4000 Fax: (847) 434-8000 Web Site: https://www.aap.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent development, Adolescent health, Anticipatory guidance, Child development, Child health, Communities, Disease prevention, Emotional development, Evidence based medicine, Families, Guidelines, Health promotion, Health screening, Health supervision, Infant development, Infant health, Injury prevention, Mental health, Nutrition, Oral health, Pediatric care, Perinatal health, Physical activity, Preventive health services, Protective factors, Psychosocial development, Safety, Sexual health, Standards, Videos, Weight management

Amercan Academy of Pediatrics. 2018. Bright Futures tool and resource kit (2nd ed.). Itasca, IL: Amercan Academy of Pediatrics,

Annotation: This companion to the most current edition of the Bright Futures Guidelines for Health Supervision of Infants, Children and Adolescents, the national standard for well-child care provides updated forms and materials relate to preventive health supervision and health screening for infants, children, and adolescents. These include pre-visit questionnaires, visit documentation forms, parent and patient handouts, supplemental education handouts, and medical screening reference tables.

Contact: American Academy of Pediatrics, 345 Park Boulevard, Itasca, IL 60143, Telephone: (630) 626-6000 Secondary Telephone: (847) 434-4000 Fax: (847) 434-8000 Web Site: https://www.aap.org

Keywords: Adolescent development, Adolescent health, Anticipatory guidance, Child development, Child health, Communities, Disease prevention, Emotional development, Families, Guidelines, Health promotion, Health screening, Health supervision, Infant development, Infant health, Injury prevention, Mental health, Nutrition, Oral health, Pediatric care, Perinatal health, Physical activity, Preventive health services, Professional resources, Protective factors, Psychosocial development, Safety, Sexual health, Standards, Weight management

Hagan JF, Shaw JS, Duncan PM, eds. 2017. Bright Futures: Guidelines for health supervision of infants, children, and adolescents–Pocket guide (4th ed.). Elk Grove Village, IL: American Academy of Pediatrics, 123 pp.

Annotation: These guidelines provide background information and recommendations for promoting the healthy development of infants, children, and adolescents from birth to age 21, as well as standards for health supervision visits. Topics include lifelong health for families and communities, family support, health for children and adolescents with special health care needs, development, mental health, weight, nutrition, physical activity, oral health, use of social media, and safety and injury prevention. A pocket guide is also available. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: American Academy of Pediatrics, 345 Park Boulevard, Itasca, IL 60143, Telephone: (630) 626-6000 Secondary Telephone: (847) 434-4000 Fax: (847) 434-8000 Web Site: https://www.aap.org $16.95, plus shipping and handling. Document Number: ISBN 978-1-61002-082-4.

Keywords: Adolescent development, Adolescent health, Anticipatory guidance, Child development, Child health, Communities, Disease prevention, Emotional development, Families, Guidelines, Health promotion, Health screening, Health supervision, Infant development, Infant health, Injury prevention, Mental health, Nutrition, Oral health, Pediatric care, Perinatal health, Physical activity, Preventive health services, Protective factors, Psychosocial development, Safety, Sexual health, Standards, Weight management

Epstein R, Gonzalez T. 2017. Gender & trauma: Somatic interventions for girls in juvenile justice–Implications for policy and practice. Washington, DC: Georgetown Law Center on Poverty and Inequality, 37 pp.

Annotation: This report provides a foundational understanding of the relationship between trauma and gender -- with a focus on system-involved girls -- and provides an analysis of somatic interventions. In particular, the report maps the ways in which trauma-informed, gender-responsive, and culturally competent yoga and mindfulness programs can address the short- and long-term impact of trauma on girls in the juvenile justice system. Topics include the core components of somatic interventions for traumatized girls, data documenting positive effects, and specific policy and practice recommendations to increase access for system-involved girls.

Contact: Georgetown Law, Center on Poverty and Inequality, 600 New Jersey Avenue, S.W., Washington, DC 20001, Telephone: (202) 661-6692 E-mail: povertycenter@law.georgetown.edu Web Site: http://www.law.georgetown.edu/academics/centers-institutes/poverty-inequality/index.cfm Available from the website.

Keywords: Access to health care, Adolescent females, Culturally competent services, Ethnic factors, Intervention, Juvenile justice, Policy development, Sexuality, Therapeutics, Trauma care

Kann L, Olsen EO, McManus T, Harris WA, Shanklin SL, Flint KH, Queen B, Lowry R, Chyen D, Whittle L, Thornton J, Lim C, Yamakawa Y, Brenner N, Zaza S. 2016. Sexual identify, sex of sexual contacts, and health-related behaviors among students in grades 9–12: United States and selected sites, 2015. MMWR Surveillance Summaries 65(9):1–202,

Annotation: This report summarizes results for 118 health-related behaviors plus obesity, overweight, and asthma by sexual identity and sex of sexual contacts from the 2015 national Youth Risk Behavior Survey, 25 state surveys, and 19 large urban school district surveys conducted among students in grades 9–12. Contents include a description of the Youth Risk Behavior Surveillance System, survey methodology, and survey results for the prevalence of health-risk behaviors among sexual minority students compared with nonsexual minority students. Recommendations for reducing disparities in health-risk behaviors among sexual minority students are also included.

Contact: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 1600 Clifton Road, Atlanta, GA 30329-4027, Telephone: (800) 232-4636 Secondary Telephone: (888) 232-6348 E-mail: cdcinfo@cdc.gov Web Site: http://www.cdc.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent health, Adolescent sexuality, Adolescents, Comparative analysis, Health behavior, Health surveys, Individual characteristics, Minority groups, National surveys, Population surveillance, Prevalence, Risk factors, Risk taking, School districts, School surveys, Sex factors, Sexual behavior, Sexual health, Sexual identity, Sexual partners, State surveys, Statistical data, Urban population

Michigan State Board of Education. 2016. State Board of Education statement and guidance on safe and supportive learning environments for lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and questioning (LGBTQ) students. Lansing, MI: Michigan Department of Education, 9 pp.

Annotation: These voluntary guidelines are intended to support schools in creating an inclusive environment for all students in Michigan. Contents include best practice strategies for school districts to create a supportive learning environment with specific guidance on supporting transgender and gender nonconforming students. Definitions are included.

Contact: Michigan State Board of Education, 608 W. Allegan Street, Lansing, MI 48909, Telephone: (517) 373-3324 Web Site: http://www.michigan.gov/mde/0,4615,7-140-5373---,00.html Available from the website.

Keywords: Bullying, Child health, Child safety, Civil rights, Health promotion, Homosexuality, Injury prevention, Learning, Michigan, Nonconformity, Policy development, Protective factors, Risk factors, School districts, Schools, Sex characteristics, Sex role, Sexual harassment, Students, Violence prevention, Work force

Healthy Youth Development Prevention Research Center. 2016. 2016 Minnesota adolescent sexual health report. Minneapolis, MN: University of Minnesota, Division of General Pediatrics and Adolescent Health, 5 pp.

Annotation: This report provides information about the sexual health of adolescents in Minnesota. Contents include adolescent pregnancy and birth statistics for the period 1990–2014, including information about trends in adolescent pregnancy and birth, national comparison, and subsequent births. Additional topics include geographic and racial/ethnic disparities in adolescent pregnancy, birth, and sexually transmitted infections; sexual orientation; and adverse childhood experiences.

Contact: University of Minnesota, Division of General Pediatrics and Adolescent Health, Department of Pediatrics, 717 Delaware Street, S.E., 3rd Floor, Minneapolis, MN 55414-2959, Telephone: (612) 626-2134 Fax: (612) 6264-0997 Web Site: https://www.pediatrics.umn.edu/divisions/general-pediatrics-and-adolescent-health Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent pregnancy, Adolescents, Childbirth, Ethnic factors, Geographic factors, Health disparities, Minnesota, Risk taking, Sexual health, Sexually transmitted diseases, Statistical data, Trends

Missouri Department of Health and Senior Services, Office of Dental Health. 2016. Dental health fact sheet: Emergency department utilization for dental complaints, 1994-2014 (upd.). Jefferson City, MO: Missouri Department of Health and Senior Services, Office of Dental Health, 2 pp.

Annotation: This report provides information about emergency department (ED) use for dental complaints in Missouri. The report offers background information and examines trends in ED use according to demographic factors. Tables illustrate trends from 1994 to 2014 by age group and payment source. Information about differences in ED use between African Americans and whites and between males and females is also discussed.

Contact: Missouri Department of Health and Senior Services, Oral Health Program, P.O. Box 570, Jefferson City, MO 65102-0570, Telephone: (573) 751-6400 Fax: (573) 751-6010 E-mail: info@health.mo.gov Web Site: http://health.mo.gov/living/families/oralhealth/index.php Available from the website.

Keywords: Age factors, Emergency room data, Health insurance, Income factors, Medicaid, Missouri, Oral health, Racial factors, Sex factors, State programs, Statistical data, Trends

Littrell J. 2015. Human trafficking in America's schools. Washington, DC: U.S. Department of Education, 13 pp.

Annotation: This guide is designed to assist school officials in understanding how human trafficking impacts schools; recognizing the indicators of possible child trafficking; and developing policies, protocols, and partnerships to address and prevent the exploitation of children. Topics include child sex trafficking, child labor trafficking, deconstructing perceptions and a victim-centered approach, risk factors and predictors, what to do about suspected trafficking, recruitment, impact on learning environment, and community involvement. The guide contains a sample protocol for school districts and describes U.S. government entities combating human trafficking, publications and resources, training, services, and terms and definitions.

Contact: National Center on Safe Supportive Learning Environments, American Institutes for Research, 1000 Thomas Jefferson Street, N.W., Washington, DC 20007, Telephone: (202) 403-5000 Fax: (202) 403-5001 Web Site: http://safesupportivelearning.ed.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Child labor, Child sexual abuse, Community action, Learning, Policy development, Protective factors, Protocols, Public private partnerships, Resources for professionals, Risk factors, School age children, Schools, Training

New Mexico Department of Health, Office of Injury Prevention. 2015. New Mexico: Sexual violence free–A statewide strategic plan for the primary prevention of sexual violence 2015–2020. Santa Fe, NM: New Mexico Department of Health, Office of Injury Prevention, 66 pp.

Annotation: This document for agencies, organizations, universities, community coalitions, policymakers, prevention professionals, and other individuals interested in reducing the burden of sexual violence in New Mexico provides a framework for moving primary prevention forward. Contents include background on sexual violence and active consent, the causes and costs of sexual violence and how to prevent it, societal factors that contribute to sexual assault, priority populations, the system for responding to sexual violence in New Mexico, and a summary of progress. Methods, results, focus groups with a subset of priority populations, conclusion, and goals and objectives are included.

Contact: New Mexico Department of Health, 1190 South Saint Francis Drive, Santa Fe, NM 87505, Telephone: (505) 827-2613 Fax: (505) 827-2530 E-mail: doh-webmaster@state.nm.us Web Site: https://nmhealth.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Children, Costs, Ethnic groups, Injury prevention, Minority groups, New Mexico, Primary prevention, Risk factors, Rural populations, Sexual assault, Strategic plans, Violence prevention, Women

U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Office of Adolescent Health and Family and Youth Services Bureau. 2014-. Teen pregnancy prevention evidence review. Washington, DC: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, 1 v.

Annotation: This website provides information and resources from an ongoing independent systematic review of the adolescent pregnancy prevention research to identify programs with evidence of effectiveness in reducing adolescent pregnancy, sexually transmitted infections, and associated sexual risk behaviors. The website includes information on study quality and program models that have demonstrated positive impacts on sexual risk behavior and sexual health outcomes. Contents include a searchable database of studies included in the review, information about the review process and how the review is conducted, publications written by the review team, answers to frequently asked questions, and contact information for the study team.

Contact: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Office of the Assistant Secretary for Planning and Evaluation, Hubert H. Humphrey Building, 200 Independence Avenue, S.W., Room 415 F, Washington, DC 20201, Web Site: http://aspe.hhs.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent health, Adolescent pregnancy, Adolescents, Health behavior, Literature reviews, Prevention programs, Program models, Research methodology, Risk factors, Sexual health, Sexually transmitted diseases

Kearney MS, Levine PB. 2014. Media influences on social outcomes: The impact of MTV's 16 and pregnant on teen childbearing. Cambridge, MA: National Bureau of Economic Research, 43 pp. (NBER working paper series no. 19795)

Annotation: This paper explores the impact of a reality television series, MTV's 16 and Pregnant, on adolescent attitudes and outcomes. Contents include background information on the show's content and previous research on the impact of media exposure; a description of the data including Nielson ratings, Google trends, and Twitter activity; a descriptive analysis of adolescents' exposure to the show; and analyses of high frequency data on searches and tweets and data on adolescent births. Topics include changes in searches and tweets, geographic variation in viewership, and changes in adolescent birth rates.

Contact: National Bureau of Economic Research, 1050 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, MA 02138-5398, Telephone: (617) 868-3900 Fax: (617) 868-2742 E-mail: info@nber.org Web Site: http://www.nber.org $5.

Keywords: , Abortion, Adolescent attitudes, Attitude change, Behavior modification, Contraception, Economic factors, Health behavior, Interactive media, Media, Outcome evaluation, Sexual behavior

Farrukh A, Sadwick R, Villasenor J. 2014. Youth internet safety: Risks, responses, and research recommendations. Washington, DC: Center for Technology Innovation at Brookings, 18 pp.

Annotation: This paper provides an overview of research representative of the depth and breadth of publications addressing child and youth online safety. Contents include an analysis of key findings, knowledge gaps, and policy recommendations. Topics include cyberbullying, sexual solicitation and unwanted exposure to sexual content, the role of privacy, parent and community involvement, and intergenerational gaps in attitudes toward internet safety issues.

Contact: Brookings Institution, 1775 Massachusetts Avenue, N.W., Washington, DC 20036, Telephone: (202) 797-6000 Fax: (202) 797-6004 E-mail: communications@brookings.edu Web Site: http://www.brookings.edu Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescents, Bullying, Children, Communication, Confidentiality, Internet, Interpersonal relations, Measures, Online systems, Policy development, Protective factors, Psychosocial development, Research, Risk factors, Safety, Sexual harassment, Trust

Child Trends Data Bank. 2013. Steroid use: Indicators on children and youth (upd.). [Bethesda, MD]: Child Trends Data Bank, 12 pp.

Annotation: This report provides information about anabolic steroid use among students in grades 8, 10, and 12. The report discusses the importance of the issue (including health problems and behavior problems related to steroid use in adolescents); trends; differences by gender, race, and HIspanic origin, and college plans; state and local estimates; international estimates; and national goals.

Contact: Child Trends, 7315 Wisconsin Avenue, Suite 1200 W, Bethesda, MD 20814, Telephone: (240) 223-9200 E-mail: Web Site: http://www.childtrends.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent attitudes, Adolescent behavior, Adolescent health, Athletes, Eduational factors, Ethnic factors, Mental health problems, Racial factors, Risk taking, Sex factors, Statistical data, Steroids, Substance abuse, Trends

Child Trends Data Bank. 2013. "Statutory rape:" Sex between young teens and older individuals-Indicators on children and youth. Bethesda, MD: Child Trends, 14 pp.

Annotation: This report focuses on instances in which children and adolescents under age 15 engage in sexual relationships with someone at least 3 years older (statutory rape). Topics include importance; trends; differences by race and by Hispanic origin; by parental education; and by age at first sex; state, local, and international estimates; national goals; and related indicators. Statistical data are presented throughout the report. A definition of statutory rape is provided.

Contact: Child Trends, 7315 Wisconsin Avenue, Suite 1200 W, Bethesda, MD 20814, Telephone: (240) 223-9200 E-mail: Web Site: http://www.childtrends.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent behavior, Adolescent sexuality, Age factors, Educational factors, High risk adolescents, Racial factors, Rape, Risk factors, Sexual behavior, Sexual intercourse, Statistical data, Trends

Wildsmith E, Barry M, Manlov J, Vaughn B. 2013. Dating and sexual relationships. [Bethesda, MD]: Child Trends, 10 pp. (Adolescent health highlight)

Annotation: This report presents key research findings about the prevalence of and trends in adolescents' dating and sexual relationships. Additional topics include dating and sexual behaviors that may put adolescents at risk for negative outcomes; how these behaviors vary by gender, age, and race/ethnicity; and individual, family, and media influences on adolescents' sexual behaviors.

Contact: Child Trends, 7315 Wisconsin Avenue, Suite 1200 W, Bethesda, MD 20814, Telephone: (240) 223-9200 E-mail: Web Site: http://www.childtrends.org Available from the website. Document Number: Pub. no. 2013-04.

Keywords: Adolescents, Environmental influences, Relationships, Risk factors, Sexual behavior, Sexual development, Sexual health, Sexual partners

Hoyert DL. 2012. 75 years of mortality in the United States, 1935-2010. Hyattsville, MD: National Center for Health Statistics, 7 pp. (NCHS data brief, no. 88)

Annotation: This report examines long-term U.S. mortality trends by age, sex, and race, through 2010 (with preliminary data for 2010). Other topics include overall trends in deaths and risk of dying and heart disease and cancer as leading causes of death.

Contact: National Center for Health Statistics, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 3311 Toledo Road, Room 5419, Hyattsville, MD 20782, Telephone: (800) 232-4636 Secondary Telephone: (888) 232-6348 Fax: (301) 458-4020 E-mail: nchsquery@cdc.gov Web Site: http://www.cdc.gov/nchs Available from the website.

Keywords: Age factors, Cancer, Cardiovascular diseases, Death, History, Mortality, Racial factors, Research, Sex factors, Statistics, Trends, Trends

Kearney MS, Levine PB. 2012. Explaining recent trends in the U.S. teen bith rate. Cambridge, MA: National Bureau of Economic Research, 31 pp. (NBER working paper series no. 17964)

Annotation: This paper investigates possible explanations for the large decline in U.S. adolescent childbearing that occurred in the 20 years following the 1991 peak. The authors review previous evidence and the results of new analyses to arrive at a set of observations that are presented in the paper. The methodology and findings are presented.

Contact: National Bureau of Economic Research, 1050 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, MA 02138-5398, Telephone: (617) 868-3900 Fax: (617) 868-2742 E-mail: info@nber.org Web Site: http://www.nber.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Racial factors, Adolescent behavior, Adolescent parents, Adolescent pregnancy, Adolescent sexuality, Contraception, Ethnic factors, Family planning programs, Medicaid, Public policy, Research, Sexuality education, Statistical data, Trends

Akinbami LJ, Moorman JE, Bailey C, Zahran HS, King M, Johnson CA, Liu X. 2012. Trends in asthma prevalence, health care use, and mortality in the United States, 2001-2010. Hyattsville, MD: National Center for Health Statistics, 7 pp. (NCHS data brief, no. 94)

Annotation: This report presents recent data on trends in asthma prevalence, health care encounters, and mortality. Topic include differences in prevalence by age, sex, income, race, ethnicity, and demographics; rates of asthma health care encounters in primary settings, emergency departments, and hospitals; death rates; and death rate differences by sex, race, and age.

Contact: National Center for Health Statistics, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 3311 Toledo Road, Room 5419, Hyattsville, MD 20782, Telephone: (800) 232-4636 Secondary Telephone: (888) 232-6348 Fax: (301) 458-4020 E-mail: nchsquery@cdc.gov Web Site: http://www.cdc.gov/nchs Available at no charge; also available from the website.

Keywords: Age factors, Asthma, Death, Emergency room data, Ethnic factors, Health care, Hospitalization, Income factors, Mortality, Primary care, Racial factors, Sex factors, Trends

McPheeters ML, Kripalani S, Peterson, NB, Idowu RT, Jerome RN, Potter SA, Andrews JC. 2012. Quality improvement interventions to address health disparities: Closing the quality gap—Revisiting the state of the science. U.S. Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, 475 pp., exec. summ. (15 pp.). (Evidence report/technology assessment; no. 208)

Annotation: This literature review (from 1983-2011) evaluates the effectiveness of quality improvement (QI) strategies in reducing disparities in health and health care. The review focused on 12 clinical conditions and assessed health disparities associated with race or ethnicity, socioeconomic status, insurance status, sexual orientation, health literacy/numeracy, and language barrier. Contents are divided into the following sections: background on QI and health disparities approaches, scope and key questions of focus for the review, methods used, a results overview, and discussion of main findings. References, tables, and appendices are also inlcuded.

Contact: U.S. Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, 5600 Fishers Lane, Rockville, MD 20857, Telephone: (301) 427-1104 Secondary Telephone: (301) 427-1364 Web Site: http://www.ahrq.gov Available from the website. Document Number: AHRQ Pu.b No. 12-E009-EF.

Keywords: Access to health care, Barriers, Health care disparities, Health insurance, Health literacy, Health status disparities, Language barriers, Literature reviews, Minority health, Racial factors, Sexual identity, Socioeconomic status

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This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number U02MC31613, MCH Advanced Education Policy, $3.5 M. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.