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Strengthening the evidence for maternal and child health programs

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Items in this list may be obtained from the sources cited. Contact information reflects the most current data about the source that has been provided to the MCH Digital Library.


Displaying records 1 through 20 (26 total).

Health Services for Children with Special Needs, The National Alliance to Advance Adolescent Health, and District of Columbia Department of Health. 2016. Health care transition for adolescents and young adults: An online video CME series. Washington, DC: Health Services for Children with Special Needs, 1 v.

Annotation: This online course offers a brief review of clinical recommendations on transition and a tested quality improvement model. It also features physicians in pediatric, family medicine, and internal medicine practices in the District of Columbia who successfully implemented core elements of health care transition using quality improvement methodologies.

Contact: Health Services for Children with Special Needs, 1101 Vermont Avenue, N.W., Suite 1200, Washington, DC 20005, Telephone: (202) 467-2737 Secondary Telephone: (866) 937-4549 Fax: (202) 466-8514 Web Site: http://www.hscsn-net.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Continuing education, Distance education, Multimedia, School to work transition, Transition planning, Transitions, Youth in transition programs

Jim Casey Youth Opportunities Initiative. 2016. Preparing for the road ahead: Helping young people transition from foster care to adulthood. Baltimore, MD: Annie E. Casey Foundation, 24 pp.

Annotation: This report summarizes the successes and vision of a national initiative to help young people transition from foster care and thrive. Contents include information about the initiative's impact, timeline, core strategies, outcome areas, and next steps. The report describes how the initiative is helping young people in foster care achieve critical milestones in permanence, education, employment, financial capability, housing, physical and mental health, and social capital; how the initiative integrates young people's voices into its work; and how it collaborates with national and local partners, policymakers, and young people to create conditions that improve outcomes for youth transitioning to adulthood.

Contact: Annie E. Casey Foundation, 701 Saint Paul Street, Baltimore, MD 21202, Telephone: (410) 547-6600 Fax: (410) 547-6624 E-mail: webmail@aecf.org Web Site: http://www.aecf.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent health, Adolescents, Collaboration, Foster care, National initiatives, Outcome and process assessment, Program descriptions, Program evaluation, Public private partnerships, School to work transition, Transition planning, Transition to independent living, Transitions, Young adults, Youth development, Youth in transition programs

Federal Partners in Transition Strategic Planning Committee. 2015. The 2020 federal youth transition plan: A federal interagency strategy. Washington, DC: U.S. Department of Labor, Office of Disability Employment Policy, 32 pp.

Annotation: This document outlines a plan to enhance federal interagency coordination, to develop compatible goals to improve outcomes for youth with disabilities in transition, and to help agencies approach transition in a more integrated way that will lead to improved outcomes by 2020. Contents include definitions, history, and assumptions; a shared vision and the compatible outcome goals used to frame coordination across federal agencies and respective programs, the approach, examples of current federal cross-systems initiatives that support compatible outcome goals, and policy priorities that will inform work going forward.

Contact: U.S. Department of Labor, Office of Disability Employment Policy, Frances Perkins Building, 200 Constitution Avenue, N.W., Washington, DC 20210, Telephone: (202) 693-7880 Secondary Telephone: (866) 633-7365 Fax: (202) 693-7888 E-mail: infoDEP@dol.gov Web Site: http://www.dol.gov/odep Available from the website.

Keywords: Access to health care, Adolescents, Disabilities, Federal programs, Program improvement, School to work transition, Service integration, Special health care needs, Strategic plans, Transition planning, Transition to independent living, Young adults

U.S. Department of Labor, Office of Disability Employment Policy. 2015. Healthy transitions: A pathway to employment for youth with chronic health conditions and other disabilities. Washington, DC: U.S. Department of Labor, Office of Disability Employment Policy, 12 pp.

Annotation: This policy brief presents research findings about the relationship between disability (including chronic conditions), health and wellness, and transition and employment outcomes for youth with disabilities. The brief also examines the role health care professionals play in establishing employment expectations. Contents include information about the study methods, transition planning, and recommendations.

Contact: U.S. Department of Labor, Office of Disability Employment Policy, Frances Perkins Building, 200 Constitution Avenue, N.W., Washington, DC 20210, Telephone: (202) 693-7880 Secondary Telephone: (866) 633-7365 Fax: (202) 693-7888 E-mail: infoDEP@dol.gov Web Site: http://www.dol.gov/odep Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent health, Chronic illnesses and disabilities, Employment, Outcome and process assessment, Role, School to work transitions, Transition planning, Young adults

Youth Transitions Collaborative, Got Transition/Center for Health Care Transition Improvement, U.S. Department of Labor, Office of Disability Employment Policy. 2015. Transition quickguide: Take charge of planning and managing your own health and career goals. Washington, DC: Center for Health Care Transition Improvement, 6 pp.

Annotation: This checklist for youth and young adults, including those with disabilities and chronic health conditions, from ages 12-30, provides information and resources about health insurance coverage, self-care, health care transition, decision-making, and career planning and management. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: Got Transition™/Center for Health Care Transition Improvement, National Alliance to Advance Adolescent Health, 1615 M Street, N.W., Suite 290, Washington, DC 20036, Telephone: (202) 223-1500 Fax: (202) 429-3957 E-mail: info@GotTransition.org Web Site: http://gottransition.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescents, Decision making, Guidelines, Health insurance, Life skills, School to work transition, Special health care services, Transition planning, Young adults

U.S. Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration. 2014. Serious mental health challenges among older adolescents and young adults. Rockville, MD: U.S. Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, 14 pp. (The CBHSQ report)

Annotation: This report focuses on mental health problems, co-occurring mental health problems and substance use disorder, and mental health service use among older adolescents ages 16-17 and young adults ages 18 to 25. The report provides a snapshot of mental health issues among older adolescents and young adults overall and by key issues for the transition into adulthood such as housing, employment, education, and insurance coverage.

Contact: U.S. Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, One Choke Cherry Road, Rockville, MD 20857, Telephone: (877) SAMHSA-7 Secondary Telephone: (877) 726-4727 E-mail: Web Site: http://www.samhsa.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescents, Comorbidity, Health care utilization, Mental health, School to work transition, Substance use disorders, Transition to independent living, Young adults

My Brother's Keeper Task Force. 2014. My Brother's Keeper Task Force report to the president. Washington, DC: Executive Office of the President, 61 pp.

Annotation: This report describes progress on a national initiative to address persistent opportunity gaps faced by boys and young men of color. The report outlines the building blocks for success across key life stages and presents initial recommendations and areas of opportunity for each of the key milestones. The focus areas include entering school ready to learn, reading at grade level by third grade, graduating from high school ready for college and career, completing postsecondary education or training, entering the work force, reducing violence, and providing a second chance. Cross-cutting areas of opportunity that span all focus areas are also discussed.

Contact: White House, Executive Office of the President, Web Site: http://www.whitehouse.gov/administration/eop Available from the website.

Keywords: Academic achievement, Adolescent males, Barriers, Cultural factors, Economic factors, Ethnic factors, Graduation, Juvenile justice, Learning, Life course, Men, Minority groups, Reading, School to work transition, Social factors, Violence prevention, Work family issues, Work force, Young adults

Bonnie RJ, Stroud C, Breiner H, eds.; Institute of Medicine, Committee on Improving the Health, Safety, and Well-Being of Young Adults; National Research Council. 2014. Investing in the health and well-being of young adults. Washington, DC: National Academies Press, 433 pp.

Annotation: This report summarizes what is known about the health, safety, and well-being of young adults and offers recommendations for policy and research. Contents include a cross-cutting recommendation that applies to all policies and programs addressing young adults, whether public or private, in all sectors of society. Subsequent recommendations focus on the key domains of relationships, education and employment, civic engagement and national service, public health, the health care systems, and government investments in marginalized young adults.

Contact: National Academies Press, 500 Fifth Street, N.W., Keck 360, Washington, DC 20001, Telephone: (202) 334-3313 Secondary Telephone: (888) 624-8373 Fax: (202) 334-2451 E-mail: customer_service@nap.edu Web Site: http://www.nap.edu Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescents, Evidence based medicine, Health status, Preventive health services, School to work transition, Service integration, Transition planning, Transition to independent living, Young adults, Youth in transition programs

Wehman P. 2013. Life beyond the classroom: Transition strategies for young people with disabilities. (5th ed.). Baltimore, MD: Paul H. Brookes Publishing, 576 pp.

Annotation: This book is geared toward helping students, instructors, and professionals in rehabilitation programs define, plan, facilitate, and support transition for young people with disabilities into adulthood and independent living. The book is divided into three major sections: (1) defining and planning transition, (2) facilitating and supporting transition, and (3) designing and implementing individualized transition plans. Topics also include secondary school restructuring, college and other postsecondary alternatives, assistive technology to enhance transition and work, and recent legislative acts in the field. Each chapter contains a list of learning objectives, a conclusion, and study questions. Figures and tables throughout the book provide statistical data, sample forms and checklists, and additional information to illustrate needs and capabilities. Appendices are provided with selected chapters. References and an index conclude the book

Contact: Brookes Publishing, P.O. Box 10624, Baltimore, MD 21285-0624, Telephone: (800) 638-3775 Secondary Telephone: (410) 337-9580 Fax: (410) 337-8539 E-mail: custserv@brookespublishing.com Web Site: http://www.brookespublishing.com Available in libraries. Document Number: ISBN 1-55766-476-5.

Keywords: Adolescents with developmental disabilities, Assessment, Assistive devices, Brain injuries, Careers, Children with special health care needs, Cognition disorders, College bound students, College students, Emotional instability, Families, High school students, Parent participation, Postsecondary education, School to work transitions, Transition planning, Transition to independent living, Vocational education

U.S. Maternal and Child Health Bureau. 2013. The health and well-being of American Indian and Alaska Native children: Parental report from the National Survey of Children's Health, 2007. Rockville, MD: U.S. Maternal and Child Health Bureau, 77 pp.

Annotation: This chartbook presents indicators of the health and well-being of American Indian and Alaska Native children based on the perception of their parents or primary caregivers. Contents include indicators of child health status, health care use, school and activities, family, and neighborhood. National-, regional-, and state-level data are included. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: U.S. Maternal and Child Health Bureau, Health Resources and Services Administration, 5600 Fishers Lane, Rockville, MD 20857, Telephone: (301) 443-2170 Web Site: https://mchb.hrsa.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Academic achievement, Alaska Natives, American Indians, Children, Data, Environmental health, Family relations, Health care utilization, Health status, National surveys, Participation, Physical activity, School to work transition

Nemours Children's Health System. 2013. Becoming an adult. Jacksonville, FL: Nemours Children's Health System, 4 videos.

Annotation: This series of four videos provides information for families about changes that occur when a child with a disability or with special health care needs becomes a legal adult. Topics include taking responsibility for health care, deciding where to live, legal and financial planning, and vocational guidance.

Contact: Nemours Children's Health System, 10140 Centurion Parkway North, Jacksonville, FL 32256, Telephone: (904) 697-4100 Web Site: http://www.nemours.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescents, Consumer education, School to work transitions, Special health care needs, Transition planning, Transition to independent living, Young adults

Concept. 2013. Federal partners in transition national online dialogue: Participation metrics–Final report: September 23, 2013. Washington, DC: U.S. Department of Labor, Office of Disability Employment Policy, 21 pp.

Annotation: This report outlines the results of an online dialogue held on May 13 to May 27, 2013, among policymakers, service providers, advocates, youth with disabilities, and others to examine the impact of existing federal regulations and legislation on the successful transition from school to work of youth with disabilities, and to provide ideas on how to improve their transition outcomes. The report contains unedited posts (verbatim language of the commenters) that were rated to be the most popular ideas related to legislative and regulatory barriers and solutions and most popular ideas overall. Topics include education, employment, social security, health and human services.

Contact: U.S. Department of Labor, Office of Disability Employment Policy, Frances Perkins Building, 200 Constitution Avenue, N.W., Washington, DC 20210, Telephone: (202) 693-7880 Secondary Telephone: (866) 633-7365 Fax: (202) 693-7888 E-mail: infoDEP@dol.gov Web Site: http://www.dol.gov/odep Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescents, Barriers, Disabilities, School to work transition, Special health care needs, Transition to independent living, Young adults

Katzel A, LaVant A, Richards C. 2010. Blazing the trail: A new direction for youth development and leadership—Youth call to action. Washington, DC: National Collaborative on Workforce and Disability for Youth, 8 pp.

Annotation: This call-to-action outlines ten steps that young people can take to enhance their development and become leaders in their community and the nation. Included are guidelines to help youth learn about their rights and responsibilities, connect with the community, become self-advocates, learn about the disability movement, participate in the transition from youth to adulthood, research scholarships, obtain work experience, find or become a mentor, serve on decision-making boards, and help to train those who work with you. The recommended action steps are based on findings from the National Collaborative on Workforce and Disability for Youth (NCWD/Youth) Blazing the Trail summit held in August 2007, which brought together more than 200 youth and adults to discuss what action steps would help ensure that young people are prepared to move successfully from youth to adulthood.

Contact: National Collaborative on Workforce and Disability for Youth, c/o Institute for Educational Leadership, 4455 Connecticut Avenue, N.W., Stuie 310, Washington, DC 20008, Telephone: (877) 871-0744 Secondary Telephone: (877) 871-0665 Web Site: http://www.ncwd-youth.info Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescents, Collaboration, Disability, Guidelines, Leadership, School to work transition, Service learning, Youth development

Wolraich M. 2009. Sooner SUCCESS: State implementation grants for integrated community systems for CSHCN. [Final report]. Oklahoma City, OK: Board of Regents University of Oklahoma, 185 pp.

Annotation: This final report for the Sooner SUCCESS (State Unified Children's Comprehensive Exemplary Service for Special Needs) program discusses the project purpose; goals and objectives; methodogy; evaluation; results, outcomes, and lessons learned; publications and products; dissemination and utilization of results; and sustainability. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: Maternal and Child Health Library at Georgetown University, Box 571272, Washington, DC 20057-1272, Telephone: (202) 784-9770 E-mail: mchgroup@georgetown.edu Web Site: https://www.mchlibrary.org

Keywords: Final reports, Adolescents with special health care needs, Children with special health care needs, Communities, Community health services, Families, Family support services, Health care systems, Medical home, Oklahoma, Parents, School to work transition, Service coordination, Service integration, Transition to independent living, Youth in transition programs

Larson, M. 2009. Supporting transition to adulthood among youth with mental health needs: Action steps for policymakers. Washington, DC: National Collaborative on Workforce and Disability for Youth, 10 pp. (Policy brief; issue 2)

Annotation: This policy brief calls attention to the challenges that adolescents and young adults with mental health problems face during their transition to adulthood, and it provides policymakers at the state and local levels with information to help them develop and improve service-delivery systems for this population. Topics include (1) losing access to treatment because of different eligibility criteria in child vs. adult systems, (2) reports related to the needs of adolescents and young adults with mental health problems; (3) promising mental health recovery models, (4) competitive employment, (5) collaboration, and (6) state policies,

Contact: National Collaborative on Workforce and Disability for Youth, c/o Institute for Educational Leadership, 4455 Connecticut Avenue, N.W., Stuie 310, Washington, DC 20008, Telephone: (877) 871-0744 Secondary Telephone: (877) 871-0665 Web Site: http://www.ncwd-youth.info Available from the website.

Keywords: Access to health care, Adolescent mental health, Adolescents, Collaboration, Eligibility, Employment, Mental disorders, Mental health, Model programs, Public policy, School to work transition, Service delivery systems, State programs, Treatment, Young adults

Arc of Illinois, Family to Family Health and Education Center. 2008. Family manual: Transition to employment and adult services for youth with developmental disabilities in Illinois. (Rev ed.). Homewood, IL: Family to Family Health and Educatin Center, The ARC of Illinois, 58 pp.

Annotation: The purpose of this manual is to assist families of young adults with developmental disabilities with the transition from the school system and services for children to the world of work and adult services. Topics include special education and transition planning; children's waiver for developmental disabilities; straight talk on the PUNS (Illinois waiting list); the world of adult services and supports; adult waiver for developmental disabilities; health insurance and employment; services, supports, options, and trends; and who can help with advocacy for children and adults with developmental disabilities.

Contact: Arc of Illinois, Family to Family Health Information Center, 20901 LaGrange Road, Suite 209, Frantfort, IL 60423, Telephone: (815) 464-8247 Secondary Telephone: (866) 931-1110 Fax: (815) 464-5292 E-mail: info@thearcofil.org Web Site: http://familyvoicesillinois.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescents with developmental disabilities, Adolescents with special health care needs, Employment, Families, Health insurance, Illinois, School to work transition, Services, Transition planning, Trends, Young adults, Young adults

ASD Expert Working Group. 2005. Autism spectrum disorders (ASD) roadmap. Silver Spring, MD: Social and Scientific Systems, 17 pp.

Annotation: This action plan provides a national blueprint to enhance existing systems; expand services for children, adolescents, and adults with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and their families; and coordinate services across systems. The document discusses (1) achieving family and professional partnerships, (2) early and continuous developmental and medical screening for autism, (3) access to all needed ASD health, mental health, education, and social services, (4) organization of community-based services for easy use, (5) youth transition to adult services, work, and independence, and (6) appropriate financing of care. For each of these topic areas, a goal, challenges, and recommendations are presented.

Contact: Waisman Center for Mental Retardation and Human Development, University of Wisconsin, Madison, 1500 Highland Avenue, Madison, WI 53705-2280, Telephone: (608) 263-5776 Secondary Telephone: (608) 263-1656 Fax: (608) 263-0529 Web Site: http://www.waisman.wisc.edu Available from the website.

Keywords: Children with special health care needs, Adolescent, Adults, Autism, Community based services, Education, Families, Financing, Health care systems, Health services, Mental health, Program coordination, School to work transition, Service coordination, Social services, Transition planning, Youth in transition program

Washington State Department of Health, Adolescent Health Transition Project. 2003. Working together for successful transition: Washington State adolescent transition resource notebook. Olympia, WA: Adolescent Health Transition Project, Washington State Department of Health, ca. 350 pp.

Annotation: This notebook is a resource on transition from adolescence to young adulthood for young adults with special health care needs and disabilities.The notebook is geared toward families, students, school personnel, community agency workers, health professionals, and other groups working with adolescents and young adults in Washington State. The notebook is organized into the following sections: (1) transition overview, (2) the student, (3) school, (4) post-secondary education, (5) work, volunteering, community participation, (6) division of vocational rehabilitation, (7) community resources, (8) recreation, (9) legal matters, (10) Division of Developmental Disabilities, (11) Supplemental Security Income, (12) health, and (13) transition stories. The notebook contains one appendix that includes information on multicultural and translated resources, acronyms and definition, health insurance terms and definitions, sample forms, information on educational resources, and a transition guide for Washington State.

Contact: Washington State Department of Health, Office of Maternal and Child Health, Children with Special Health Care Needs Program, P.O. Box 47835, Olympia, WA 98504-7835, Telephone: (360) 236-3571 E-mail: cshcn.support@doh.wa.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescents with special health care needs, Community participation, Developmental disabilities, Education, Health, Legislation, Recreation, School to work transition, Schools, Students, Supplemental security income, Transition to independent living, Vocational rehabilitation, Volunteers, Washington, Young adults, Youth

Yohale N, Pittman K. 2001. Powerful pathways: Framing options and opportunities for vulnerable youth. Gaithersburg, MD: Youth Development and Research Fund; Takoma Park, MD: Forum for for Youth Investment, 48 pp. (A discussion paper of the Youth Transition Funders Group)

Annotation: This paper outlines what is known about providing consistent and comprehensive support to vulnerable youth through education, foster care, social services, juvenile justice, welfare, and workforce preparation as they transition to adult life. Topics include describing the vulnerable youth population, racial and socio-economic factors, the importance of the role of education, aligning systems to ensure education and career development, innovations at the policy level, changing perceptions, and building public will. Section topics include the following: (1) vulnerable futures, (2) the imperatives: development, transition, transformation, (3) promising strategies, and (4) recommendations for the work ahead. References conclude the paper.

Contact: Forum for Youth Investment, 7064 Eastern Avenue, N.W., Washington, DC 20012, Telephone: (202) 207-3333 Fax: (202) 207-3329 E-mail: youth@forumfyi.org Web Site: http://www.forumfyi.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescents, Education, Foster care, Foster children, High risk adolescents, Incarcerated youth, Out of school youth, Political processes, School to work transition, Social work, Transitions, Vulnerability, Workplace, Youth in transition programs, Youth services

Pomeroy M, Everson JM, Fass AL. 2001. Health and medical issues for transition-age adolescents with disabilities and/or health care needs: A guide for teenagers and their families. (2nd ed.). New Orleans, LA: Human Development Center, Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center, 74 pp.

Annotation: This guide for adolescents and families discusses transitioning from adolescence to adulthood for adolescents with special health care needs. Topics include (1) why health and medical issues are an important part of transition planning; (2) preparing for independence at home, at school, and in the workplace; (3) paying for health care, (4) choosing and working with health professionals; (5) self-determination in health care; and (6) living a healthy lifestyle. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center, Human Development Center, 1900 Gravier Room 1035, New Orleans, LA 70112, Telephone: (504) 556-7585 Fax: (504) 556-7574 Web Site: http://www.hdc.lsuhsc.edu Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescents with special health care needs, Chronic illnesses and disabilities, Consumer education materials, Costs, Health care, School to work transition, Transition planning, Transition to independent living, Transitions

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This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number U02MC31613, MCH Advanced Education Policy, $3.5 M. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.