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Strengthening the evidence for maternal and child health programs

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Items in this list may be obtained from the sources cited. Contact information reflects the most current data about the source that has been provided to the MCH Digital Library.


Displaying records 1 through 20 (26 total).

Johns Hopkins University, School of Hygiene and Public Health, Department of Health Policy and Management. n.d.. Child Health and Illness Profile: Adolescent Edition—[Program description packet]. Baltimore, MD: Johns Hopkins University, Department of Health Policy and Management, 44 pp.

Annotation: This information packet describes an integrated framework for a comprehensive self-report measure of adolescent health appropriate for 11 to 17 year olds who can read English on at least a fifth grade level. The six domains of health, and subdomains that make up each, are briefly described. The other enclosure provides sample questions from each of the 20 subdomains and from the demographics section. Copies of four articles about this program are also included. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health, Department of Health Policy and Management, 624 North Broadway, Suite 493, Baltimore, MD 21205, Telephone: (410) 955-3625 Contact Phone: (410) 955-9725 Fax: (410) 614-9152 Contact E-mail: ariley@jhsph.edu Web Site: http://www.jhsph.edu/HPM Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent health, Child health, Measures, Questionnaires, Self evaluation

Wyatt R, Laderman M, Botwinick L, Mate K, Whittington J. 2016. Achieving health equity: A guide for health care organizations. Cambridge, MA: Institute for Healthcare Improvement , 45 pp.

Annotation: This paper provides a framework for health care organizations to improve health equity in the communities they serve. Topics include making health equity a strategic priority, developing structure and processes to support health equity work, deploying specific strategies to address the multiple determinants of health on which health care organizations can have a direct impact, decreasing institutional racism within the organization, and developing partnerships with community organizations to improve health and equity. The paper also describes practical issues in measuring health equity, presents a case study of the Henry Ford Health System, and includes a self-assessment tool for health care organizations to assess their current state related to each component of the framework.

Contact: Institute for Healthcare Improvement , 20 University Road, Seventh Floor , Cambridge , MA 02138, Telephone: (617) 301-4800 Secondary Telephone: (866) 787-0831 Fax: (617) 301-4830 E-mail: info@ihi.org Web Site: http://www.ihi.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Community participation, Discrimination, Equal opportunities, Health care delivery, Health disparities, Health systems agencies, Inclusion, Measures, Organizational change, Program improvement, Quality assurance, Self evaluation, Social bias

National Center for Cultural Competence. 2016. Cultural & linguistic competence health practitioner assessment. Washington, DC: National Center for Cultural Competence, 1 v.

Annotation: This self-guided learning activity is designed to enhance the delivery of high-quality services for diverse patient/client populations and promote cultural and linguistic competence as essential approaches to address disparities in health and health care. Users who complete the assessment receive scores, including scores compared to a norming sample, in the following three areas: knowledge of culturally and linguistically diverse populations, adapting practice for culturally and linguistically diverse patient populations, and promoting the health of culturally and linguistically diverse communities. Users also receive a customized set of related professional development and educational resources based on their responses. The report can be downloaded and saved.

Contact: National Center for Cultural Competence, Georgetown University Center for Child and Human Development, P.O. Box 571485, Washington, DC 20057-1485, Telephone: (202) 687-5387 Secondary Telephone: (800) 788-2066 Fax: (202) 687-8899 E-mail: cultural@georgetown.edu Web Site: http://nccc.georgetown.edu Available from the website.

Keywords: Communication skills, Cultural competence, Health care delivery, Health care disparities, Health disparities, Health promotion, Patient care, Self evaluation

U.S. Maternal and Child Health Bureau, Division of MCH Workforce Development. 2015. Self-assessment. Washington, DC: Georgetown University Health Information Group,

Annotation: This resource is designed to help students and professionals use the Maternal and Child (MCH) Leadership Competencies. The competencies represent a set of skills desirable for practice that professionals may want to possess as they work to protect and improve the health of MCH populations. The self-assessment can help students and professionals determine their level of knowledge and skill with respect to each of the domains that comprise the MCH competencies, and can serve as a starting point for identifying professional development needs and developing training plans. A brochure and video describing the self-assessment are also available. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: Health Information Group at Georgetown University, McCourt School of Public Policy, Box 571271, Washington, DC 20057-1272, E-mail: richarjt@georgetown.edu Web Site: http://www.healthinfogroup.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Competency based education, Leadership, Program planning, Resources for professionals, Self evaluation, Staff development, Training, Work force

U.S. Administration for Children and Families, Office of the Deputy Assistant Secretary for Early Childhood Development. 2015. Early childhood self-assessment tool for family shelters (upd.). Washington, DC: U.S. Administration for Children and Families, Office of the Deputy Assistant Secretary for Early Childhood Development, 20 pp.

Annotation: This tool for shelter staff members contains recommendations and information on how family shelter environments, programming, policies, and staff can support early childhood safety and development. The tool contains recommendations for making shelter facilities safe and developmentally appropriate for infants, toddlers, and preschoolers in five areas: health and safety, wellness and development, work force standards and training, programming, and food and nutrition. The tool categorizes recommendations by the estimated amount of resources requires. Links to references referenced in the tool and an action plan form are also included.

Contact: U.S. Administration for Children and Families, Office of the Deputy Assistant Secretary and Interdepartmental Liaison for Early Childhood Development, 370 L'Enfant Promenade, S.W., Washington, DC 20447, Telephone: (202) 401-9200 Fax: (202) 205-4891 Web Site: http://www.acf.hhs.gov/programs/ecd/about Available from the website.

Keywords: Child safety, Community action, Community health services, Early childhood development, Families, Family support programs, Homelessness, Infants, Nutrition, Policy development, Preschool children, Program development, Self evaluation, Shelters, Standards, Toddlers, Training, Work force

National Association of Chronic Disease Directors. 2014. State health department organizational self-assessment for achieving health equity: Toolkit and guide to implementation. Atlanta, GA: National Association of Chronic Disease Directors, 89 pp.

Quinonez RB, Boggess K. 2013–. Prenatal oral health program (pOHP). Chapel Hill, NC: University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill School of Dentistry, and School of Medicine, 1 v.

Annotation: These resources are designed to help prenatal primary care professionals and oral health care teams implement and deliver preventive oral health services to women, including those who are pregnant. Contents include videos, guidelines, a referral form and follow-up report card, and a periodicity table. Additional resources for new mothers and pregnant women—including videos on oral health care for pregnant women and infants, a self-evaluation, and a provider locator—are also available in English and Spanish.

Contact: University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill School of Dentistry, Department of Pediatric Dentistry, Manning Drive and Columbia Street, CB #7450, Chapel Hill, NC 27599-7450, Telephone: (919) 537-3737 Fax: (919) 966-7992 Web Site: https://www.dentistry.unc.edu/about/departments-units/pedo/ Available from the website.

Keywords: Consumer education materials, Continuing education, Forms, Multimedia, Oral health, Pregnant women, Prenatal care, Prevention services, Self evaluation, Spanish language materials, Training

Michigan Oral Health Coalition. 2012. Kindergarten round-up oral health assessment: Clare public schools and Harrison community schools. Lansing, MI: Michigan Oral Health Coalition, 6 pp.

Annotation: This report presents findings on oral health among children entering kindergarten in two Michigan school districts. Contents include key findings from oral health screenings conducted by dental hygienists and parent assessment. The report provides information about early childhood caries, treatment urgency, white spot lesions, teeth with untreated decay, treated teeth, and primary teeth by school district, insurance status, and gender.

Contact: Michigan Oral Health Coalition, 106 W. Allegan Street, Suite 310, Lansing, MI 48933, Telephone: (517) 827-0466 Fax: (517) 381-8008 Web Site: http://www.mohc.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Children, Dental caries, Elementary schools, Health status, Kindergarten, Measures, Michigan, Oral health, Parents, School districts, Screening, Self evaluation, State surveys, Statistical data

Goode TD. 2010. A guide for using the Cultural and Linguistic Competence Family Organization Assessment instrument. Washington, DC: National Center for Cultural Competence, 28 pp.

Annotation: This guide explains how to use the Cultural and Linguistic Competence Family Organization Assessment (CLCFOA) Instrument developed by the National Center for Cultural Competence to address the unique functions of family organizations concerned with children and youth with mental, emotional, and behavioral health disorders, special health care needs, and disabilities. The guide provides a detailed description of the CLCFOA; describes a four-phase approach to self assessment; and offers practical steps to help make the self assessment process work for family organizations. It explains how to score the CLCFOA, how to analyze and report data from it, and how to develop an implement an action plan. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Center for Cultural Competence, Georgetown University Center for Child and Human Development, P.O. Box 571485, Washington, DC 20057-1485, Telephone: (202) 687-5387 Secondary Telephone: (800) 788-2066 Fax: (202) 687-8899 E-mail: cultural@georgetown.edu Web Site: http://nccc.georgetown.edu Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescents with developmental disabilities, Assessment, Children with developmental disabilities, Children with special health care needs, Culturally competent services, Family centered services, Self evaluation

Goode T, Trivedi P, Jones W. 2010. Cultural and linguistic competence assessment for disability organizations. Washington, DC: National Center for Cultural Competence, 1 v.

Annotation: This self-assessment instrument and companion usage guide are intended to help organizations that focus on disabilities evaluate their own cultural and linguistic competence. The assessment tool is designed to help disability organizations (1) plan for and incorporate culturally and linguistically competent values, policies, structures, and practices in all aspects of their work; (2) enhance the quality of services, supports, and advocacy provided to diverse and underserved communities; (3) effect change in education, training, technical assistance, research, and public policy; and (4) advance cultural and linguistic competence as an essential approach to address racial and ethnic disparities and promote equity for people who experience disabilities and their families. Definitions and key concepts are included, along with guidelines for completing the assessment questionnaire. The companion usage guide describes the four-phase approach to self-assessment encouraged by the National Center for Cultural Competence and explains how it can be adapted to meet the specific needs of an organization.

Contact: National Center for Cultural Competence, Georgetown University Center for Child and Human Development, P.O. Box 571485, Washington, DC 20057-1485, Telephone: (202) 687-5387 Secondary Telephone: (800) 788-2066 Fax: (202) 687-8899 E-mail: cultural@georgetown.edu Web Site: http://nccc.georgetown.edu Available from the website.

Keywords: Assessment, Cultural competence, Culturally competent services, Disabilities, Organizations, Self evaluation

Goode TD. 2010. A guide for using the cultural and linguistic competence sssessment for disability organizations. Washington, DC: National Center for Cultural Competence, 29 pp.

Annotation: This self-assessment and companion user's guide are designed to help organizations that focus on disabilities (1) plan for and incorporate culturally and linguistically competent values, policies, structures, and practices in all aspects of their work; (2) enhance the quality of services, supports, and advocacy provided to diverse and underserved communities; (3) effect change in education, training, technical assistance, research, and public policy; and (4) advance cultural and linguistic competence as an essential approach to address racial and ethnic disparities and promote equity for people who experience disabilities. The guide includes a description of the four-phase approach to self assessment supported by the National Center for Cultural Competency; and steps to help make the self-assessment process work for your organization. Appendices include definitions and key concepts along with suggested interview questions should you choose to seek augmented data.

Contact: National Center for Cultural Competence, Georgetown University Center for Child and Human Development, P.O. Box 571485, Washington, DC 20057-1485, Telephone: (202) 687-5387 Secondary Telephone: (800) 788-2066 Fax: (202) 687-8899 E-mail: cultural@georgetown.edu Web Site: http://nccc.georgetown.edu Available from the website.

Keywords: Assessment, Cultural competence, Culturally competent services, Disabilities, Organizations, Self evaluation

Goode TD. 2009. Promoting cultural diversity and cultural competency: Self-assessment checklist for personnel providing services and supports to individuals and families affected by sudden and unexpected infant death (SUID) [rev. ed.]. Washington, DC: Georgetown University, Center for Child and Human Development, 4 pp.

Annotation: This checklist is intended to heighten awareness and sensitivity of personnel to the importance of cultural diversity and cultural competence in settings that serve individuals and families experiencing sudden and unexpected infant death. Questions focus on areas including physical environment, materials and resources; communications styles; and values and attitudes.

Contact: Georgetown University Center for Child and Human Development, Box 571485, Washington, DC 20057-1485, Telephone: (202) 687-5503 Secondary Telephone: (202) 687-5000 Fax: (202) 687-8899 E-mail: gucdc@georgetown.edu Web Site: http://gucchd.georgetown.edu Available from the website.

Keywords: Cultural diversity, Cultural sensitivity, Culturally competent services, Infant death, Infant mortality, SIDS, Self evaluation

U.S. Health Resources and Services Administration, Office on Women's Health. 2007. Bright Futures: A community organization's guide to promoting emotional wellness. [Rockville, MD]: U.S. Health Resources and Services Administration, Office on Women's Health, 35 pp. (Bright futures for women's health and wellness)

Annotation: This guide, which is geared toward community organizations that provide services to women, provides information on emotional wellness and tips and suggestions that organizations can use to promote wellness. The guide includes the following sections: (1) about women and emotional wellness, (2) tips to promote emotional wellness, (3) program ideas to promote emotional wellness, (4) when to host a wellness program or activity, (5) how to organize and evaluate a program or activity, and (6) resources.

Contact: Maternal and Child Health Library at Georgetown University, Box 571272, Washington, DC 20057-1272, Telephone: (202) 784-9770 E-mail: mchgroup@georgetown.edu Web Site: https://www.mchlibrary.org Up to five copies available at no charge; also available from the website. Document Number: HRSA Info. Ctr. MCH00245.

Keywords: Communication, Community based services, Community health services, Community programs, Depression, Education, Evaluation, Health promotion, Mental health, Relationships, Research, Self concept, Self esteem, Women's health

Lazear K, Roggenbaum S, Blase K. 2004. Youth suicide prevention school-based guide: Overview. [Miami, FL]: Louis de la Parte Florida Mental Health Institute, 1 v.

Annotation: This guide provides a framework for school to address their existing or proposed suicide prevention efforts (through a series of checklists) and provides resources and information that school administrators can use to enhance or add to their existing program. The guide identifies and defines the elements of a comprehensive school-based suicide prevention program, examines the scientific literature to determine which of these elements have been proven to work in reducing the incidence of suicide, and contains checklists and self-assessment instruments that may be completed by schools to evaluated the adequacy of their suicide prevention programs.

Contact: Louis de la Parte Florida Mental Health Institute, University of South Florida, 13301 Bruce B. Downs Boulevard, Tampa, FL 33612-3809, Telephone: (813) 974-4602 Fax: (813) 974-7633 E-mail: Web Site: http://www.fmhi.usf.edu/ Available from the website.

Keywords: Administration, Adolescents, Children, Guidelines, Program evaluation, Resource materials, School age children, Schools, Self evaluation, Suicide, Suicide prevention

Wulff LM, Arnold J. 2003. Pilot of ASIP SIDS and other infant death program evaluation plan: Final report. Minneapolis, MN: Association of SIDS and Infant Mortality Programs, 27 pp.

Annotation: This report describes the outcomes of a pilot project to test a program evaluation plan that was designed to implement a goal-oriented evaluation of comprehensive sudden infant death syndrome and other infant death (SIDS/ID) programs. The report describes the SIDS/ID programs of the three states that participated in the project (Massachusetts, Michigan, and Utah) and discusses the programs' experiences in conducting the evaluation. It includes recommendations, a chart of data sources and procedures for evaluating various program components, a suggested family survey form, and a technical consultants' data collection tool. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: Maternal and Child Health Library at Georgetown University, Box 571272, Washington, DC 20057-1272, Telephone: (202) 784-9770 E-mail: mchgroup@georgetown.edu Web Site: https://www.mchlibrary.org Available from the website. Document Number: HRSA Info. Ctr. MCH00110.

Keywords: Infant mortality, Massachusetts, Michigan, Prevention programs, SIDS, Self evaluation, State programs, Surveys, Utah

Goode TD, Jones W, Mason J. 2002. A guide to planning and implementing cultural competence organizational self-assessment. Washington, DC: National Center for Cultural Competence, 6 pp.

Annotation: This paper describes a rationale for organizational cultural competence self-assessment, essential elements in achieving cultural competence, and the benefits of self-assessment. It lists values and guiding principles of self-assessment and useful steps for planning and implementing self-assessment. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Center for Cultural Competence, Georgetown University Center for Child and Human Development, P.O. Box 571485, Washington, DC 20057-1485, Telephone: (202) 687-5387 Secondary Telephone: (800) 788-2066 Fax: (202) 687-8899 E-mail: cultural@georgetown.edu Web Site: http://nccc.georgetown.edu Available from the website.

Keywords: Cultural competence, Culturally competent services, Organizational change, Organizations, Self evaluation

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. 2000. School health index for physical activity and healthy eating: A self-assessment and planning guide—Elementary school. Atlanta, GA: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 126 pp.

Annotation: This manual is a self assessment and planning guide to assist educators in developing elementary school programs to promote physical fitness and healthy eating. The assessment tools are divided into eight modules which are: (1) school policies and environment; (2) health education; (3) physical education; (4) nutrition services; (5) school health services; (6) school counseling, psychological, and social services; (7) health promotion for staff; and (8) family and community involvement. The final sections of the manual discuss planning for improvement and list additional resources.

Contact: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 1600 Clifton Road, Atlanta, GA 30329-4027, Telephone: (800) 232-4636 Secondary Telephone: (888) 232-6348 E-mail: cdcinfo@cdc.gov Web Site: http://www.cdc.gov Available in libraries.

Keywords: Community participation, Educational programs, Elementary schools, Families, Guidelines, Health planning, Health policy, Manual, Nutrition policy, Physical activity, Policy analysis, Policy development, School health education, School linked programs, Self evaluation

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. 2000. School health index for physical activity and healthy eating: A self-assessment and planning guide—Middle school/high school. Atlanta, GA: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 130 pp.

Annotation: This manual is a self assessment and planning guide to assist educators in developing middle and high school programs to promote physical fitness and healthy eating. The assessment tools are divided into eight modules which are: (1) school policies and environment; (2) health education; (3) physical education; (4) nutrition services; (5) school health services; (6) school counseling, psychological, and social services; (7) health promotion for staff; and (8) family and community involvement. The final sections of the manual discuss planning for improvement and list additional resources.

Contact: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 1600 Clifton Road, Atlanta, GA 30329-4027, Telephone: (800) 232-4636 Secondary Telephone: (888) 232-6348 E-mail: cdcinfo@cdc.gov Web Site: http://www.cdc.gov Available in libraries.

Keywords: Community participation, Educational programs, Families, Guidelines, Health planning, Health policy, High schools, Manual, Middle schools, Nutrition policy, Physical activity, Policy analysis, Policy development, School health education, School linked programs, Self evaluation

U.S. Health Resources and Services Administration. 1997. Health information technology: Self-assessment tool for primary health care providers. Rockville, MD: U.S. Health Resources and Services Administration, 172 pp.

Annotation: This manual provides a self-assessment tool for primary health care providers to determine if they and their facilities have a need to increase their information technology level so their organizations become more efficient. It covers all aspects of the organization, including scheduling, claims processing, records, and marketing. The tool is also designed to help health care providers create a request for proposal (RFP) to vendors so they more accurately determine a facility's need for increased technology. It is largely divided into 10 steps: 1) administrative site/satellites, 2) functional process map, 3) process dimension, 4) physical space, 5) projections of change, 6) the compelling salesperson, 7) the discovery RFP, 8) cost/benefit analysis, 9) the final RFP, and 10) results analysis. Appendices include sample RFP's, employee readiness surveys, sample status reports, and definitions of terms.

Keywords: Evaluation methods, Health facility administrators, Health facility planning, Information networks, Information services, Information systems, Needs assessment, Primary care facilities, Requests for proposals, Self evaluation, Technology

Murphy S, Hanson J, Lapidus J. 1997. A telephone educational intervention for rural children with asthma. Arlington, VA: National Center for Education in Maternal and Child Health, 11 pp. (Research roundtable summary; no. 15)

Annotation: This report summarizes a Maternal and Child Health Bureau funded project presented at a seminar May 2, 1997. The project reported on self-management of chronic asthma by children and their families living in rural communities in New Mexico. It focuses on self-management programs teaching children and their parents effective ways to manage asthma with phone followup by nurse educators to reduce reliance on the health care system. The report ends with a discussion of the project and a list of publications. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Center for Education in Maternal and Child Health, Georgetown University, Box 571272, Washington, DC 20057-1272, Telephone: (202) 784-9770 E-mail: mchgroup@georgetown.edu Web Site: https://www.ncemch.org Photocopy available at no charge; also available from the website.

Keywords: Asthma, Children with special health care needs, Evaluation methods, Followup studies, Health care delivery, MCH research, New Mexico, Nursing services, Rural population, Self care, State programs

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This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number U02MC31613, MCH Advanced Education Policy, $3.5 M. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.