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Strengthening the evidence for maternal and child health programs

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Items in this list may be obtained from the sources cited. Contact information reflects the most current data about the source that has been provided to the MCH Digital Library.


Displaying records 1 through 20 (21 total).

U.S. Food and Nutrition Service. 2019. A guide to smart snacks in school for school year 2019-2020. Alexandria, VA: U.S. Food and Nutrition Service, 14 pp.

Annotation: This report provides information for schools about U.S. Department of Agriculture Smart Snacks in School standards and how to comply with them. The report explains why Smart Snacks are important, which foods and beverage need to meet the standards, and how schools can tell if they are complying with the standards. The report also provides information about how to check whether specific foods and beverages meet the standards and how the standards affect school fundraisers.

Contact: U.S. Food and Nutrition Service, 3101 Park Center Drive, Alexandria, VA 22302, Web Site: http://www.fns.usda.gov/fns Available from the website.

Keywords: Nutrition, School health, School-age children, Adolescents, Snacks, Standards

Holt K, Barzel R. 2013. Oral health and learning: When children's oral health suffers, so does their ability to learn (3rd ed.). Washington, DC: National Maternal and Child Oral Health Resource Center, 4 pp.

Annotation: This fact sheet presents information on the effects of poor oral health on learning in school-age children. Topics include the impact of poor oral health on school performance and social relationships, nutrition and learning, school attendance and learning, and programs for improving oral health. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Maternal and Child Oral Health Resource Center, Telephone: (202) 784-9771 E-mail: OHRCinfo@georgetown.edu Web Site: https://www.mchoralhealth.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Academic achievement, Child health programs, Learning, Nutrition, Oral health, School attendance, School-age children, Social interaction

American Academy of Pediatrics, American Public Health Association, and National Resource Center for Health and Safety in Child Care and Early Education. 2012. Preventing childhood obesity in early care and education programs: Selected standards from Caring for Our Children: National Health and Safety Performance Standards, 3rd edition (2nd ed.). Aurora, CO: National Resource Center for Health and Safety in Child Care and Early Education, 77 pp.

Annotation: This set of national standards describe evidence-based best practices in nutrition, physical activity, and screen time for early care and education programs. Contents include intervention strategies to prevent excessive weight gain in young children. The standards detail opportunities for facilities to work with families. Topics include nutrition requirements for infants, toddlers and preschoolers, and school-age children; meal service and supervision; food brought from home; nutrition education; food and nutrition service policies and plans; infant feeding policy; active opportunities for physical activity; playing outdoors; protection from air pollution while children are outside; caregivers/teachers' encouragement of physical activity; policies and practices that promote physical activity; and limiting media and computer time. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Resource Center for Health and Safety in Child Care and Early Education, University of Colorado Denver, 13120 East 19th Avenue, Mail Stop F541, P.O. Box 6511, Aurora, CO 80045, Telephone: (800) 598-5437 (598-KIDS) Fax: (303) 724-0960 E-mail: info@nrckids.org Web Site: http://nrckids.org $30 plus shipping and handling; available from the website at no charge. Document Number: ISBN 978-58110-714-2.

Keywords: Child care, Early childhood education, Infants, National initiatives, Nutrition, Obesity, Physical activity, Policy development, Preschool children, Primary prevention, Program development, School-age children, Standards, Toddlers

Cooper R, Levin M. 2009. School breakfast scorecard: School year 2008-2009. Washington, DC: Food Research and Action Center, 20 pp.

Annotation: This report analyzes school breakfast participation for the 2008-2009 school year. The report provides information about who is eligible for the federal School Breakfast Program, discusses findings of the study, discusses child nutrition reauthorization, and provides school meals legislation by state as well as other state-by-state information.

Contact: Food Research and Action Center, 1875 Connecticut Avenue, N.W., Suite 540, Washington, DC 20009, Telephone: (202) 986-2200 Fax: (202) 986-2525 Web Site: http://www.frac.org/ Available from the website.

Keywords: Children, Costs, Eligibility, Federal programs, Legislation, Low income groups, Nutrition, School breakfast programs, School-age children, State programs

Finke J, Plonski-Fuqua B, Hartley B, Hargrave AF, Tasev D, Tumolo C, Vargas PA. 2009. Asthma guidelines for schools. Arizona Asthma Coalition in cooperation with the Arizona Department of Education and Arizona Department of Health Services, 22 pp.

Annotation: These guidelines provide information to help school administrators, school health personnel, teachers, and support staff understand how to monitor asthma control in the school setting and how to help identify students with poorly controlled asthma so that parents can be encouraged to follow-up with the student’s health care provider. Included are District-level policy and procedure recommendations for asthma management; a lists of responsibilities for school personnel; students; and families; age-specific information on asthma control; Arizona statutes related to medical treatment in school settings; and individual treatment plans for students with asthma.

Contact: Arizona Asthma Coalition, 5804 N. Echo Canyon Lane, Phoenix, AZ 85018, E-mail: JHarris@azasthma.org Web Site: http://www.azasthma.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Arizona, Asthma, Health education, Monitoring, School health, School-aged children, State initiatives, Treatment

National Scientific Council on the Developing Child. 2007. The timing and quality of early experiences combine to shape brain architecture. Cambridge, MA: National Scientific Council on the Developing Child, 9 pp. (Working paper no. 5)

Annotation: This paper discusses the establishment of brain architecture early in life and the importance of taking advantage of early opportunities in the developmental building process. The paper presents the issue and discusses what science tells us and popular misrepresentations of science, the science-policy gap, and implications for policy and programs.

Contact: National Scientific Council on the Developing Child, Harvard University, 50 Church Street, Fourth Floor, Cambridge, MA 02138, Telephone: (617) 496-0578 E-mail: info@developingchild.net Web Site: http://www.developingchild.net Available from the website.

Keywords: , Brain, Early childhood development, Early childhood education, Early intervention, Early intervention programs, High risk children, Prevention, Programs, Public policy, School readiness, School-age children, Young children

American Society of Human Genetics. 2004. Enhancement of K-12 human genetics education: Creating a cooperative plan. [Bethesda, MD]: American Society of Human Genetics, 16 pp.

Annotation: This report provides information about a meeting convened in Bethesda, Maryland, on September 9-10, 2004, in recognition of the need to develop a cooperative plan to enhance human genetics education in classrooms, disseminate information, and generate interest among students in careers in human genetics and related fields. The report discusses differing perspectives on human genetics and genetics community resources. A brief summary of the meeting discussion is included, along with a table outlining what geneticists can do for students in different grades.

Contact: American Society of Human Genetics, 9650 Rockville Pike, Bethesda, MD 20814, Telephone: (301) 634-7300 Secondary Telephone: (866) HUM-GENE Fax: (301) 634-7079 Web Site: http://www.ashg.org/ Available from the website.

Keywords: Careers, Elementary school, Geneticists, Genetics education, High school students, Middle school, School-age children

National Scientific Council on the Developing Child. 2004. Young children develop in an enviroment of relationships. Cambridge, MA: National Scientific Council on the Developing Child, 12 pp. (Working paper no. 1)

Annotation: This paper discusses the relationship between healthy development and the reliability of a young child's relationships with the important people in his or her life, both within and outside the family. The paper presents the issue and discusses what science tells us, unfounded assertions in the name of science, the science-policy gap, and implications for policy and programs.

Contact: National Scientific Council on the Developing Child, Harvard University, 50 Church Street, Fourth Floor, Cambridge, MA 02138, Telephone: (617) 496-0578 E-mail: info@developingchild.net Web Site: http://www.developingchild.net Available from the website.

Keywords: Child care, Early childhood development, Early childhood education, Fathers, Mental health, Mothers, Parent child relations, Parental leave, Programs, Public policy, Relationships, School readiness, School-age children, Young children

Telleen S. 2001. Use of Child Health Services by Hispanic Families: [Final report]. Chicago, IL: University of Illinois at Chicago, 59 pp.

Annotation: This study examined the influence of social context and acculturation on use of health services for preschool Mexican-American and Puerto Rican children in a major Midwestern city. Questions about health practices and service utilization were based on "Healthy People 2000" objectives for Hispanic children, including improving nutrition and reducing asthma morbidity; dental caries; high lead levels; and injuries/deaths from firearms, child abuse, motor vehicle crashes, and residential fires. The influence of health service availability, provider outreach, and mediating variables (e.g., knowledge of health services/practices, parental beliefs/attitudes, sense of control over their children's health) were examined. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Technical Information Service, U.S. Department of Commerce, 5301 Shawnee Road, Alexandria, VA 22312, Telephone: (703) 605-6050 Secondary Telephone: (888) 584-8332 E-mail: customerservice@ntis.gov Web Site: http://www.ntis.gov Document Number: NTIS PB2001-106924.

Keywords: Access to Health, Care, Cultural Sensitivity, Hispanics, Hispanics–Mexican Americans, Hispanics–Puerto Ricans, MCH Research, Parents, Puerto Ricans, Research, School-age children

Alarcon O. 2000. Social Context of Puerto Rican Child Health and Growth: [Final report]. Wellesley, MA: Wellesley College, 60 pp.

Annotation: The specific aims of this study were to: (1) Describe the life patterns of children of Puerto Rican origin living on the U.S. mainland, taking into consideration variations in socioeconomic status (SES), gender, and color; (2) describe Puerto Rican children's experiences with migration and the impact of migration on the interconnected contexts of their family, peer groups, school, neighborhood, and ethnic community, as well as the majority culture; and (3) examine the relationships between migration, social contexts, and Puerto Rican children's development, both cross-sectionally and longitudinally. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Technical Information Service, U.S. Department of Commerce, 5301 Shawnee Road, Alexandria, VA 22312, Telephone: (703) 605-6050 Secondary Telephone: (888) 584-8332 E-mail: customerservice@ntis.gov Web Site: http://www.ntis.gov Document Number: NTIS PB2000-106925.

Keywords: Data Collection, Hispanics–Puerto Ricans, MCH Research, Minority Groups, Parents, Puerto Ricans, Research, School-age children

Ireys H. 2000. Preventing Mental Health Problems in Ill Children: [Final report]. Baltimore, MD: Johns Hopkins University, 87 pp.

Annotation: More than two decades of epidemiological and clinic-based studies indicate that children with disabilities and chronic illnesses and their mothers are at high risk for secondary mental health problems. Despite this extensive body of work, few community-based interventions have been developed to reduce the risk of poor mental health outcomes, and few have been evaluated comprehensively. The goal of this study was to implement and evaluate a 15-month parent-professional intervention designed to reduce the risk of poor mental health outcomes for children with chronic illnesses and their parents. This study aimed to (1) assess the intervention's success in reaching specific objectives, (2) assess the intervention's impact on participants' mental health, and (3) document which children and parents benefit most from the intervention. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Technical Information Service, U.S. Department of Commerce, 5301 Shawnee Road, Alexandria, VA 22312, Telephone: (703) 605-6050 Secondary Telephone: (888) 584-8332 E-mail: customerservice@ntis.gov Web Site: http://www.ntis.gov Document Number: NTIS PB2001-101687.

Keywords: Children with Special Health care Needs, Chronic Illnesses and Disabilities, MCH Research, Mental Health, Parent Support Services, Parents, Parents, Research, School-age children, Self Esteem

Charnov DJ, Rutsch C. 2000. Making a difference: A parent's guide to advocacy and community action. Washington, DC: Children's Resources Inernational, 102 pp.

Annotation: This book provides parents and others with the skills to organize effectively and speak out on issues that affect children at home, at school, and in the broader community. Topics include (1) why taking action is important, (2) getting started, (3) reaching out and involving others, (4) forming action groups, (5) using action groups to take action, (6) sustaining momentum and celebrating success, and (7) real-life examples of advocates in action.

Contact: Children's Resources International, 2801 New Mexico Avenue, N.W., Suite 1020, Washington, DC 20007, E-mail: pcoughlin@childrensresources.org Available in libraries. Document Number: ISBN 1-889544-13-2.

Keywords: Advocacy, Child health, Children, Communities, Education, Families, Safety, School-age children

Bassuk E. 1999. Homeless Mothers and Children: Longitudinal Study: [Final report]. Newton, MA: Harvard University Medical School, 8 pp.

Annotation: While causes of homelessness can be traced, much is unknown about the course of homelessness over time. By following a sample of homeless and housed families for 24 months and collecting additional data, the study team: (1) Examined the course of homelessness among families and the extent to which it is chronic or episodic; (2) compared factors that increase the risk of homelessness with those that prolong it; (3) examined mediating factors, especially social supports; (4) described the consequences of homelessness for women; and (5) examined the consequences of homelessness, other risk factors, and protective factors on the development, adaptation, and achievement of children. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Technical Information Service, U.S. Department of Commerce, 5301 Shawnee Road, Alexandria, VA 22312, Telephone: (703) 605-6050 Secondary Telephone: (888) 584-8332 E-mail: customerservice@ntis.gov Web Site: http://www.ntis.gov Document Number: NTIS PB99-158040.

Keywords: Adolescents (not pregnancy related), Families, Homeless Persons, Infants, MCH Research, Mental Health, Nonpregnant women (not otherwise identified as adolescents), Parents, Pregnant women (not otherwise defined as adolescents), Preschool children, Psychosocial Factors, Research, School-age children, Toddlers

Black M. 1999. Growth and Development: Longitudinal Followup: [Final report]. Baltimore, MD: University of Maryland Medical School, 34 pp.

Annotation: This project was designed to evaluate the long-term effects of home intervention on the health, growth, and development of low-income, inner-city children diagnosed with nonorganic failure to thrive (NOFTT). The longitudinal study built on an ongoing randomized clinical trial of home intervention. The study followed the intervention children and their matched controls through their preschool years until they reached first grade. Approximately 90 percent of the children were from African-American families and most of the families were headed by single mothers who had not completed high school. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Technical Information Service, U.S. Department of Commerce, 5301 Shawnee Road, Alexandria, VA 22312, Telephone: (703) 605-6050 Secondary Telephone: (888) 584-8332 E-mail: customerservice@ntis.gov Web Site: http://www.ntis.gov Document Number: NTIS PB2000-106933.

Keywords: Blacks, Failure to Thrive, Home Health Services, Home Visiting Programs, Home Visiting Services, Low Income Population, MCH Research, Preschool children, Research, School-age children, Urban Population

Michals K. 1993. An Educational Behavioral Program for PKU [Final report]. Chicago, IL: University of Illinois at Chicago, 47 pp.

Annotation: Long-term dietary treatment of patients with phenylketonuria (PKU) is essential for optimal development and maintenance of intellectual ability. Children should be educated and adequately prepared to assume self-management of their treatment as they undergo physiological and psychosocial maturation. This study examined the effects of an experimental program that uses both an educational and a behavioral approach to accomplish dietary self-management by child and adolescent phenylketonuria patients. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Technical Information Service, U.S. Department of Commerce, 5301 Shawnee Road, Alexandria, VA 22312, Telephone: (703) 605-6050 Secondary Telephone: (888) 584-8332 E-mail: customerservice@ntis.gov Web Site: http://www.ntis.gov Document Number: NTIS PB95-209516.

Keywords: Adolescents, Adolescents, Children with Special Health care Needs, Chronic Illnesses and Disabilities, Chronically Ill, MCH Research, Metabolic Disorders, Nutrition, Patient Education, Phenylketonuria, School Age Children, School-Age Children

Simons R. 1992. Nature, Origins, and Consequences of Conceptions of Parenting [Final report]. Ames, IA: Iowa State University, 52 pp.

Annotation: This study investigated the nature, origins, and consequences of adult and adolescent views of the role of the parent (conceptions of parenting). Specifically, the study sought to: (1) Develop a causal model of the determinants of parental behavior, with parenting beliefs constituting a component of the model; and (2) develop and test hypotheses on how parenting beliefs are learned. This portion of the study examined the extent to which beliefs about parenting are transmitted across generations. The findings indicated that determinants of parenting practices include degree of satisfaction with the parent-child relationship and the type of parenting the mother and father received as children. The study also found evidence to support the contention that socialization of parenting beliefs differs by gender of the child. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Technical Information Service, U.S. Department of Commerce, 5301 Shawnee Road, Alexandria, VA 22312, Telephone: (703) 605-6050 Secondary Telephone: (888) 584-8332 E-mail: customerservice@ntis.gov Web Site: http://www.ntis.gov Document Number: NTIS PB93-180206.

Keywords: Adolescents, Parent-child interaction, Parenting attitudes, Parents, School-age children, Siblings

Perrin J. 1992. Stress, Bleeding, and Functional Status in Hemophilia [Final report]. Boston, MA: Massachusetts General Hospital, 45 pp.

Annotation: This study had four aims to: (1) Describe the patterns of bleeding in a sample of children and adolescents with hemophilia; (2) examine the relationship of stress as perceived by children or parents and the frequency of bleeding; (3) determine the rate of psychological problems among boys with hemophilia and examine the characteristics that affect that risk; (4) determine the impact of bleeding on the functioning of children and adolescents with hemophilia. Approximately 100 school age children with hemophilia were studied for a period of 6 months. The study found high rates of bleeding associated with trauma. It also found that the impact of stress in increasing the likelihood of bleeding is clinically relatively small, suggesting that the impact of improved stress management will also be small. The study showed a high rate of psychological problems among children with hemophilia. It also demonstrated a strong link between maternal self-esteem and the psychological functioning of the child. In addition, types of parenting were associated with different levels of social competence. These findings suggest psychological and social functioning of children with hemophilia may be improved through work with parents rather than directly with children. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Technical Information Service, U.S. Department of Commerce, 5301 Shawnee Road, Alexandria, VA 22312, Telephone: (703) 605-6050 Secondary Telephone: (888) 584-8332 E-mail: customerservice@ntis.gov Web Site: http://www.ntis.gov Document Number: NTIS PB93-180008.

Keywords: Chronically ill, Coping skills, Hemophilia, Parents, School-age children, Self-esteem, Stress

McKay C. 1990 (ca.). Minnesota Childhood Injury Prevention Project [Final report]. Minneapolis, MN: Minnesota Department of Health, 10 pp.

Annotation: This project expanded childhood injury surveillance efforts and childhood injury prevention activities within local community health services. Project activities included compiling data on childhood-specific injury morbidity and mortality, creating a coalition of agencies with an interest in childhood injuries, providing assistance in developing local prevention programs, developing a comprehensive approach to reduce scald injuries in children ages birth to five years, and making long-range plans to address other types of injuries and other age groups. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Technical Information Service, U.S. Department of Commerce, 5301 Shawnee Road, Alexandria, VA 22312, Telephone: (703) 605-6050 Secondary Telephone: (888) 584-8332 E-mail: customerservice@ntis.gov Web Site: http://www.ntis.gov Document Number: NTIS PB93-146009.

Keywords: Adolescents, American Academy of Pediatrics, Burns, Centers for Disease Control (CDC), Child, Data Collection, Education of Health Professionals, Emergency Medical Services, Injury Prevention Injuries, Morbidity, Mortality, Preschoolers, Rural Population, Scalds, School-Age Children

Holaday B. 1990. A Survey of Chronically Ill Children's Use of Time Out of School [Final report]. San Francisco, CA: University of California, San Francisco, 132 pp.

Annotation: The primary aim of this study was to describe and analyze the everyday out-of-school life experiences of chronically ill school-age children, and to examine the effects of different ecological contexts on the child's out-of-school life. To accomplish this aim, we focused on the ways in which chronically ill children use their out-of-school time. The use of time is a proxy—an indicator of what matters to children and to their parents. Based on the analysis of data from a pilot study, two general hypotheses were developed: (1) The patterns of chronically ill children's time use depend on the extent to and the manner in which parents and others engage in joint activities with them; and (2) the capacity of the parents to engage in such joint behavior depends on the extent to which there exist external support systems that provide opportunity, assistance, resources, and channels of communication. A cross-sectional survey design was used to collect data at one point in time from a sample of 365 chronically ill school-age children and their parents. We examined time use in five areas: Children's activities on their own (alone or with friends); children's activities with their parents; children's in-home and out-of-home chores, jobs, and responsibilities; children's participation in organized activities; and television viewing. These were activities that would be meaningful to children from a wide range of backgrounds, and represent different aspects of daily life for a school-age child. Children were selected with a variety of chronic illnesses. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Technical Information Service, U.S. Department of Commerce, 5301 Shawnee Road, Alexandria, VA 22312, Telephone: (703) 605-6050 Secondary Telephone: (888) 584-8332 E-mail: customerservice@ntis.gov Web Site: http://www.ntis.gov Document Number: NTIS PB92-136233.

Keywords: After School Activities, Chronically Ill, Parents, School-Age Children

Capute A. 1987. Neurodevelopmental Precursors of Learning Disability [Final report]. Baltimore, MD: John F. Kennedy Institute for Handicapped Children,

Annotation: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the predictive validity (and clinical utility) of selected aspects of infant development in relationship to later specific learning disability. The study sought to determine whether the neurodevelopmental substrate for learning disorders could be detected prior to academic underachievement. 240 children participated in the study. The findings of the study supported the original premise: Early deviations in the pattern of development are associated with developmental dysfunctions in other areas. Such deviations are detectable by techniques that can be employed in the course of well-child care. If replicated, the data give primary care providers a means of placing infants "at risk" for learning dysfunction that is based on performance instead of history. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Technical Information Service, U.S. Department of Commerce, 5301 Shawnee Road, Alexandria, VA 22312, Telephone: (703) 605-6050 Secondary Telephone: (888) 584-8332 E-mail: customerservice@ntis.gov Web Site: http://www.ntis.gov Document Number: NTIS PB88-173828.

Keywords: Learning disabilities, Nervous system diseases, Preschool children, School-age children, Specific learning disability (SLD)

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This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number U02MC31613, MCH Advanced Education Policy, $3.5 M. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.