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Strengthening the evidence for maternal and child health programs

Search Results: MCHLine

Items in this list may be obtained from the sources cited. Contact information reflects the most current data about the source that has been provided to the MCH Digital Library.


Displaying records 1 through 20 (104 total).

National Center on Early Childhood Health and Wellness. 2017. Healthy children are ready to learn. [Elk Grove Village, IL]: National Center on Early Childhood Health and Wellness, 6 pp.

Annotation: This fact sheet examines how health affects school readiness. Topics include oral health and learning and how family health and wellness support healthy child development. The fact sheet also explores how comprehensive services ensure that children are ready for school and how coordinated systems support health services. It is available in English and Spanish.

Contact: Early Childhood Learning and Knowledge Center, Telephone: (866) 763-6481 E-mail: health@ecetta.info Web Site: https://eclkc.ohs.acf.hhs.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Child development, Child health, Child mental health, Child safety, Family support services, Head Start, Infant health, School readiness, Spanish language materials, Young children

Michael SL, Zavacky F. 2017. Strategies for recess in schools. Reston, VA: SHAPE America–Society of Health and Physical Educators, 16 pp.

Annotation: This document describes strategies for planning and providing recess in schools to help increase participation in physical activity and improve academic achievement. Contents include information about the definition and benefits of recess and national guidance and considerations for recess in schools. Topics include making leadership decisions, communicating and enforcing behavior and safety expectations, creating an environment supportive of physical activity during recess, engaging the school community to support recess, gathering information on recess, and taking action. Additional planning resources, case studies, a video, and infographics are also available.

Contact: SHAPE America–Society of Health and Physical Educators, 1900 Association Drive, Reston, VA 20191-1598, Telephone: (800) 213-7193 Fax: (703) 476-9527 E-mail: Web Site: http://www.shapeamerica.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Academic achievement, Child health, Child safety, Community action, Decision making, Leadership, Multimedia, Physical activity, Policy development, Program planning, School age children, School health, Schools, Students

Michael SL, Zavacky F. 2017. Recess planning in schools: A guide to putting strategies for recess into practice. Reston, VA: SHAPE America–Society of Health and Physical Educators, 26 pp.

Annotation: This document is designed to help schools develop a school recess plan that can be shared with staff, students, and parents. Contents include questions that schools can consider to help them choose strategies to implement or to help them evaluate their current efforts, templates that schools can use to record information about the strategies they choose for their school recess plans, and key resources that align with the recommended recess strategies and provide additional information and examples of how to address these strategies. A companion document, Strategies for Recess in Schools, and additional planning resources; case studies; a video; and infographics are also available.

Contact: SHAPE America–Society of Health and Physical Educators, 1900 Association Drive, Reston, VA 20191-1598, Telephone: (800) 213-7193 Fax: (703) 476-9527 E-mail: Web Site: http://www.shapeamerica.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Academic achievement, Child health, Child safety, Community action, Decision making, Evaluation, Leadership, Multimedia, Physical activity, Planning, Policy development, Resources for professionals, School age children, School health, Schools, Students

Coalition for Healthier Schools. 2016. Back to school and beyond action kit. Albany, NY: Healthy Schools Network, multiple items.

Annotation: This toolkit provides resources on indoor environmental quality and children's health and ways to improve the school environment. Contents include a sample op-ed, information on buying healthy products, an indoor air quality and pest management checklist, a green cleaning checklist, a guide for parents on lead in school drinking water, and a guide on disinfecting wipes. Additional contents include research, federal resources, a position statement, and policy recommendations.

Contact: Healthy Schools Network, 773 Madison Avenue, Albany, NY 12208, Telephone: (518) 462-0632 Fax: (518) 462-0433 E-mail: info@healthyschools.org Web Site: http://www.healthyschools.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Community action, Environmental exposure, Environmental health, Hazards, Prevention, Resources for professionals, Risk factors, Safety, School age children, School health, Schools

National Coordinating Committee on School Health and Safety. 2016. NCCSHS 19th annual meeting: The Every Student Succeeds Act–What does it mean for student achievement, health and safety? [participant folder]. [no place]: National Coordinating Committee on School Health and Safety, 1 v.

Annotation: This binder contains materials from a meeting of federal agency and national nongovernmental organization staff held on May 20, 2015, in Rockville, Maryland, to discuss the Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA) and what it means for student achievement, health, and safety. Contents include the agenda, speaker biographies, a list of meeting participants, and a list of organizations participating in National Coordinating Committee on School Health and Safety (NCCSHS); handouts; small group discussion materials; and background materials. Topics include ESSA provisions intended to support safe and healthy students and how other federal agency program align with those provisions, the ESSA appropriations process including the development of regulations and provision of technical assistance to states for implementing the regulations, and high impact opportunities for connecting health and education. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: Maternal and Child Health Library at Georgetown University, Box 571272, Washington, DC 20057-1272, Telephone: (202) 784-9770 E-mail: mchgroup@georgetown.edu Web Site: https://www.mchlibrary.org Single photocopies available at no charge.

Keywords: Academic achievement, Collaboration, Community participation, Federal initiatives, Health promotion, Meetings, Nutrition, Physical education, Program coordination, Public policy, Public private partnerships, Relationships, School age children, School health education, School health programs, School health services, School safety

Healthy Schools Network. 2016. Towards healthy schools: Reducing risks to children. Albany, NY: Healthy Schools Network, 66 pp.

Annotation: This report features published media reports from states on school environmental conditions. Contents include data on key characteristics of schools, staff, and poverty levels; structural support mechanisms that exist for schools at the state level; and programs available in some states to address identified external impacts on children such as food allergies, hazardous cleaning products, indoor air quality, and lead and asbestos contamination. Information from interviews with state and county environmental health directors about children and learning environments are also included.

Contact: Healthy Schools Network, 773 Madison Avenue, Albany, NY 12208, Telephone: (518) 462-0632 Fax: (518) 462-0433 E-mail: info@healthyschools.org Web Site: http://www.healthyschools.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Data, Environmental exposure, Facilities, Financing, Mass media, Policy analysis, Public health services, Public schools, Risk factors, Safety, School age children, School health, State programs

Rhode Island Department of Elementary and Secondary Education and Department of Health. 2016. Rhode Island school health manual model guidelines. Providence, RI: Rhode Island Department of Elementary and Secondary Education and Department of Health, 12 pp.

Annotation: This manual for school nurses and other school health personnel provides recommendations, resources, and guidelines for coordinated school health practice and programs throughout Rhode Island. Topics include the role of the school nurse and school administrator; state statutes, regulations, and requirements; health services including dental screenings; and healthful school environment including statewide bullying policy.

Keywords: Guidelines, Models, Program coordination, Rhode Island, Role, School health programs, School health services, School nursing, School safety

National Institute of Justice. 2016. Safety, health, and wellness strategic research plan 2016–2021. Washington, DC: National Institute of Justice, 18 pp.

Annotation: This document describes current and projected efforts to promote the safety, health, and wellness of individuals affected by, or employed within, the criminal justice system. Contents include strategic priorities and action plans for promoting and supporting research, including research to understand how children and families of criminal justice-involved individuals are affected by the criminal justice system. Descriptions of ongoing research projects on topics such as school safety and school-based mental health services in a large metropolitan school district are also included.

Contact: National Institute of Justice, 810 Seventh Street, N.W., Washington, DC 20531, Telephone: (202) 307-2942 Fax: (202) 307-6394 Web Site: http://www.ojp.usdoj.gov/nij Available from the website.

Keywords: Child health, Child safety, Children, Criminal justice system, Families, Interdisciplinary approach, Mental health services, Multidisciplinary teams, Research, School safety, Schools, Strategic plans

Michigan State Board of Education. 2016. State Board of Education statement and guidance on safe and supportive learning environments for lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and questioning (LGBTQ) students. Lansing, MI: Michigan Department of Education, 9 pp.

Annotation: These voluntary guidelines are intended to support schools in creating an inclusive environment for all students in Michigan. Contents include best practice strategies for school districts to create a supportive learning environment with specific guidance on supporting transgender and gender nonconforming students. Definitions are included.

Contact: Michigan State Board of Education, 608 W. Allegan Street, Lansing, MI 48909, Telephone: (517) 373-3324 Web Site: http://www.michigan.gov/mde/0,4615,7-140-5373---,00.html Available from the website.

Keywords: Bullying, Child health, Child safety, Civil rights, Health promotion, Homosexuality, Injury prevention, Learning, Michigan, Nonconformity, Policy development, Protective factors, Risk factors, School districts, Schools, Sex characteristics, Sex role, Sexual harassment, Students, Violence prevention, Work force

Healthy Schools Network. 2016. Environmental health at school: New solutions put children first. Albany, NY: Healthy Schools Network, 28 pp.

Annotation: This report summarizes a conference held on June 6–7, 2016, in Washington, DC, to advance research, policies, and programs to reduce children's risk for environmental exposures in child care facilities and P–12 schools. Topics include opportunities for public health agencies to protect children from environmental threats in schools, state and local agency experiences in promoting healthy schools and healthy children, the Environmental Protection Agency's role in protecting children's health in child care and school settings, prevention and intervention pilots, advancing children's rights, and establishing a national children's environmental health commission.

Contact: Healthy Schools Network, 773 Madison Avenue, Albany, NY 12208, Telephone: (518) 462-0632 Fax: (518) 462-0433 E-mail: info@healthyschools.org Web Site: http://www.healthyschools.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Child care centers, Child safety, Children, Collaboration, Environmental exposure, Environmental health, Hazardous materials, Injury prevention, Intervention, Policy development, Preschool children, Program development, Research, Responsibility, Risk factors, Role, School age children, Schools, Systems development

Demissie Z, Brener ND, McManus T, Shanklin SL, Hawkins J, Kann L. 2015. School health profiles: Characteristics of health programs among secondary schools. Atlanta, GA: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 191 pp.

Annotation: This report summarizes a biennial survey of middle and high school principals and lead health education teachers to assess school health policies and practices in states, large urban school districts, and territories. Topics include school health education requirements and content, physical education and physical activity, practices related to bullying and sexual harassment, school health policies related to tobacco-use prevention and nutrition, school-based health services, family engagement and community involvement, and school health coordination. Maps, questionnaires, and data files are also available.

Contact: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 1600 Clifton Road, Atlanta, GA 30329-4027, Telephone: (800) 232-4636 Secondary Telephone: (888) 232-6348 E-mail: cdcinfo@cdc.gov Web Site: http://www.cdc.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Bullying, Community participation, Family school relations, Health policy, Nutrition, Physical activity, Physical education, Prevention programs, Program coordination, School health education, School health programs, School health services, School safety, Service coordination, Sexual harassment, Statistics, Surveys, Tobacco use, Trends

National Center for HIV/AIDS, Viral Hepatitis, STD, and TB Prevention, Division of Adolescent and School Health. 2015. Results from the School Health Policies and Practices Study 2014. Atlanta, GA: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 165 pp.

Annotation: This report provides school- and classroom-level data on each of the following 10 components of the Whole School, Whole Community, Whole Child model: health education, physical education and physical activity, nutrition environment and services, health services, counseling, psychological and social services, healthy and safe school environment, physical environment, employee wellness, family engagement, and community involvement. Information about oral health education, screening and referral, and professional development is included.

Contact: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 1600 Clifton Road, Atlanta, GA 30329-4027, Telephone: (800) 232-4636 Secondary Telephone: (888) 232-6348 E-mail: cdcinfo@cdc.gov Web Site: http://www.cdc.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Counseling, Data sources, Emergencies, Environmental exposure, Health education, Health services, Mental health, Nutrition, Physical activity, Physical education, Policy analysis, Prevalence, Prevention programs, Safety, School age children, School health, School health programs, Schools, Social services, Trends, Workplace health promotion

Robers S, Zhang A, Morgan RE, Musu-Gillette L. 2015. Indicators of school crime and safety: 2014. Washington, DC: National Center for Education Statistics and Bureau of Justice Statistics, annual.

Annotation: This annual report presents data on school crime and student safety. The indicators in the report are based on information drawn from a variety of data sources including national surveys of students, teachers, principals, and postsecondary institutions. The report covers topics such as victimization, teacher injury, bullying and cyberbullying, school conditions, fights, weapons, availability and student use of drugs and alcohol, student perceptions of personal safety at school, and criminal incidents at postsecondary institutions. Indicators of crime and safety are compared across different population subgroups and over time. Data on crimes that occur away from school are offered as a point of comparison where available.

Contact: National Center for Education Statistics, 1990 K Street, N. W., Washington, DC 20006, Telephone: (202) 502-7300 Secondary Telephone: (202) 502-7442 Fax: (202) 219-1736 Web Site: http://www.nces.ed.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Bullying, College students, Colleges, Crime, Data, Drug use, Environmental influences, Injuries, School age children, School safety, Schools, Trends, Violence, Weapons

U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. 2015. Energy savings plus health: Indoor air quality guidelines for school building upgrades. Washington, DC: U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, 125 pp.

Annotation: These guidelines are designed to assist school administrators and others in protecting and improving indoor air quality (IAQ) in schools during building upgrades, particularly energy efficiency upgrades and building renovation activities. Contents include fundamental principles of IAQ, the business case for integrating energy efficiency and IAQ, and assessment protocols and recommended actions. Topics include project planning and integrated design; moisture and mold; hazardous materials; indoor and outdoor contaminants and sources; heating, ventilation, and air conditioning; and safety. The appendices contain information about project planning and developing a project team, communication and education, and worker protection. A master verification checklist is also included.

Contact: U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Ariel Rios Building, 1200 Pennsylvania Avenue, N.W., Washington, DC 20460, Telephone: (202) 272-0167 Web Site: http://www2.epa.gov/children Available from the website.

Keywords: Air pollution, Assessment, Environmental exposure, Facility design and construction, Planning, Protocols, Safety, School age children, Schools

American Academy of Pediatrics, Children's Oral Health Initiative. 2015. Brush, Book, Bed: A program of the American Academy of Pediatrics—Implementation guide. Elk Grove Village, IL: American Academy of Pediatrics, 23 pp.

Annotation: This guide is designed to help pediatricians and other health professionals improve the implementation of oral health services in the medical home through the Brush, Book, Bed program by linking oral health information to messages about reading to children and setting a regular bedtime. The program is aimed at parents of infants and children ages 6 months to 6 years. Topics include workflow, training and resources, talking points, supplies and tips, dental referral, and coding for oral health services.

Contact: American Academy of Pediatrics, Children's Oral Health Initiative, 345 Park Boulevard, Itasca, IL 60143, Telephone: (866) 843-2271 Secondary Telephone: (847) 434-4779 E-mail: oralhealth@aap.org Web Site: https://www.aap.org/en-us/advocacy-and-policy/aap-health-initiatives/Oral-Health/Pages/Oral-Health.aspx Available from the website.

Keywords: Infants, Literacy, Oral health, Oral hygiene, Parenting, Pediatric care, Reading, Safety, School age children, Service integration, Sleep, Young children

Healthy Schools Network. 2015. Environmental health at school: Ignored too long. Albany, NY: Healthy Schools Network, 54 pp.

Annotation: This report summarizes a national facilitated workshop held on November 9–11, 2015, in Washington, DC, to develop research and policy recommendations for addressing environmental health hazards commonly found in the nation's PK–12 schools and child care facilities. Contents include the problem statement, identifying environmental health exposures in or near schools and child care facilities, and the needs and perspectives of state and county health departments. Topics include expanding or enhancing federal and state standards and guidelines and enforcement of environmental health in schools and child care facilities; developing prevention, intervention, and tracking programs; and developing training, education, and guidance for parents and guardians and for health care and public health professionals.

Contact: Healthy Schools Network, 773 Madison Avenue, Albany, NY 12208, Telephone: (518) 462-0632 Fax: (518) 462-0433 E-mail: info@healthyschools.org Web Site: http://www.healthyschools.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Child care centers, Collaboration, Environmental exposure, Environmental health, Hazardous materials, Injury prevention, Law enforcement, Policy development, Preschool children, Research, Risk factors, Safety, School age children, Schools

National Coordinating Committee on School Health and Safety. 2015. NCCSHS 18th annual meeting: Reducing chronic absenteeism–Promoting school attendance [participant folder]. [no place]: National Coordinating Committee on School Health and Safety, 1 v.

Annotation: This binder contains materials from a meeting of federal agency and national nongovernmental organization staff to discuss ways to reduce student absenteeism and promote school attendance held on May 20, 2015, in Rockville, Maryland. Contents include the agenda, speaker biographies, a list of meeting participants, and a list of organizations participating in National Coordinating Committee on School Health and Safety (NCCSHS); handouts; small group discussion materials; and background materials. Topics include the role of multiple sectors in promoting school attendance and opportunities for improved collaboration across sectors, how state and local programs and practices address school attendance, strategies to further information exchange and networking, and ideas for promoting the work of NCCSHS and strengthening relationships. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: Maternal and Child Health Library at Georgetown University, Box 571272, Washington, DC 20057-1272, Telephone: (202) 784-9770 E-mail: mchgroup@georgetown.edu Web Site: https://www.mchlibrary.org Single photocopies available at no charge.

Keywords: Academic achievement, Community participation, Federal initiatives, Health promotion, Meetings, Nutrition, Physical education, Program coordination, Public policy, Public private partnerships, Relationships, School age children, School health education, School health programs, School health services, School safety

Braff-Guajardo E, Hecht K. 2015. Kids and drinking water: A glass half full or half empty?. Washington, DC: Grantmakers In Health, 3 pp. (Views from the field)

Annotation: This paper discusses the importance of children drinking water. Contents include information about the importance of water consumption in preventing chronic disease; obstacles to ensuring that students have access to clean, safe drinking water in schools; drinking water challenges in communities; and opportunities for health funders to increase children’s access to and consumption of free, safe drinking water. Topics include improving access, prioritizing education, funding data collection and research, promoting multisectoral partnerships, and advocating for supportive policies. A policy framework to support healthy development in all children by investing in accessible, safe drinking water is included. .

Contact: Grantmakers In Health, 1100 Connecticut Avenue, N.W., Suite 1200, Washington, DC 20036-4101, Telephone: (202) 452-8331 Fax: (202) 452-8340 Web Site: http://www.gih.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Advocacy, Child health, Child safety, Community role, Environmental health, Environmental pollution, Financing, Fluid intake, Health promotion, Low income groups, Minority groups, Nutrition, Policy development, Public private partnerships, School role, Water

U.S. Department of Justice, Office for Victims of Crime. 2014-. Through our eyes: Children, violence, and trauma. Washington, DC: U.S. Department of Justice, Office for Victims of Crime, multiple items.

Annotation: This video series for child-serving professionals provides first-hand accounts of how adult survivors' exposure to violence as children has affected them. Topics include treatments that work, the child advocacy center model, community-based approaches, addressing violence in the home, interventions in schools, innovations in juvenile justice, and a call to action. A resource guide, poster gallery, resources for adult survivors, and related resources are also available.

Contact: U.S. Department of Justice, Office for Victims of Crime, 810 Seventh Street, N.W., Eighth Floor, Washington, DC 20531, Web Site: http://www.ovc.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Children, Injury prevention, Intervention, Juvenile justice, Multimedia, Safety, Schools, Trauma, Videos, Violence

National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Division of Population Health. 2014. School health index: A self-assessment and planning guide—Elementary school. Atlanta, GA: Division of Adolescent and School Health, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, 1 v.

Annotation: This guide provides step-by-step instructions for creating a school health improvement plan. The guide is designed to help communities identify the strengths and weaknesses of school policies and programs for promoting health and safety; develop an action plan for improving student health and safety; and involve teachers, parents, students, and other community members in improving school policies, programs, and services. Contents include instructions for site coordinators, eight self-assessment modules, and an action planning component. Topics include school health and safety policies and environment; health education; physical education and other physical activity programs; nutrition services; school health services; school counseling, psychological, and social services; health promotion for staff; and family and community involvement.

Contact: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 1600 Clifton Road, Atlanta, GA 30329-4027, Telephone: (800) 232-4636 Secondary Telephone: (888) 232-6348 E-mail: cdcinfo@cdc.gov Web Site: http://www.cdc.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Assessment, Community action, Community participation, Elementary schools, Environmental health, Family school relations, Health promotion, Nutrition, Physical activity, Physical education, Policy development, Program development, Program improvement, Program planning, Safety, School age children, School counseling, School health, School health education, School health services, Social services, Students

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This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number U02MC31613, MCH Advanced Education Policy, $3.5 M. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.