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Strengthening the evidence for maternal and child health programs

Search Results: MCHLine

Items in this list may be obtained from the sources cited. Contact information reflects the most current data about the source that has been provided to the MCH Digital Library.


Displaying records 1 through 17 (17 total).

n.d.. Posters. No place: No publisher, 9 posters.

Annotation: Each poster in this collection was prepared by an insurance company or a state agency. They direct attention to various issues in child safety. A poster by American Re-Insurance Company shows a child with his head bandaged, and cites the statistic on injuries when bike helmets are not worn. A second poster by American Re-Insurance Company repeats the statistic, but illustrates it with an overturned bike. The New York State Health Department poster shows a cross section of a house in which a hazardous activity is pictured in each room. The viewer is told that these hazards number forty, and is asked to identify them. The reverse side of the poster shows the answers. The remaining posters are by Massachusetts health and safety agencies. One shows a baby in a car seat and points out safety features of the seat. Another shows two gallon jugs: one of milk and one of bleach. The viewer is made to realize that a two year old would not know the difference. Three posters reinforce the "buckle up" message, and there is one on playground safety. Both English and Spanish are used in the posters.

Contact: Massachusetts Department of Public Health, Injury Prevention and Control Program, 250 Washington Street, Fourth Floor, Boston, MA 02108, Telephone: (617) 624-5557 Contact Phone: (617) 727-1246 Price unknown.

Keywords: Bicycles, Car seats, Helmets, Poisoning, Posters, Residential injuries, Seat belts, Spanish language materials

Davidson L. n.d.. Demonstration Projects for Pediatric EMS Systems Components: [Final report]. Mobile, AL: University of South Alabama College of Medicine, 104 pp.

Annotation: The overall goal of the this project was to demonstrate effective models for the necessary components of an emergency medical services for children (EMSC) system and the integration of those components into currently operating adult-oriented systems. The project has outlined the six major components of an EMSC system: (l) System description, (2) prevention, (3) education, (4) standards of care, (5) quality assurance, and (6) research and development. The project comprised seven subprojects whose activities included educating the public, the prehospital care provider, and the rural physician about the assessment and management of pediatric emergencies; comparing the efficacy of ground versus air transport; defining the degree of psychological impairment caused by head injury; identifying the rehabilitation facilities available locally, regionally, and nationally; and increasing compliance with safety belt/child restraint legislation. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Technical Information Service, U.S. Department of Commerce, 5301 Shawnee Road, Alexandria, VA 22312, Telephone: (703) 605-6050 Secondary Telephone: (888) 584-8332 E-mail: customerservice@ntis.gov Web Site: http://www.ntis.gov Document Number: NTIS PB92-103332.

Keywords: Cost-Benefit Analysis, Data Collection, Emergency Medical Services, Emergency medical technicians, Facilities For, First Aid, Head Injuries, Health Professionals, Paramedics, Rehabilitation, Seat Belts/Restraints for Children

Spaite D. n.d.. Arizona Emergency Medical Services for Children [Final report]. Tucson, AZ: University of Arizona, 23 pp.

Annotation: The overall goal of the Arizona EMSC project was to reduce childhood mortality and morbidity by (1) providing broad-based training and education in pediatric emergency care to medical personnel involved in the prehospital and early hospital emergency medical care, and (2) helping establish childhood injury prevention programs throughout the State. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Technical Information Service, U.S. Department of Commerce, 5301 Shawnee Road, Alexandria, VA 22312, Telephone: (703) 605-6050 Secondary Telephone: (888) 584-8332 E-mail: customerservice@ntis.gov Web Site: http://www.ntis.gov Document Number: NTIS PB97-121909.

Keywords: Bicycle Helmets, Bicycle Safety, Car seats, Drowning, Emergency Medical Services for Children, Injury Prevention, Pediatric Advanced Life Support Programs, Professional Education in EMSC, Seat Belts

National Highway Traffic Safety Administration. 2012-. Parents central: From car seats to car keys--Keeping kids safe. Washington, DC: National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, multiple items.

Annotation: This website for parents provides information about keeping children safe while they are riding in motor vehicles, riding bicycles, or walking. Information is provided about car seat safety, safety related to school buses and bicycles, how to keep adolescents safe as they are learning to drive, and car-related safety issues such as backovers, heatstroke, seatbelt entanglement, and trunk entrapment.

Contact: National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, 1200 New Jersey Avenue, S.E., West Building, Washington, DC 20590, Telephone: (888) 327-4236 Secondary Telephone: (800)424-9153 Web Site: http://www.nhtsa.dot.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescents, Bicycle safety, Car seats, Child safety, Consumer education materials, Infants, Injury prevention, Motor vehicle injuries, Motor vehicle safety, Safety, School buses, Seat belts, Traffic safety, Walking, Young children

Kuhn M, Lam J. 2008. Increasing seat belt use among 8- to 15-year-olds. Washington, DC: National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, 121 pp.

Annotation: This report describes a research project that aimed to determine the nature and causes of non-use of seat belts among 8- to 15- year-olds and to recommend interventions and strategic approaches to increase usage among this age group. This report provides detailed background information from three phases of research: a literature review; 28 in-home family immersion interviews conducted in Illinois, Georgia, and Arizona; and detailed findings from qualitative testing of intervention concepts through 96 triads among children and adolescents aged 8-15, six focus groups with parents in Pennsylvania, Iowa, Wisconsin, and California, and two focus groups with adult and adolescent influencers in Iowa and California. Interventions tested included those based on new products, community and school influence, communication, and key influencers (parents and older adolescents).

Contact: National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, 1200 New Jersey Avenue, S.E., West Building, Washington, DC 20590, Telephone: (888) 327-4236 Secondary Telephone: (800)424-9153 Web Site: http://www.nhtsa.dot.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent behavior, Child behavior, Families, Focus groups, Intervention, Interviews, Literature reviews, Motor vehicle injuries, Motor vehicle safety, Research, Seat belts

Carpenter CS, Stehr M. 2007. The effects of mandatory seatbelt laws on seatbelt use, motor vehicle fatalities, and crash-related injuries among youths. Cambridge, MA: National Bureau of Economic Research, 49 pp. (NBER working paper series no. 13408)

Annotation: This paper assesses the effects of mandatory seatbelt laws on self-reported seatbelt use, highway fatalities, and crash-related injuries among high-school-age adolescents using data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's national, state, and local Youth Risk Behavior Surveys and Fatality Analysis Reporting Systems from 1991 to 2005, a period spanning over 20 changes in seatbelt laws. The authors use quasi-experimental approaches that isolate the independent effects of seatbelt laws net of demographic characteristics, area and year fixed effects, and smooth area-specific trends. The paper, which includes an abstract, introduces the problem, discusses previous literature, provides a data description and research design, and offers results and a discussion and conclusion. Footnotes and a bibliography are included. Statistical data are presented in figures and tables grouped together at the end of the report.

Contact: National Bureau of Economic Research, 1050 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, MA 02138-5398, Telephone: (617) 868-3900 Fax: (617) 868-2742 E-mail: info@nber.org Web Site: http://www.nber.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent behavior, Adolescent morbidity, Adolescent mortality, High school students, Legislation, Motor vehicle crashes, Motor vehicle injuries, Motor vehicle safety, Research, Seat belts, Statistical data, Trends

Eaton DK, Kann L, Kinchen S, Ross J, Hawkins Harris, WA, Lowery R, McManus T, Chyen D, Shanklin S, Lim C, Grunbaum J, Wechsler H. 2006. Youth risk behavior surveillance: United States, 2005. MMWR Surveillance Summaries 55(SS-5):1-96,

Annotation: This report on youth risk behavior surveillance summarizes data from the 2005 national Youth Risk Behavior survey and trends during 1991-2005 in selected risk behaviors. Data from 40 state surveys and 21 local surveys are also included. The report describes the study methods, presents results, and offers a discussion and conclusion. Extensive tables and charts present statistical findings. References are included.

Keywords: AIDS, Adolescent health, Adolescent pregnancy, Adolescents, Alcohol, Behavior, Dietary practices, Drug use, HIV, Helmets, Injuries, Obesity, Physical activity, Physical education, Physical fighting, Prevention programs, Risk factors, Seat belts, Sexual behavior, Statistics, Suicide, Tobacco, Unintentional injuries, Weapons, Weight management

Levitt SD, Doyle JJ. 2006. Evaluating the effectiveness of child safety seats and seat belts in protecting children from injury. Cambridge, MA: National Bureau of Economic Research, 28 pp. (NBER working paper series no. 12519)

Annotation: This report is an economic analysis that tests the relative effectiivess of child safety seats, lap and shoulder seatbelts, and lap belts in preventing injuries among motor-vehicle passengers ages 2-6. The report, which includes an abstract, introduces the issue and discusses methods and data, summary statistics, and estimating the relative effects of child safety seats and seatbelts. Conclusions are offered, and references are included. Statistical information is presented in figures and tables.

Contact: National Bureau of Economic Research, 1050 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, MA 02138-5398, Telephone: (617) 868-3900 Fax: (617) 868-2742 E-mail: info@nber.org Web Site: http://www.nber.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Car seats, Child safety, Economics, Motor vehicle crashes, Seat belts, Young children

Partnership for Prevention. 2005. Health policy priorities. Washington, DC: Partnership for Prevention, 17 pp.

Annotation: This document contains a set of actions that are recommended to reduce chronic disease.. Actions include (1) enhance physical education in schools, (2) ensure access to clinical preventive services, (3) enhance access to places for physical activity, (4) increase access to healthier food options in communities, (5) implement smoke-free policies in public places and workplaces, (6) establish and enact primary safety belt laws, (7) promote healthy foods in schools, and (8) provide fluoridation of community water systems. For each action to document provides background, information about the burden of disease addressed by the action, evidence of effectiveness, and endnotes.

Contact: Partnership for Prevention, 1015 18th Street, N.W., Suite 300, Washington, DC 20036, Telephone: (202) 833-0009 Fax: (202) 833-0113 E-mail: info@prevent.org Web Site: http://www.prevent.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Fluorides, Food, Health, Health policy, Legislation, Physical activity, Physical education, Prevention services, Public policy, Schools, Seat belts, Smoking

Decina LE, Lococo KH. 2004. Misuse of child restraints. Washington, DC: National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, 55 pp.

Annotation: This report describes the result of a study to measure the current level of misuse of child restraint systems (CRS) among the general public, specifically on forms of misuse that can be expected to raise the risk of injury. Topics include a description of the workshop to identify CRS misuse measures, criteria for site survey selection, data collection, vehicle seating position of children (rear-facing versus forward-facing), use or misuse of child restraint equipment, state laws on child restraint use, and unrestrained children. Report sections include an introduction, details of the research methodology; the results and analysis, a summary and recommendations, and references. Appendices include a guidesheet on CRS correct use definitions, survey forms used, and a table providing socio-economic characteristics of state sites at the county-level.

Contact: National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, 1200 New Jersey Avenue, S.E., West Building, Washington, DC 20590, Telephone: (888) 327-4236 Secondary Telephone: (800)424-9153 Web Site: http://www.nhtsa.dot.gov Available from the website. Document Number: DOT HS 809 671.

Keywords: Injury prevention, Car seats, Child safety, Motor vehicle safety, Research, Seat belts, Statistics, Surveys

Grunbaum J, Kann L, Kinchen S, Ross J, Hawkins J, Lowery R, Harris WA, McManus T, Chyen D, Collins J. 2004. Youth risk behavior surveillance: United States, 2003. MMWR Surveillance Summaries 53(SS-2):1-96,

Annotation: This report summarizes data from the 2003 national school-based survey and trends during 1991-2003 in selected risk behaviors. Data from 32 state surveys, and 18 of local surveys were conducted during 2003. Survey categories include behaviors contributing to unintentional injuries and violence; tobacco use; alcohol and other drug use; age of initiation of risk behaviors; sexual behavior, unintended pregnancy, and sexual disease transmission; unhealthy diets; physical inactivity; and overwieght and weight control. Extensive tables and charts present statistical findings and references are included.

Contact: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 1600 Clifton Road, Atlanta, GA 30329-4027, Telephone: (800) 232-4636 Secondary Telephone: (888) 232-6348 E-mail: cdcinfo@cdc.gov Web Site: http://www.cdc.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: AIDS, Adolescent health, Adolescent pregnancy, Adolescents, Alcohol, Behavior, Dietary practices, Drug use, HIV, Helmets, Injuries, Obesity, Physical activity, Physical education, Physical fighting, Prevention programs, Risk factors, Seat belts, Sexual behavior, Suicide, Tobacco, Unintentional injuries, Weapons, Weight management

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. 2002. Youth risk behavior surveillance: United States, 2001. MMWR Surveillance Summaries 51(SS-4):1-64,

Annotation: This report summarizes data from a national survey, 34 state surveys, and 18 local surveys conducted among high school students on the topic of health risk behaviors. Survey categories include behaviors contributing to unintentional injuries and violence; tobacco use; alcohol and other drug use; sexual behavior, unintended pregnancy, and sexual disease transmission; unhealthy diets; and physical inactivity. Extensive tables and charts present statistical findings and references are included.

Contact: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 1600 Clifton Road, Atlanta, GA 30329-4027, Telephone: (800) 232-4636 Secondary Telephone: (888) 232-6348 E-mail: cdcinfo@cdc.gov Web Site: http://www.cdc.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: AIDS, Adolescent health, Adolescent pregnancy, Adolescents, Alcohol, Behavior, Dietary practices, Drug use, HIV, Helmets, Injuries, Physical activity, Physical education, Physical fighting, Prevention programs, Risk factors, Seat belts, Sexual behavior, Suicide, Tobacco, Unintentional injuries, Weapons, Weight management

Garcia VF. 2001. Increasing safety seat use among preschoolers. Cincinnati, OH: Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center, Department of Pediatric Surgery, 48 pp.

Annotation: This report describes an intervention program for parents of preschool children to increase parental awareness and knowledge of appropriate child restraint usage in automobiles. The program includes a curriculum for preschool children, and educational programs for parents as well as for teachers. Report contents include an abstract of the project; an introduction discussing the nature of the research problem; the purpose, scope, and methods of the investigation and the nature of the findings; an overview of the literature; study design and methods including the population studied, sample selection, instruments used, and statistical techniques employed; a presentation and discussion of the findings; and a list of products developed during the project. References conclude the report. Statistical information is provided in tables in the presentation of findings. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: Maternal and Child Health Library at Georgetown University, Box 571272, Washington, DC 20057-1272, Telephone: (202) 784-9770 E-mail: mchgroup@georgetown.edu Web Site: https://www.mchlibrary.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Car seats, Child safety, Curricula, Educational materials, Final reports, MCH research, Motor vehicle safety, Occupant restraints, Parent education, Preschool children, Safety programs, Seat belts, Young children

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. 1998. Youth risk behavior surveillance: United States, 1997. MMWR Surveillance Summaries 47(SS-3):1-92,

Annotation: This report summarizes data from a national survey, 33 state surveys, 3 territorial surveys, and 17 local surveys conducted among high school students from February through May 1997. Survey categories include behaviors contributing to unintentional injuries and violence; tobacco use; alcohol and other drug use; sexual behavior, unintended pregnancy, and sexual disease transmission; unhealthy diets; and physical inactivity. Extensive tables and charts present statistical findings and references are included.

Contact: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 1600 Clifton Road, Atlanta, GA 30329-4027, Telephone: (800) 232-4636 Secondary Telephone: (888) 232-6348 E-mail: cdcinfo@cdc.gov Web Site: http://www.cdc.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: AIDS, Adolescent health, Adolescent pregnancy, Adolescents, Alcohol, Behavior, Dietary practices, Drug use, HIV, Helmets, Injuries, Physical activity, Physical education, Physical fighting, Prevention programs, Risk factors, Seat belts, Sexual behavior, Suicide, Tobacco, Unintentional injuries, Weapons, Weight management

Moore J. 1991 (ca.). South Carolina Childhood Injury Reduction Project = Project Care: Childhood Accident Reduction Effort [Final report]. Columbia, SC: South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control, 36 pp.

Annotation: The purpose of the Childhood Injury Reduction Project (CHIRP) was to assume leadership in the development of a system by which data concerning fatal and nonfatal childhood injuries would be compiled, analyzed, reported, and ultimately used in the development of prevention strategies. The overall goal was to have a system in place by which childhood injury data were reported to a central agency by September 1991. Toward this goal, two impact objectives were developed: (1) A statewide surveillance system was to be established by September 1991 to provide a data base on childhood injury; and (2) a coalition of agencies and associations with interest in childhood injury was to be formed by September 1990 to focus on the problem and provide input into the development of the project. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Technical Information Service, U.S. Department of Commerce, 5301 Shawnee Road, Alexandria, VA 22312, Telephone: (703) 605-6050 Secondary Telephone: (888) 584-8332 E-mail: customerservice@ntis.gov Web Site: http://www.ntis.gov Document Number: NTIS PB93-145985.

Keywords: Accidents, Burns, Children, Data Collection, Information Systems, Injuries, Injury Prevention, Morbidity, Mortality, Poisons, Safety, Seat Belts/Restraints for Children

National Safe Kids Campaign. 1991. Safe kids buckle up: A child occupant protection strategy. Washington, DC: National Safe Kids Campaign, 190 pp.

Annotation: This manual was developed as a guide for implementing a community-based child occupant protection campaign. It incorporates the Campaign's approach in four areas of injury control: education, engineering, enactment and enforcement, and evaluation. It includes models for discount and loan programs. Numerous appendices include buying guides, survey forms, fact sheets, tips on keeping children happy as passengers, children with special needs, lists of laws, and a resource materials list.

Contact: Safe Kids Worldwide, 1301 Pennsylvania Avenue, N.W., Suite 1000, Washington, DC 20004-1707, Telephone: (202) 662-0600 Fax: (202) 393-2072 E-mail: info@safekids.org Web Site: http://www.safekids.org Price unknown.

Keywords: Car seats, Child safety, Children, Coalitions, Community programs, Consumer education, Data collection, Injury prevention, Legislation, Media campaigns, Occupants, Program development, Publicity, Resources for professionals, Safety, Seat belts, Special health care needs, Transportation injuries

U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Public Health Service, National Institutes of Health, Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism. Special report to the U.S. Congress on alcohol and health. Rockville, MD: National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, triennial.

Annotation: This report describes current progress in research on alcohol abuse and alcoholism. Topics covered include epidemiology, genetics and environment, neuroscience, medical consequences, fetal alcohol syndrome and other effects of alcohol on pregnancy outcome, adverse social consequences, diagnosis and assessment of alcohol use disorders, prevention, early and minimal intervention, and treatment.

Contact: National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, , 5635 Fishers Lane, MSC 9304, Bethesda, MD 20892-9304, Telephone: (301) 443-3860 Fax: (301) 780-1726 E-mail: NIAAAweb-r@exchange.nih.gov Web Site: http://www.niaaa.nih.gov Available in libraries; some editions available from the web. Document Number: DHHS (ADM) 87-1579 (6th), DHHS (ADM) 90-1656 (7th), DHHS (ADM) 281-91-0003 (8th).

Keywords: Adolescents, Adults, Age, Alaska natives, Alcohol use, American Indians, Attitudes, Blacks, Blood alcohol concentration, Brain injuries, Codes, College students, Community programs, Costs, Counseling, Crime, Demographics, Domestic violence, Drowning, Drug use, Education, Environment, Epidemiology, Ethnic groups, Fetal alcohol syndrome, Gender, Genetics, Hawaiians, Homeless persons, Industry, Injuries, Intervention, Legislation, Mortality, Motor vehicles, Motorcycles, Older adults, Pedestrians, Pregnant women, Prevention, Psychology, Questionnaires, Race, Railroads, Regulations, Seat belts, Social learning, Trauma

   

This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number U02MC31613, MCH Advanced Education Policy, $3.5 M. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.