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Strengthen the Evidence for Maternal and Child Health Programs

Search Results: MCHLine

Items in this list may be obtained from the sources cited. Contact information reflects the most current data about the source that has been provided to the MCH Digital Library.


Displaying records 1 through 20 (65 total).

Hall E. 2017. Identifying a school quality/student success indicator for ESSA: Requirements and considerations. Washington, DC: Council of Chief State School Officers, 12 pp.

Annotation: This brief describes the Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA) requirements for the inclusion of a school quality or student success indicator (referred to as the "5th indicator), including requirements to ensure that the indicator contributes to a state's system of school and district accountability. Highlights include key factors to consider when identifying, evaluating, and implementing a school quality or student success indicator for inclusion in a state's accountability system. Examples of school quality and student success indicators and research supporting those indicators are included.

Contact: Council of Chief State School Officers, One Massachusetts Avenue, N.W., Suite 700, Washington, DC 20001-1431, Telephone: (202) 336-7000 Fax: (202) 408-8072 E-mail: info@ccsso.org Web Site: http://www.ccsso.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Accountability, Evaluation, Limited English speakers, Measures, Program improvement, Quality assurance, Regulations, School districts, Schools, Students, Systems development

Roche MK, Blank M, Jacobson R. 2017. Community schools: A whole-child framework for school improvement. Washington, DC: Institute for Educational Leadership, Coalition for Community Schools, 26 pp.

Annotation: This paper proposes community schools as a strategy for school improvement. Topics include what a community school looks like at the school level, how community schools support provisions in the Every Student Succeeds Act, and how states can support community schools. Information about community school and initiative exemplars, resources, and partners are included.

Contact: Institute for Educational Leadership, Coalition for Community Schools, 4301 Connecticut Avenue, N.W., Suite 100, Washington, DC 20008-2304, Telephone: (202) 822-8405 X111 Fax: (202) 872-4050 E-mail: ccs@iel.org Web Site: http://www.communityschools.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescents, Children, Coalitions, Collaboration, Community coordination, Community participation, Equal opportunities, Families, Learning, Models, Organizational change, Program improvement, Public private partnerships, Relationships, School districts, Schools, Service integration, Social support, Systems development

Love HL, Soleimanpour S, Schelar E, Even M, Carrozza M, Grandmont J. 2016. The children's health and education mapping tool. Washington, DC: School-Based Health Alliance, 1 v.

Annotation: This tool contains county-level information on child health, education, and socioeconomic status that can be searched, mapped, downloaded, and compared to national averages. Users can also map, filter, and display key characteristics of public school and school-based health center locations. A user manual and video tutorials are provided.

Contact: School-Based Health Alliance, 1010 Vermont Avenue, N.W., Suite 600, Washington, DC 20005, Telephone: (202) 638-5872 Secondary Telephone: (888) 286-8727 Fax: (202) 638-5879 E-mail: info@nasbhc.org Web Site: http://www.sbh4all.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Child health, Data, Education, Information systems, Integrated information systems, Maps, School based clinics, Schools, Socioeconomic status

Stark DR. 2016. Equity starts early: How chiefs will build high-quality early education. Washington, DC: Council of Chief State School Officers, 22 pp.

Annotation: This document for chief state school officers focuses on ways to prioritize and strengthen early learning opportunities and outcomes as an essential mechanism for closing the achievement gap and strengthening student outcomes through college and career. Contents include five action steps that chiefs can use to leverage the value of early childhood education for their state's public education system. Topics include engaging families and communities in early learning; connecting early childhood programs and elementary schools; accelerating improvement and innovation in early childhood programs; building a high performing early childhood work force; and increasing investment to provide quality, voluntary early childhood education for all children. Examples of state leadership are included.

Contact: Council of Chief State School Officers, One Massachusetts Avenue, N.W., Suite 700, Washington, DC 20001-1431, Telephone: (202) 336-7000 Fax: (202) 408-8072 E-mail: info@ccsso.org Web Site: http://www.ccsso.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Community action, Diffusion of innovation, Early childhood development, Early childhood education, Elementary schools, Equal opportunities, Families, Leadership, Learning, Program improvement, Public education, Systems development, Work force, Young children

Hamilton J. 2016. Children’s Oral Healthcare Access Program [final report]. Cooperstown, NY: Mary Imogene Bassett Hospital, 22 pp.

Annotation: This report describes a project to expand preventive school-based oral health services to include restorative care in four high-need rural school districts in New York. Topics include delivery-system design, interdisciplinary care, client/community education, continuous quality improvement, sustainability, evaluation, and resources and capabilities. Appendices include the project services timeline, a risk-assessment tool, a workflow diagram, enrollment and consent forms, posters, a brochure, video links, promotional materials, a satisfaction survey, and a press release. The process, outcome, and impact indicators/minimal data set is also provided. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Maternal and Child Oral Health Resource Center, Telephone: (202) 784-9771 E-mail: OHRCinfo@georgetown.edu Web Site: https://www.mchoralhealth.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Comprehensive health care, Dental care, Final reports, Health services delivery, Interdisciplinary approach, Local initiatives, Model programs, New York, Oral health, Program improvement, Quality assurance, Rural population, School based clinics, School districts, Service integration, Systems development

Barzaga C. 2016. Children’s Oral Healthcare Access Program [final report]. Pomona, CA: Center for Oral Health, 19 pp. plus appendices.

Annotation: This report describes a project to implement comprehensive oral health services in two school-based health centers operating in the Los Angeles Unified School District. Topics include delivery-system design, interdisciplinary care, client/community education, continuous quality improvement (CQI), sustainability, evaluation, and resources and capabilities. Appendices include the CQI plan, integration report, operations manual, and spatial analysis. A break-even analysis and process, outcome, and impact indicators/minimal data set are also provided. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Maternal and Child Oral Health Resource Center, Telephone: (202) 784-9771 E-mail: OHRCinfo@georgetown.edu Web Site: https://www.mchoralhealth.org Available from the website.

Keywords: California, Comprehensive health care, Dental care, Final reports, Health services delivery, Interdisciplinary approach, Local initiatives, Model programs, Oral health, Program improvement, Quality assurance, School based clinics, School districts, Service integration, Systems development, Urban population

Wovcha S. 2016. Children’s Oral Healthcare Access Program [final report]. Minneapolis, MN: Children's Dental Services, 26 pp. plus appendices.

Annotation: This report describes a project to integrate comprehensive oral health care into a school-based health center in Minneapolis, MN. Topics include delivery-system design, interdisciplinary care, client/community education, continuous quality improvement (CQI), sustainability, evaluation, and resources and capabilities. A project brochure; a CQI plan; a memorandum of under- standing template; a permission form; and the process, outcome, and impact indicators/minimal data set are also available. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Maternal and Child Oral Health Resource Center, Telephone: (202) 784-9771 E-mail: OHRCinfo@georgetown.edu Web Site: https://www.mchoralhealth.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Comprehensive health care, Dental care, Final reports, Health services delivery, Interdisciplinary approach, Local initiatives, Minnesota, Model programs, Oral health, Program improvement, Quality assurance, School based clinics, Service integration, Systems development, Urban population

Poerio D. 2016. Children’s Oral Healthcare Access Program [final report]. East Hartford, CT: Integrated Health Services, 16 pp.

Annotation: This report describes a project to expand a school-based health center oral health program in East Hartford, CT. Topics include delivery-system design, interdisciplinary care, client/community education, continuous quality improvement, sustainability, evaluation, and resources and capabilities. The appendices include parent permission forms for screening and treatment in English and Spanish, a program brochure, a referral list and forms, and a sterilization log. The process, out- come, and impact indicators/minimal data set is also provided. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Maternal and Child Oral Health Resource Center, Telephone: (202) 784-9771 E-mail: OHRCinfo@georgetown.edu Web Site: https://www.mchoralhealth.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Comprehensive health care, Connecticut, Dental care, Final reports, Health services delivery, Interdisciplinary approach, Local initiatives, Model programs, Oral health, Program improvement, Quality assurance, School based clinics, Service integration, Spanish language materials, Systems development, Urban population

Anastos E. 2016. Children’s Oral Healthcare Access Program [final report]. Lemon Grove, CA: Lemon Grove School District, 16 pp. plus attachments.

Annotation: This report describes a project to build a dental clinic and provide comprehensive oral health services to students attending a combined elementary and middle school (kindergarten through eighth grade) in Lemon Grove, CA. Topics include delivery-system design, interdisciplinary care, client/community education, continuous quality improvement, sustainability, evaluation, and resources and capabilities. Appendices include an announcement about the clinic opening, sample forms in English and Spanish, a needs-assessment cover letter and survey, a program brochure, and a memorandum of under- standing between the university and the school district. The process, outcome, and impact indicators/minimal data set is also provided. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Maternal and Child Oral Health Resource Center, Telephone: (202) 784-9771 E-mail: OHRCinfo@georgetown.edu Web Site: https://www.mchoralhealth.org Available from the website.

Keywords: California, Comprehensive health care, Dental care, Elementary schools, Facility design and construction, Final reports, Health services delivery, Interdisciplinary approach, Local initiatives, Middle schools, Model programs, Oral health, Program improvement, Quality assurance, Rural population, School based clinics, Service integration, Spanish language materials, Systems development

Greenberg B, Saglimbeni M. 2016. NYS School-Based Comprehensive Oral Healthcare Services Project: Final report 2011–2015. Albany, NY: New York State Department of Health; Menands, NY: Health Research, 25 pp. incl. appendices.

Annotation: This report describes a project to improve the oral health of school-age children in an area in New York where there is a health professional shortage and most residents have low incomes. Topics include delivery-system design, interdisciplinary care, client/community education, continuous quality improvement, sustainability, evaluation, and resources and capabilities. Links to a cover letter and combined enrollment form; links to video programs; and the process, out- come, and impact indicators/minimal data set are also provided. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Maternal and Child Oral Health Resource Center, Telephone: (202) 784-9771 E-mail: OHRCinfo@georgetown.edu Web Site: https://www.mchoralhealth.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Children's Health Insurance Program, Community health centers, Comprehensive health care, Dental care, Final reports, Health services delivery, Interdisciplinary approach, Local initiatives, Medicaid, Model programs, New York, Oral health, Program improvement, Quality assurance, Rural population, Schools, Service integration, Systems development

Bruski K. 2016. Children’s Oral Healthcare Access Program [final report]. Costa Mesa, CA: Share Our Selves, 14 pp. plus appendices.

Annotation: This report describes a project to integrate an oral-health-care program into an existing school-based clinic serving students attending a public charter school (kindergarten through grade 8) in Santa Ana, CA. Topics include delivery-system design, interdisciplinary care, client/community education, continuous quality improvement, sustainability, evaluation, and resources and capabilities. Meeting agendas and minutes, a student consent form, and a program brochure and other outreach materials are included. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Maternal and Child Oral Health Resource Center, Telephone: (202) 784-9771 E-mail: OHRCinfo@georgetown.edu Web Site: https://www.mchoralhealth.org Available from the website.

Keywords: California, Comprehensive health care, Dental care, Final reports, Health services delivery, Interdisciplinary approach, Local initiatives, Model programs, Oral health, Outreach, Program improvement, Quality assurance, School based clinics, Service integration, Systems development, Urban population

Bruski K. 2016. Children’s Oral Healthcare Access Program (COHAP) [final report]. Suisun City, CA: Solano Coalition for Better Health, 45 pp.

Annotation: This report describes a coalition-led project to integrate comprehensive oral health services into an existing school-based health center in the Vallejo City Unified School District in California. Topics include delivery-system design, interdisciplinary care, client/community education, continuous quality improvement (CQI), sustainability, evaluation, and resources and capabilities. The project logic model, marketing tools, classroom-education materials, a performance-improvement-committee definition and plan, an appointment agreement and no show-policy, a CQI plan, and process and outcome data elements are included. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Maternal and Child Oral Health Resource Center, Telephone: (202) 784-9771 E-mail: OHRCinfo@georgetown.edu Web Site: https://www.mchoralhealth.org Available from the website.

Keywords: California, Comprehensive health care, Dental care, Final reports, Health services delivery, Interdisciplinary approach, Local initiatives, Model programs, Oral health, Program improvement, Quality assurance, School districts, Service integration, Systems development, Urban population

Major E. 2016. School Based Comprehensive Oral Health Services Grant Program final report. Frisco, CO: Summit Community Care Clinic, 17 pp.

Annotation: This report describes a project to provide access to preventive and restorative oral health care, demonstrate a decrease in dental caries incidence, show an increase in oral health literacy, and create a financially sustainable oral health program for children in Summit County, CO. Topics include delivery-system design, interdisciplinary care, client/community education, continuous quality improvement, sustainability, evaluation, and resources and capabilities. Appendices include a memorandum of understanding, enrollment and send-home forms, a permission form in English and Spanish, a screening survey tool, a student quiz, and a list of advisory board members. The process, outcome, and impact indicators/minimal data set is also provided. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Maternal and Child Oral Health Resource Center, Telephone: (202) 784-9771 E-mail: OHRCinfo@georgetown.edu Web Site: https://www.mchoralhealth.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Colorado, Comprehensive health care, Dental care, Final reports, Financing, Health services delivery, Interdisciplinary approach, Local initiatives, Model programs, Oral health, Program improvement, Quality assurance, Rural population, School districts, Service integration, Spanish language materials, Systems development

Chiang RJ. 2016. A guide for incorporating health & wellness into school improvement plans. Atlanta, GA: National Association of Chronic Disease Directors, 30 pp.

Annotation: This guide for public health agencies and other partners the purpose and role of improvement plans in schools and districts. The guide also outlines opportunities to incorporate health and wellness-related goals and aligned activities into school improvement plans and provides examples from schools and districts that have done it.

Contact: National Association of Chronic Disease Directors, 2200 Century Parkway, Suite 250, Atlanta, GA 30345, Telephone: (770) 458-7400 Web Site: https://chronicdisease.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Collaboration, Educational objectives, Goals, Health objectives, Planning, Program improvement, Public private partnerships, School districts, Schools, Systems development

Martinez A. 2016. School attendance, chronic health conditions and leveraging data for improvement: Recommendations for state education and health departments to address student absenteeism. Atlanta, GA: National Association of Chronic Disease Directors, 23 pp.

Annotation: This document for state education and health departments focuses on ways state school nurse consultants and other state school health personnel can support schools in reducing absences for students with chronic health conditions. Topics include the context and definitions of attendance as a measure, national efforts aimed at improving school attendance, challenges and opportunities related to collecting and using data on school attendance and chronic health conditions, collecting causes of school absence including chronic conditions, and recommendations for connecting school attendance and chronic health conditions to address absenteeism. Examples from Connecticut, Kentucky, and Massachusetts are included.

Contact: National Association of Chronic Disease Directors, 2200 Century Parkway, Suite 250, Atlanta, GA 30345, Telephone: (770) 458-7400 Web Site: https://chronicdisease.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Chronic illnesses and disabilities, Community action, Data analysis, Data collection, Leadership, Management information systems, Measures, Nursing, Program improvement, School attendance, School health services, School nurses, Schools, State departments of education, State health agencies, Students

SHAPE America. 2016. Answering frequently asked questions about adapted physical education. Reston, VA: SHAPE America, 20 pp.

Annotation: This guidance document answers common questions about providing physical education services for students with disabilities. The document was developed as a resource for physical educators, adapted physical educators, school district administrators, and parents as they work to provide consistent adapted physical education services for students with disabilities. Contents include descriptions of advocacy resources, legal guidelines, teaching tips, and commonly used motor assessments.

Contact: SHAPE America–Society of Health and Physical Educators, 1900 Association Drive, Reston, VA 20191-1598, Telephone: (800) 213-7193 Fax: (703) 476-9527 E-mail: Web Site: http://www.shapeamerica.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Assessments, Disabilities, Learning, Legal definitions, Motor development, Physical activity, Physical education, Resources for professionals, School districts, Service delivery systems, Students, Teaching

Center for Mental Health in Schools. 2016. Improving ESSA planning for student and learning supports. Los Angeles, CA: Center for Mental Health in Schools, 7 pp. (Research for school improvement and transformation: Policy notes)

Annotation: This document describes a framework for developing a comprehensive and equitable system to address barriers to student learning and teaching. The framework comprises student and learning supports within the context of a continuum of interconnected subsystems that promote healthy development and prevent problems, intervene early, and treat severe and chronic problems. Contents include how organizational and operational infrastructures can be reworked to enable the development, implementation, and sustainability of the approach.

Contact: Center for Mental Health in Schools, UCLA School Mental Health Project, Box 951563, Los Angeles, CA 90095-1563, Telephone: (310) 825-3634 Secondary Telephone: (866) 846-4843 Fax: (310) 206-8716 E-mail: smhp@ucla.edu Web Site: http://smhp.psych.ucla.edu Available from the website.

Keywords: Accountability, Barriers, Child development, Collaboration, Early intervention, Equal opportunities, Health promotion, Interdisciplinary approach, Learning, Organizational change, Policy development, Program improvement, Program planning, Resource allocation, School districts, Service integration, Standards, Students, Systems development, Teaching

Healthy Schools Network. 2016. Environmental health at school: New solutions put children first. Albany, NY: Healthy Schools Network, 28 pp.

Annotation: This report summarizes a conference held on June 6–7, 2016, in Washington, DC, to advance research, policies, and programs to reduce children's risk for environmental exposures in child care facilities and P–12 schools. Topics include opportunities for public health agencies to protect children from environmental threats in schools, state and local agency experiences in promoting healthy schools and healthy children, the Environmental Protection Agency's role in protecting children's health in child care and school settings, prevention and intervention pilots, advancing children's rights, and establishing a national children's environmental health commission.

Contact: Healthy Schools Network, 773 Madison Avenue, Albany, NY 12208, Telephone: (518) 462-0632 Fax: (518) 462-0433 E-mail: info@healthyschools.org Web Site: http://www.healthyschools.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Child care centers, Child safety, Children, Collaboration, Environmental exposure, Environmental health, Hazardous materials, Injury prevention, Intervention, Policy development, Preschool children, Program development, Research, Responsibility, Risk factors, Role, School age children, Schools, Systems development

Fobbs E, Grady K, Chiang RJ, Zavacky F. 2015. State school health policy matrix 2.0. [Atlanta, GA]: National Association of Chronic Disease Directors; [Washington, DC]: National Association of State Boards of Education; [Reston, VA]: Society of Health and Physical Educators, 31 pp.

Annotation: This guide outlines state-level school health policies related to competitive foods and beverages, physical education and physical activity, and administration of medication in the school environment. Contents include a direct link to the policy and information about which political entity or agency adopted the policy or issued guidance.

Contact: National Association of Chronic Disease Directors, 2200 Century Parkway, Suite 250, Atlanta, GA 30345, Telephone: (770) 458-7400 Web Site: https://chronicdisease.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Drugs, Health policy, Physical activity, Physical education, Policy development, School food services, Schools, Service delivery systems

U.S. Department of Education, U.S., Department of Health and Human Services, U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development, U.S. Department of Justice. 2015. Every Student, Every Day: Community toolkit to address and eliminate chronic absenteeism. Washington, DC: U.S. Department of Education , 57 pp.

Annotation: This toolkit offers information, suggested action steps, and lists of existing tools and resources—including evidence-based resources—for individuals, leaders, and systems to begin or enhance the work of effective, coordinated community action to address and eliminate chronic absenteeism. Contents include action steps for youth; parents and families; mentors and volunteers; school district superintendents and staff, and school personnel; early learning providers; health care, public health and human service agencies and providers; public housing authorities; juvenile justice and law enforcement; homeless service providers; mayors and local government; and community, faith-based, and philanthropic organizations.

Contact: U.S. Department of Education, 400 Maryland Avenue, S.W., Washington, DC 20202, Telephone: (800) 872-5327 Secondary Telephone: (800) 437-0833 Web Site: http://www.ed.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Collaboration, Community action, Coordination, Resources for professionals, School age children, School attendance, Schools, Systems development

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This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number U02MC31613, MCH Advanced Education Policy, $3.5 M. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.