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Strengthening the evidence for maternal and child health programs

Search Results: MCHLine

Items in this list may be obtained from the sources cited. Contact information reflects the most current data about the source that has been provided to the MCH Digital Library.


Displaying records 1 through 20 (87 total).

American College of Medical Genetics. n.d.. Hearing loss, genetics, and your child. Bethesda, MD: American College of Medical Genetics, 2 pp.

Annotation: This brochure provides information for parents of children with hearing loss. The brochure discusses genetics and hearing loss; insurance and paying for genetic testing; what parents should do once hearing loss has been diagnosed; why it is important for children with hearing loss to be seen by a geneticist; how to prepare for the genetics appointment; and what happens at the appointment.

Contact: American College of Medical Genetics, 7220 Wisconsin Avenue, N.W., Suite 300, Bethesda, MD 20814, Telephone: (301) 718-9603 Fax: (301) 718-9604 E-mail: acmg@acmg.net Web Site: http://www.acmg.net Available from the website.

Keywords: Children, Consumer education materials, Genes, Genetic disorders, Genetic screening, Genetic services, Genetics, Hearing disorders, Hearing screening, Hearing tests, Infants

National Center on Birth Defects and Developmental Disabilities, Early Hearing Detection and Intervention Program. n.d.. Hearing loss fact sheet. [Atlanta, GA: National Center on Birth Defects and Developmental Disabilities, Early Hearing Detection and Intervention Program], 1 p.

Annotation: This fact sheet for parents provides information about hearing loss in children. It explains what hearing loss in children is; discusses some signs of hearing loss, what causes it, and whether it can be prevented; and what parents can do it they suspect that their child has hearing loss. The fact sheet is printed in English on one side and in Spanish on the other.

Contact: National Center on Birth Defects and Developmental Disabilities, Early Hearing Detection and Intervention Program, 1600 Clifton Road, Mailstop E-88, Atlanta, GA 30333, Telephone: (404) 498-3032 Secondary Telephone: (800) 232-4636 Fax: (404) 498-3060 E-mail: ehdi@cdc.gov Web Site: http://www.cdc.gov/ncbddd/ehdi Available at no charge; also available from the website.

Keywords: Child development, Children, Consumer education materials, Early childhood development, Hearing disorders, Hearing screening, Hearing tests, Heath services, Infant development, Infants, Prevention, Spanish language materials

American Optometric Association. n.d.. Ready for school: Understanding the difference between vision screenings and vision examinations. St. Louis, MO: American Optometric Association, 2 pp.

Annotation: This fact sheet for parents provides information about the difference between vision screenings and vision examinations and explains why it is important for young children to receive comprehensive vision and eye examinations conducted by a doctor before they start school. The fact sheet explains the essential elements of a comprehensive eye examination used to ensure that learning is maximized through good vision.

Contact: American Optometric Association, 243 North Lindbergh Boulevard, First Floor , St. Louis, MO 63141, Telephone: (314) 991-4100 Secondary Telephone: (800) 365-2219 Fax: (314) 991-4101 Web Site: http://www.aoanet.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Child health, Consumer education materials, Eye diseases, Screening, Vision, Vision disorders, Vision screening, Vision tests, Young children

National Association of School Nurses and Association of State and Territorial Dental Directors. 2020. Considerations for school nurses in return to school: Dental screening. Silver Spring, MD: National Association of School Nurses, 4 pp.

Annotation: This report provides a summary of currently available resources that school nurses can consult as they consider when and whether to go back to school and, once back, whether to conduct oral health screenings. It provides background about tooth decay during childhood and about the impact of COVID-19 on the provision of oral health care. Also discussed are identification of children who need oral health care, communication, and infection-control measures.

Contact: National Association of School Nurses, 1100 Wayne Avenue, Suite 925, Silver Spring, MD 20910, Telephone: (240) 821-1130 Secondary Telephone: (866) 627-6767 Fax: (301) 585-1791 E-mail: nasn@nasn.org Web Site: http://www.nasn.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Disease transmission, Infectious diseases, Oral health, Prevention, School health, School nurses, Screening tests, Virus Diseases

Association of State and Territorial Dental Directors. 2020. School nurses: The key to good oral health during COVID-19. Reno, NV: Association of State and Territorial Dental Directors, 1 p.

Annotation: This infographic provides information to help school nurses ensure that children get the oral health care they need during COVID-19. It provides information about the problems that tooth decay in childhood cause and includes instructions on how to conduct verbal assessments and oral health screenings. Information about the person protective equipment required to safely conduct oral health screenings is included.

Contact: Association of State and Territorial Dental Directors, 3858 Cashill Boulevard, Reno, NV 89509, Telephone: (775) 626-5008 Fax: (775) 626-9268 E-mail: info@astdd.org Web Site: http://www.astdd.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Disease transmission, Infectious diseases, Oral health, Prevention, School health, School nurses, Screening tests, Virus diseases

National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. An evidence framework for genetic testing. Washington, DC: National Academies Press, 148 pp.

Annotation: This report presents findings on the evidence base for different types of genetic tests for patient management and provides recommendations to advance the development of an adequate evidence base for genetic tests to improve patient care and treatment. Contents include information about the uses of genetic testing; ethical, legal, and social implications; assessment of genetic tests; evidence; and recommendations for research and a framework for decision making related to the use of genetic tests in clinical care.

Contact: National Academies Press, 500 Fifth Street, N.W., Keck 360, Washington, DC 20001, Telephone: (202) 334-3313 Secondary Telephone: (888) 624-8373 Fax: (202) 334-2451 E-mail: customer_service@nap.edu Web Site: http://www.nap.edu Available from the website.

Keywords: Decision making, Disease management, Evaluation methods, Genetic screening, Models, Outcome and process assessment, Patient care, Policy development, Research, Screening tests

Hitti JE, Melvin AJ, Taylor P, Rhodes W, eds. 2016. Screening and management of maternal HIV infection: Implications for mother and infant (rev. ed.). Seattle, WA: University of Washington, Northwest Regional Perinatal Program and Department of Pediatrics; Olympia, WA: Washington State Department of Health, 40 pp.

Annotation: This handbook describes best practices to help with the continuing effort to prevent HIV infection in women and infants. Topics include HIV counseling and testing during pregnancy; perinatal transmission risk; diagnostic tests; Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's classification of disease; HIV reporting requirements; medications and treatment during pregnancy, labor, delivery and postpartum; newborn treatment; and consultation and referral information. Four appendices provide a resource directory, a listing of local health jurisdictions in Washington state, free regional and national telephone consultation resources, and Web sites. References conclude the handbook.

Contact: Washington State Department of Health, P.O. Box 47890, Olympia, WA 98504-7890, Telephone: (800) 525-0127 Secondary Telephone: (360) 236-4030 Web Site: http://www.doh.wa.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Childbirth, Consultation, Counseling, Diagnostic tests, HIV, HIV screening, Labor, Medicine, Newborns, Perinatal care, Postpartum care, Pregnancy, Pregnant women, Referral, Resource materials, Women's health

U.S. Preventive Services Task Force. 2015. Speech and language delay and disorders in children age 5 and younger: Screening. [Rockville, MD]: U.S. Preventive Services Task Force, multiple items.

National Diabetes Education Program. 2014. Did you have gestational diabetes when you were pregnant? What you need to know [rev. ed.]. [Bethesda, MD]: National Diabetes Educational Program, 2 pp.

Annotation: This fact sheet for consumers provides information about gestational diabetes and about what women who had this condition while pregnant can do to reduce the chances that they or their child will get diabetes later in life. The fact sheet provides action steps for women (including getting tested for diabetes, eating healthy foods and being more active) and for the whole family.

Contact: National Diabetes Education Program, One Diabetes Way, Bethesda, MD 20841-9692, Telephone: (301) 496-3583 Web Site: http://ndep.nih.gov Available from the website. Document Number: NIH Publication No. 12-6019; NDEP-88.

Keywords: Breastfeeding, Child health, Consumer education materials, Diabetes mellitus, Families, Gestational diabetes, Nutrition, Obesity, Physical activity, Pregnancy, Prevention, Screening tests, Women's health

National Center for Medical Home Implementation, National Center for Children's Vision and Eye Health. [2013]. The role of the medical home in vision and eye health: A fact sheet for medical professionals. [Elk Grove Village, IL]: National Center for Medical Home Implementation, 2 pp.

Annotation: This fact sheet for health professional provides information about the role the medical home plays in ensuring that children receive timely eye examinations; vision screenings; and, when necessary, eye examinations and treatment for vision conditions. The fact sheet discusses common eye problems in preschool-age children, the importance of educating families about vision milestones, guidelines for vision screening, and benefits of early vision screening and eye examinations in the medical home. Links to resources for more information are provided. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: Prevent Blindness America, 211 West Wacker Drive, Suite 1700, Chicago, IL 60606, Telephone: (800) 331-2020 E-mail: info@preventblindness.org Web Site: http://www.preventblindness.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Eye diseases, Families, Medical home, Resource materials, Treatment, Vision, Vision disorders, Vision screening, Vision tests, Young children

Association of Public Health Laboratories. (2013). Newborn screening: Four facts policymakers need to know. Silver Spring, MD: Association of Public Health Laboratories, 14 pp.

Annotation: This bochure describes the importance of newborn screening in the early detection of heritable and genetic conditions that may otherwise be hidden in infancy or early childhood. It outlines the history of newborn screening in the United States in the past 50 years, the importance of blood-spot samples from every newborn being screened by a laboratory, the public health success of newborn screening, the economic benefits of early detection of conditions, the success of pre-discharge hearing and heart screening, and the importance of evolving and improving newborn screening. The brochure contains tables describing the most common disorders screened for and partners in the screening process. It also provides several vignettes of people who were diagnosed with various conditions and were able to lead healthy lives because their conditions could be treated if diagnosed early.

Contact: Association of Public Health Laboratories, 8515 Georgia Avenue, Suite 700 , Silver Spring, MD 20910, Telephone: (240) 485-2745 Secondary Telephone: (240) 485-2747 Fax: (240) 485-2700 E-mail: scott.becker@aphl.org Web Site: http://www.aphl.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Blood tests, Genetic screening, Hearing tests, Neonatal screening, Newborn infants, Screening tests

Association of Public Health Laboratories. (2013). What's the best thing you can do to protect your newborn's health?: Newborn screening, 50 years - saving babies' lives. Silver Spring, MD: Association of Public Health Laboratories, 2 pp.

Annotation: This brochure explains the importance of newborn screening for new parents. It discusses national and state testing practices so that parents will know early about potential life threatening illnesses or disabilities to their baby.

Contact: Association of Public Health Laboratories, 8515 Georgia Avenue, Suite 700 , Silver Spring, MD 20910, Telephone: (240) 485-2745 Secondary Telephone: (240) 485-2747 Fax: (240) 485-2700 E-mail: scott.becker@aphl.org Web Site: http://www.aphl.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Consumer education materials, Neonatal screening, Newborn infants, Screening tests

Taylor P, Bailey D, Green SR, McCully C, eds. 2012. Substance abuse during pregnancy: Guidelines for screening (rev. ed.). Olympia, WA: Washington State Department of Health, Maternal and Child Health, 50 pp.

Annotation: This booklet describes the role of health professionals in screening and identifying pregnant women with substance abuse issues. Contents include guidelines for screening and follow-up, sample screening tools, recommendations related to drug testing of pregnant women and newborns, and referral resources. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: Health Education Resource Exchange, Washington State Department of Health, P.O. Box 47833, Olympia, WA 98504-7833, Telephone: (360) 236-3736 Fax: (360) 664-4500 E-mail: here@doh.wa.gov Web Site: http://here.doh.wa.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Guidelines, Newborns, Pregnant women, Screening, Substance abuse, Substance abuse treatment services, Tests

California Health Benefits Review Program. 2012. Policy brief: Pediatric dental and pediatric vision essential health benefits. Oakland, CA: California Health Benefits Review Program, 11 pp.

Annotation: This brief focuses on a subset of the health insurance market that is subject to essential health benefit (EHB) coverage requirements in California, nongrandfathered small-group and individual-market health service plans, and policies regulated by the California Department of Managed Care and the California Department of Insurance. Topics include tests, treatments, and services covered in the pediatric dental and pediatric vision EHB category; the age group eligible for pediatric dental coverage; and how stand-alone health insurance will be coordinated with stand-alone dental insurance to fulfill the pediatric EHB requirement.

Contact: California Health Benefits Review Program, University of California, Office of the President, 111 Franklin Street, 11th Floor, Oakland, CA 94607, Telephone: (510) 287-3876 E-mail: info@chbrp.org Web Site: http://www.chbrp.org Available from the website.

Keywords: California, Children, Dental care, Health insurance, Medicaid, Oral health, State programs, Vision screening, Vision tests

National Center on Birth Defects and Developmental Disabilities, Division of Blood Disorders. [2011]. What you should know about sickle cell trait. Atlanta, GA: National Center on Birth Defects and Developmental Disabilities, Division of Blood Disorders, 2 pp.

Annotation: This fact sheet provides answers to frequently asked questions about sickle cell trait. It explains the differences between sickle cell trait and sickle cell disease; explains how someone acquires the trait and who is affected by it; explains the health complications that may result from having the trait; and describes the blood test that can determine whether or not someone has the trait. The fact sheet also provides statistics on the chances that a baby will acquire sickle cell trait, based on whether or not one or both parents have either the trait or the disease.

Contact: National Center on Birth Defects and Developmental Disabilities, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 1600 Clifton Road, Atlanta, GA 30329-4027, Telephone: (800) 232-4636 Secondary Telephone: (888) 232-6348 E-mail: cdcinfo@cdc.gov Web Site: http://www.cdc.gov/ncbddd Available from the website.

Keywords: Blood and lymphatic diseases, Consumer education materials, Screening tests, Sickle cell disease, Sickle cell trait

Minnesota Department of Health. [2011]. Developmental and social-emotional screening of young children (0-6 years of age) in Minnesosta. St. Paul, MN: Minnesota Department of Health,

Annotation: This website provides an overview of developmental and mental health screening of children (ages 0 through 6) in the state of Minnesota; online access to screening instruments and state requirements; and a training module for clinics and health care providers. The site describes the review process for screening tools used in Minnesota's public programs; provides answers to frequently asked questions; and offers additional training resources such as web training videos and power point presentations. Links to related information produced by the Minnesota Department of Health are provided as well.

Contact: Minnesota Department of Health, P.O. Box 64975, St. Paul, MN 55164-0975, Telephone: (651) 201-5000 Secondary Telephone: (888) 345-0823 Web Site: http://www.health.state.mn.us Available from the website.

Keywords: Developmental screening, Minnesota, Public health services, Screening, Screening tests, State programs, Training materials, Young children

Genetic Alliance. [2011]. Baby's first test. [Washington, DC]: Genetic Alliance,

Annotation: This website provides information on newborn screening primarily for expecting and new parents. Resources are also available for prenatal and pediatric health professionals, including information about dried blood spot storage and usage. The content is based on 2008 legislation (the Newborn Screening Saves Lives Act) to expand support, research, and education opportunities for newborn screening. The website is organized as follows: About Newborn Screening (newborn screening facts, genetic and family history, screening resources, conditions screened by state); What to Expect (before birth, testing procedure, responding to results, testing outcomes, and what happens to the blood sample); Find a Condition; and Living with Conditions (family experiences, talking about a diagnosis, advocacy and support groups, finding a specialist, insurance and planning, looking to the future). [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: Genetic Alliance, 4301 Connecticut Avenue, N.W., Suite 404, Washington, DC 20008-2369, Telephone: (202) 966-5557 Secondary Telephone: (800) 336-GENE Fax: (202) 966-8553 E-mail: info@geneticalliance.org Web Site: http://www.geneticalliance.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Blood tests, Educational materials, Family support, Genetic services, Newborn infants, Resources for professionals, Screening, Special health care needs

U.S. Preventive Services Task Force. 2011-. Visual impairment in children ages 1 to 5 years: Screening. Rockville, MD: U.S. Preventive Services Task Force, multiple items.

Wisconsin Association for Perinatal Care, Prenatal Testing Committee. 2011. Laboratory testing during pregnancy: Recommendations of the WAPC Prenatal Testing Committee (4th ed.). Madison, WI: Wisconsin Association for Perinatal Care, 54 pp.

Annotation: This report, which is geared toward clinicians, offers recommendations on specific laboratory tests that should be considered during the course of prenatal care and describes the circumstances under which the tests should be performed. The report also provides detailed information about a wide range of prenatal screens and tests.

Contact: Wisconsin Association for Perinatal Care, McConnell Hall, 1010 Mound Street, Madison, WI 53715, Telephone: (608) 417-6060 Fax: 608/267-6089 E-mail: wapc@perinatalweb.org Web Site: http://www.perinatalweb.org/ Available from the website.

Keywords: Prenatal care, Prenatal screening, Screening tests, Wisconsin

Wisconsin Newborn Screening Laboratory. 2011. Health professional's guide to newborn screening. Madison, WI: Wisconsin Newborn Screening Laboratory, 29 pp.

Annotation: This guide provides information to help health professionals in the state of Wisconsin comply with state requirements regarding the screening of infants for congenital or metabolic disorders and to better understand the Wisconsin Newborn Screening Program. The guide presents step-by-step guidelines on testing (including blood collection, specimen handling, and laboratory testing) and lists and describes the various newborn screening disorders (including symptoms and treatment). It explains how Wisconsin's screening program is funded; lists contact information for treatment centers; and provides the text of the state of Wisconsin's newborn screening statute.

Contact: Wisconsin Newborn Screening Laboratory, University of Wisconsin at Madison, 465 Henry Mall, Madison, WI 53706, Telephone: (608) 262-1293 Fax: (608) 262-3257 Web Site: http://www.slh.wisc.edu Available from the website.

Keywords: Blood tests, Disorders, Infant health, Neonatal screening, Newborn infants, State legislation, State programs, Wisconsin

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This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number U02MC31613, MCH Advanced Education Policy, $3.5 M. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.