Skip Navigation

Strengthening the evidence for maternal and child health programs

Search Results: MCHLine

Items in this list may be obtained from the sources cited. Contact information reflects the most current data about the source that has been provided to the MCH Digital Library.


Displaying records 1 through 20 (68 total).

Michigan State Board of Education. 2016. State Board of Education statement and guidance on safe and supportive learning environments for lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and questioning (LGBTQ) students. Lansing, MI: Michigan Department of Education, 9 pp.

Annotation: These voluntary guidelines are intended to support schools in creating an inclusive environment for all students in Michigan. Contents include best practice strategies for school districts to create a supportive learning environment with specific guidance on supporting transgender and gender nonconforming students. Definitions are included.

Contact: Michigan State Board of Education, 608 W. Allegan Street, Lansing, MI 48909, Telephone: (517) 373-3324 Web Site: http://www.michigan.gov/mde/0,4615,7-140-5373---,00.html Available from the website.

Keywords: Bullying, Child health, Child safety, Civil rights, Health promotion, Homosexuality, Injury prevention, Learning, Michigan, Nonconformity, Policy development, Protective factors, Risk factors, School districts, Schools, Sex characteristics, Sex role, Sexual harassment, Students, Violence prevention, Work force

National Center for HIV/AIDS, Viral Hepatits, STD, and TB Prevention, Division of Adolescent and School Health. [2015]. Bullying and absenteeism: Information for state and local education agencies. Atlanta, GA: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 1 p.

Annotation: This brief for state and local education agencies presents findings from the peer-reviewed literature on associations between in-person and electronic bullying victimization and missing school because of safety concerns among students in high school. The brief also describes what education agencies can do to prevent bullying. Topics include sharing information about potential education-related consequences of bullying, addressing electronic bullying beyond school boundaries, responding to co-occurring types of bullying, and opportunities for collaboration with health professionals.

Contact: National Center for HIV/AIDS, Viral Hepatits, STD, and TB Prevention, Division of Adolescent and School Health, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 4770 Buford Highway, N.E., Mailstop K-29, Atlanta, GA 30341-3724, Telephone: 800-232-4636 Secondary Telephone: (888) 232-6348 E-mail: cdcinfo@cdc.gov Web Site: http://www.cdc.gov/healthyyouth Available from the website.

Keywords: Bullying, Collaboration, High school students, Injury prevention, Research, School attendance, State agencies, Violence prevention

Children's Defense Fund. 2015. Children in the states. Washington, DC: Children's Defense Fund, multiple items.

Annotation: This report lists statistics by state for children participating in: federally subsidized programs, the National School Lunch program during FY 1996, the School Breakfast Program during FY 1996, and the WIC Food program during FY 1996. For each state there is also a page listing statistics in the form of "every 23 hours a baby died, every 7 days a youth committed suicide." These are for infant morbidity and mortality, violence, lack of prenatal care, child abuse, lack of health insurance, and teenage and unmarried mothers.

Contact: Children's Defense Fund, 25 E Street, N.W., Washington, DC 20001, Telephone: (202) 628-8787 Secondary Telephone: (800) 233-1200 E-mail: cdfinfo@childrensdefense.org Web Site: http://www.childrensdefense.org $5.95 plus $3.00 shipping and handling for the first item ordered, and $1.00 for each additional item ordered.

Keywords: Child health, Child welfare, Federal programs, Health insurance, School breakfast programs, School lunch programs, Statistics, Violence, WIC Program

Robers S, Zhang A, Morgan RE, Musu-Gillette L. 2015. Indicators of school crime and safety: 2014. Washington, DC: National Center for Education Statistics and Bureau of Justice Statistics, annual.

Annotation: This annual report presents data on school crime and student safety. The indicators in the report are based on information drawn from a variety of data sources including national surveys of students, teachers, principals, and postsecondary institutions. The report covers topics such as victimization, teacher injury, bullying and cyberbullying, school conditions, fights, weapons, availability and student use of drugs and alcohol, student perceptions of personal safety at school, and criminal incidents at postsecondary institutions. Indicators of crime and safety are compared across different population subgroups and over time. Data on crimes that occur away from school are offered as a point of comparison where available.

Contact: National Center for Education Statistics, 1990 K Street, N. W., Washington, DC 20006, Telephone: (202) 502-7300 Secondary Telephone: (202) 502-7442 Fax: (202) 219-1736 Web Site: http://www.nces.ed.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Bullying, College students, Colleges, Crime, Data, Drug use, Environmental influences, Injuries, School age children, School safety, Schools, Trends, Violence, Weapons

National Center for Injury Prevention and Control, Division of Violence Prevention. 2015. Dating Matters® Initiative. Atlanta, GA: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, multiple items.

Annotation: This website provides information about a comprehensive dating violence prevention initiative focused on adolescents ages 11 to 14 in high-risk, urban communities. Contents include a video that describes the initiative and information about funding for implementation in middle schools and neighborhoods. The website also provides information about online training and profiles of grantees in Baltimore, MD; Chicago, IL; Ft. Lauderdale, FL: and Oakland, CA.

Contact: National Center for Injury Prevention and Control, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 4770 Buford Highway, N.E., Mailstop F-63, Atlanta, GA 30341-3717, Telephone: (800) CDC-INFO Secondary Telephone: (888) 232-6348 Fax: (770) 488-4760 E-mail: cdcinfo@cdc.gov Web Site: http://www.cdc.gov/injury/index.html Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent health programs, Adolescents, Cities, Comprehensive programs, Financing, Health promotion, Injury prevention, Middle schools, National initiatives, Neighborhoods, Relationships, Training, Violence prevention

Iowa Department of Public Health. 2014–. Parentivity. Des Moines, Iowa Department of Health,

Annotation: This web-based community for parents provides personalized content to reduce family risks and optimize parenting resourcefulness, family resilience, child growth, and school readiness. The website is designed to recognize early warning signs of risk in areas of health, prenatal care, parenting skills, family functioning, and child development and will alert parents and recommend supportive resources and strategies. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: Iowa Department of Public Health, 321 East 12th Street, Des Moines, IA 50319-0075, Telephone: (515) 281-7689 Secondary Telephone: (866) 227-9878 E-mail: https://www.idph.iowa.gov/Contact-Us Web Site: http://www.idph.iowa.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Academic achievement, Child development, Child health, Community development, Domestic violence, Family economics, Family support programs, Home visiting, Injury prevention, Parenting, Program coordination, Public private partnerships, School readinesss

U.S. Department of Justice, Office for Victims of Crime. 2014-. Through our eyes: Children, violence, and trauma. Washington, DC: U.S. Department of Justice, Office for Victims of Crime, multiple items.

Annotation: This video series for child-serving professionals provides first-hand accounts of how adult survivors' exposure to violence as children has affected them. Topics include treatments that work, the child advocacy center model, community-based approaches, addressing violence in the home, interventions in schools, innovations in juvenile justice, and a call to action. A resource guide, poster gallery, resources for adult survivors, and related resources are also available.

Contact: U.S. Department of Justice, Office for Victims of Crime, 810 Seventh Street, N.W., Eighth Floor, Washington, DC 20531, Web Site: http://www.ovc.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Children, Injury prevention, Intervention, Juvenile justice, Multimedia, Safety, Schools, Trauma, Videos, Violence

White House Task Force to Protect Students from Sexual Assault. 2014. Not alone: The first report of the White House Task Force to Protect Students from Sexual Assault. [Washington, DC]: White House Task Force to Protect Students from Sexual Assault, 20 pp.

Annotation: This report presents action steps and recommendations from a federal task force to protect students from sexual violence. Topics include using campus climate surveys to identify problems; preventing sexual assault on campus; responding effectively when a student is sexually assaulted; and improving the federal government's enforcement efforts, and making them more transparent.

Keywords: Community action, Crime prevention, Federal initiatives, Injury prevention, Interpersonal violence, Judicial actions, Policy development, Program improvement, Public private partnerships, Schools, Sexual assault, Students, Surveys, Training, Trauma, Violence prevention

My Brother's Keeper Task Force. 2014. My Brother's Keeper Task Force report to the president. Washington, DC: Executive Office of the President, 61 pp.

Annotation: This report describes progress on a national initiative to address persistent opportunity gaps faced by boys and young men of color. The report outlines the building blocks for success across key life stages and presents initial recommendations and areas of opportunity for each of the key milestones. The focus areas include entering school ready to learn, reading at grade level by third grade, graduating from high school ready for college and career, completing postsecondary education or training, entering the work force, reducing violence, and providing a second chance. Cross-cutting areas of opportunity that span all focus areas are also discussed.

Contact: White House, Executive Office of the President, Web Site: http://www.whitehouse.gov/administration/eop Available from the website.

Keywords: Academic achievement, Adolescent males, Barriers, Cultural factors, Economic factors, Ethnic factors, Graduation, Juvenile justice, Learning, Life course, Men, Minority groups, Reading, School to work transition, Social factors, Violence prevention, Work family issues, Work force, Young adults

Willoughby B. (2013). A guide for administrators, counselors and teachers: Responding to hate and bias at school. Montgomery, AL: Teaching Tolerance, 41 pp.

Annotation: This book, primarily for school administrators, also helps teachers, staff, counselors, and students find guidance in responding to a bias incident or hate crime. The guide is divided into three sections: before, during, and after a crisis occurs. Topics include assessing the school climate with an eye towards defusing tension, preventing escalation, and avoiding problems; key points to consider when responding to a bias or hate incident; and addressing long-term planning and capacity building for the future, including development of social and emotional skills.

Contact: Teaching Tolerance, c/o Southern Poverty Law Center , 400 Washington Avenue, Montgomery, AL 36104, Telephone: (334) 956-8200 Fax: (334) 956-8488 E-mail: http://www.tolerance.org/contact-us Web Site: http://www.tolerance.org/ Available from the website.

Keywords: Crisis intervention, Emergencies, Hate crime, Needs assessment, School counseling, School health services, School personnel, School violence

Lorenzo SB. 2013. Teen violence prevention: Resources for families (upd.). Washington, DC: National Center for Education in Maternal and Child Health, 1 p.

Annotation: This brief is designed to help families find hotlines and websites about teen violence prevention. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Center for Education in Maternal and Child Health, Georgetown University, Box 571272, Washington, DC 20057-1272, Telephone: (202) 784-9770 E-mail: mchgroup@georgetown.edu Web Site: https://www.ncemch.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescents, Bibliographies, Electronic publications, Families, Hotlines, School violence, Violence, Violence prevention

Masiello MG, Schroeder D. 2013. A public health approach to bullying prevention. Washington, DC: American Public Health Association, 355 pp.

Annotation: This book presents a public health approach to bullying prevention for parents and professionals looking for advice on specific facets of school-based bullying. The book focuses on public health strategies to provide a scientific approach to community planning, the use of evidence-based programs, coalition development, and the ability to change the culture in a school and community to one that is positive and strong. Topics include social and mental health consequences of bullying; practical implications for school administrators; health consequences; creating healthy school climates for lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgendered students; best practices; foundations of coalition building; community engagement; a call to action for schools and legislators; and program sustainability.

Contact: American Public Health Association, 800 I Street, N.W., Washington, DC 20001-3710, Telephone: (202) 777-2742 Secondary Telephone: Fax: (202) 777-2534 E-mail: comments@apha.org Web Site: http://www.apha.org $50 (non-members), plus shipping and handling. Document Number: ISBN 978-0-87553-203-5.

Keywords: Bullying, Community participation, Homosexuality, Mental health, Public health, School linked programs, School safety, Schools, Social factors, Students, Violence prevention

Simon TR, Ritter NM, Mahendra RR, eds. 2013. Changing course: Preventing gang membership. Atlanta, GA: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Injury Control and Prevention; Washington, DC:National Institute of Justice, 167 pp.

Annotation: This book, which focuses on preventing children and adolescents from joining gangs, comprises chapters written by a variety of criminal justice and public health researchers. Topics include consequences of gang membership; why prevention is important; the scope of the problem; why children and adolescents join gangs; the nexus of public safety and public health; the roles of public health, law enforcement, child development, families, schools, communities, race, and ethnicity; preventing girls from joining gangs; and the importance of evaluation.

Contact: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 1600 Clifton Road, Atlanta, GA 30329-4027, Telephone: (800) 232-4636 Secondary Telephone: (888) 232-6348 E-mail: cdcinfo@cdc.gov Web Site: http://www.cdc.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent behavior, Adolescent development, Child behavior, Child development, Communities, Ethnic factors, Families, Gangs, Law enforcement, Prevention, Program evaluation, Public health, Racial factors, Safety, Schools, Violence prevention

Futures Without Violence. 2013. Start strong: Building healthy teen relationships. San Francisco, CA: Futures Without Violence, 1 v.

Annotation: This toolkit provides information and resources for promoting healthy relationships among adolescents ages 11-14. Contents include evaluation findings on healthy relationship development and adolescent dating violence prevention efforts from 11 sites. Topics include elements of success including educating adolescents in and out of school, engaging influencers, social marketing, and policy change. Case studies, lessons learned, videos, and other resources are included.

Contact: Futures Without Violence, 100 Montgomery Street, The Presidio, San Francisco, CA 94129-1718, Telephone: (415) 678-5500 Fax: (415) 529-2930 E-mail: info@futureswithoutviolence.org Contact E-mail: info@startstrongteens.org Web Site: http://futureswithoutviolence.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescents, Middle schools, Model programs, Multimedia, Prevention programs, Program evaluation, Relationships, Research, Teaching, Violence prevention

Brandt R, Phillips R. 2013. Improving supports for youth of color traumatized by violence. Washington, DC: Center for Law and Social Policy, 11 pp.

Annotation: This report provides information about the most effective ways to support male children and adolescents traumatized by exposure to violence. The report introduces the problem and then discusses theoretical models and approaches, including school-based employment-based, and care-coordination strategies, improved implementation of service systems; and action steps.

Contact: Center for Law and Social Policy, 1200 18th Street, N.W., Suite 200, Washington, DC 20036, Telephone: (202) 906-8000 Fax: (202) 842-2885 E-mail: http://www.clasp.org/about/contact Web Site: http://www.clasp.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent behavior, Adolescent development, Adolescent males, Behavior modification, Behavior problems, Child behavior, Child development, Communities, Families, Health care systems, High risk adolescents, High risk children, Low income groups, Male children, Poverty, Prevention, Programs, Racial factors, Schools, Service delivery, Trauma, Violence, Violence prevention

White House, Executive Office of the President. 2013. Now Is the Time: The President's plan to protect our children and our communities by reducing gun violence. Washington, DC: White House, Executive Office of the President, 15 pp.

Pilnik L, Kendall JR. 2012. Victimization and trauma experienced by children and youth: Implications for legal advocates. North Bethesda, MD: Safe Start Center, 16 pp. (Moving from evidence to action; issue brief no. 8)

Annotation: This issue brief focuses on the impact of exposure to violence in school settings and examines how emerging research and program practice can help school staff to develop programs that meet the needs of children and youth who are exposed to violence. The brief analyzes case scenarios and proposes opportunities for intervention. It discusses the connections between children's exposure to violence and their mental wellness, ability to reach full academic potential, and academic outcomes; and describes promising practices to help teachers, mental health providers, school administrators, and state policy makers prevent and reduce the impact that violence has on children. A variety of evidence-based school mental health interventions are described, along with the challenges that may arise in implementing such programs. A list of guiding principles to support best practices is included.

Contact: Safe Start Center, Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention, 5515 Security Lane, Suite 800, North Bethesda, MD 20852-5007, Telephone: (800) 865-0965 E-mail: info@safestartcenter.org Web Site: http://www.safestartcenter.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Intervention, Mental health, Program development, School age children, School health programs, School violence, Violence

Rand Center for Domestic and International Health Security. 2011. Helping children cope with violence and trauma: A school-based program that works [Upd. ed.]. Santa Monica, CA: Rand Health, 7 pp. (Research highlights)

Annotation: This updated fact sheet describes a continuing school-based program implemented in the Los Angeles Unified School District that was designed to help children cope with violence. Students in the program lived in largely Hispanic neighborhoods. The fact sheet provides background about the problems faced by children exposed to violence, discusses the way the program was developed and the program's results, and offers conclusions. Statistical information is presented in figures in the fact sheet.

Contact: Rand Corporation, 1776 Main Street, Santa Monica, CA 90407-3208, Telephone: (310) 393-0411 Fax: 310-393-4818 E-mail: correspondence@rand.org Web Site: http://www.rand.org Available from the website.

Keywords: California, Child mental health, Children, Coping, Families, High risk children, Hispanic Americans, Low income groups, Parents, Programs, Schools, Students, Violence, Witnesses

National Center for Mental Health Promotion and Youth Violence Prevention. 2011. Bullying prevention state laws. Washington, DC: National Center for Mental Health Promotion and Youth Violence Prevention, 10 pp.

Annotation: This brief focuses on bullying prevention legislation. Topics include historic and current views of state legislation, elements of a bullying prevention plan, the school's legal responsibility, bullying as a civil rights issue, steps that secondary schools/high schools sites should take.

Contact: National Center for Mental Health Promotion and Youth Violence Prevention, Education Development Center, 43 Foundry Avenue, Waltham, MA 02453, Telephone: (877) 217-3595 Fax: (617) 969-5951 E-mail: info@promoteprevent.org Web Site: http://www.promoteprevent.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Bullying, Legal responsibility, Schools, State legislation, Violence prevention

Stein ND, Mennemeier KA. 2011. Addressing the gendered dimensions of harassment and bullying: What domestic and sexual violence advocates need to know. Harrisburg, PA: National Resource Center on Domestic Violence; Enola, PA: National Sexual Violence Resource Center, 17 pp. (Critical issue brief)

Annotation: This paper discusses the distinctions between bullying and harassment and the priorities and responsibilities of school districts. Topics include the unintended consequences of ignoring the gendered dimensions of bullying and harassment in K-12 schools and strategies for collaborating with school personnel and students.

Contact: National Online Resource Center on Violence Against Women, National Resource Center on Domestic Violence, 3605 Vartan Way, Suite 101, Harrisburg, PA 17110, Telephone: (800) 537-2238 Secondary Telephone: (800) 553.2508 Fax: (717) 545-9456 Web Site: http://www.vawnet.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Bullying, Gender discrimination, Legal responsibility, Policy analysis, Schools, Sexual harassment, Violence prevention

    Next Page »

This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number U02MC31613, MCH Advanced Education Policy, $3.5 M. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.