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Strengthening the evidence for maternal and child health programs

Search Results: MCHLine

Items in this list may be obtained from the sources cited. Contact information reflects the most current data about the source that has been provided to the MCH Digital Library.


Displaying records 1 through 20 (51 total).

Schubel J. 2017. Medicaid helps schools help children. Washington, DC: Center on Budget and Policy Priorities, 7 pp.

Annotation: This brief examines the role of Medicaid in funding critical health-related services for students with disabilities. Topics include providing reimbursement for health care services that are necessary for students with disabilities to succeed in school and ensuring schools' compliance with Individuals with Disabilities Education Act requirements, helping students to stay healthy and succeed academically, and connecting students to coverage. The brief also describes the long-term benefits of Medicaid for eligible children and the potential impact of spending reductions on students, local communities, and state budgets. The appendix contains a table on state and federal Medicaid spending in schools.

Contact: Center on Budget and Policy Priorities, 820 First Street N.E., Suite 510, Washington, DC 20002, Telephone: (202) 408-1080 Fax: (202) 408-1056 E-mail: center@cbpp.org Web Site: http://www.cbpp.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Academic achievement, Chronic illnesses and disabilities, Eligibility, Enrollment, Medicaid, Reimbursement, Role, School health services, Schools, Special health care needs, State programs, Students

National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Division of Population Health. 2017. Managing chronic health conditions in schools: The role of the school nurse. Atlanta, GA: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 3 pp.

Annotation: This fact sheet describes the role of school nurses in improving student academic achievement and decreasing absenteeism by helping students with chronic health conditions manage their condition. Topics include providing direct care such as giving children medications, providing case management, and advocating for students and their families to help them get the resources and support they need.

Contact: National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Division of Population Health, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 1600 Clifton Road, Atlanta, GA 30329-4027, Telephone: (800) 232-4636 Secondary Telephone: (888) 232-6348 E-mail: cdcinfo@cdc.gov Web Site: http://www.cdc.gov/NCCDPHP/dph Available from the website.

Keywords: Academic achievement, Case management, Chronic illnesses and disabilities, Disease management, Elementary schools, Families, Family support services, Health services delivery, Homeless persons, Program coordination, Role, School age children, School nurses, Students

U.S. Department of Education. 2016. Healthy students, promising futures: State and local action steps and practices to improve school-based health. Washington, DC: U.S. Department of Education, 16 pp.

Annotation: This toolkit contains information that details five high impact opportunities for states and local school districts to support communities through collaboration between the education and health sectors, highlighting best practices and key research in both areas. Contents include resources, programs, and services offered by non-governmental organizations.

Contact: U.S. Department of Education, 400 Maryland Avenue, S.W., Washington, DC 20202, Telephone: (800) 872-5327 Secondary Telephone: (800) 437-0833 Web Site: http://www.ed.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Case management, Collaboration, Communities, Community action, Educational reform, Eligibility, Health care reform, Health education, Health insurance, Health services delivery, Hospitals, Medicaid managed care, Needs assessment, Nutrition, Physical activity, Public private partnerships, Reimbursement, Role, School districts, State government, Students

Rhode Island Department of Elementary and Secondary Education and Department of Health. 2016. Rhode Island school health manual model guidelines. Providence, RI: Rhode Island Department of Elementary and Secondary Education and Department of Health, 12 pp.

Annotation: This manual for school nurses and other school health personnel provides recommendations, resources, and guidelines for coordinated school health practice and programs throughout Rhode Island. Topics include the role of the school nurse and school administrator; state statutes, regulations, and requirements; health services including dental screenings; and healthful school environment including statewide bullying policy.

Keywords: Guidelines, Models, Program coordination, Rhode Island, Role, School health programs, School health services, School nursing, School safety

Michigan State Board of Education. 2016. State Board of Education statement and guidance on safe and supportive learning environments for lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and questioning (LGBTQ) students. Lansing, MI: Michigan Department of Education, 9 pp.

Annotation: These voluntary guidelines are intended to support schools in creating an inclusive environment for all students in Michigan. Contents include best practice strategies for school districts to create a supportive learning environment with specific guidance on supporting transgender and gender nonconforming students. Definitions are included.

Contact: Michigan State Board of Education, 608 W. Allegan Street, Lansing, MI 48909, Telephone: (517) 373-3324 Web Site: http://www.michigan.gov/mde/0,4615,7-140-5373---,00.html Available from the website.

Keywords: Bullying, Child health, Child safety, Civil rights, Health promotion, Homosexuality, Injury prevention, Learning, Michigan, Nonconformity, Policy development, Protective factors, Risk factors, School districts, Schools, Sex characteristics, Sex role, Sexual harassment, Students, Violence prevention, Work force

Healthy Schools Network. 2016. Environmental health at school: New solutions put children first. Albany, NY: Healthy Schools Network, 28 pp.

Annotation: This report summarizes a conference held on June 6–7, 2016, in Washington, DC, to advance research, policies, and programs to reduce children's risk for environmental exposures in child care facilities and P–12 schools. Topics include opportunities for public health agencies to protect children from environmental threats in schools, state and local agency experiences in promoting healthy schools and healthy children, the Environmental Protection Agency's role in protecting children's health in child care and school settings, prevention and intervention pilots, advancing children's rights, and establishing a national children's environmental health commission.

Contact: Healthy Schools Network, 773 Madison Avenue, Albany, NY 12208, Telephone: (518) 462-0632 Fax: (518) 462-0433 E-mail: info@healthyschools.org Web Site: http://www.healthyschools.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Child care centers, Child safety, Children, Collaboration, Environmental exposure, Environmental health, Hazardous materials, Injury prevention, Intervention, Policy development, Preschool children, Program development, Research, Responsibility, Risk factors, Role, School age children, Schools, Systems development

Minnesota Department of Health, Child and Teen Checkups and Minnesota Department of Education, Early Learning Services. 2016. Sharing child information to coordinate early childhood special education (ECSE) referrals: Guidance for clinics and schools. St. Paul, MN: Minnesota Department of Health, Child and Teen Checkups; Roseville, MN: Minnesota Department of Education, Early Learning Services, 2 pp.

Annotation: This document provides guidance for clinics and schools on the roles and responsibilities of medical providers and educational professionals in identifying and treating developmental and social-emotional concerns in young children from birth to age 5. Topics include communicating with families; referring for educational and medical evaluation; sharing evaluation results, including information about confidentiality and consent; and shared care planning. A link to a map of trained mental health professionals and a graphic showing a communication feedback loop are included.

Contact: Minnesota Department of Health, Child and Teen Checkups Program, P.O. Box 64882, St. Paul, MN 55164-0882, Telephone: (651) 201-3760 E-mail: health.childandteencheckups@state.mn.us Web Site: http://www.health.state.mn.us/divs/cfh/program/ctc Available from the website.

Keywords: Child development, Clinics, Communication, Confidentiality, Early childhood, Early intervention, Emotional development, Family support, Legal issues, Mental health, Parent consent, Planning, Psychosocial development, Referrals, Role, School districts, Schools, Screening, Young children

Chazin S. 2015. Engaging schools to support better oral health for low-income children. Hamilton, NJ: Center for Health Care Strategies, 7 pp.

Annotation: This brief describes the role that school-based oral health programs can play in addressing access to oral health care for children and adolescents from families with low incomes. It highlights opportunities for state Medicaid agencies and public health programs to support school-based efforts to improve oral health among students. Contents include an overview of school-based oral health programs, a discussion of how to engage school decision-makers and other key stakeholders in advancing school-based oral health, and information about challenges and considerations related to working to engage schools and students and their families in oral health.

Contact: Center for Health Care Strategies, 200 American Metro Boulevard, Suite 119, Hamilton, NJ 08619, Telephone: (609) 528-8400 Fax: (609) 586-3679 E-mail: Web Site: http://www.chcs.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Access to health care, Adolescents, Children, Health care utilization, Low income groups, Medicaid, Oral health, Program improvement, Program planning, Quality assurance, School based clinics, School health programs, School health services, School role, Schools, State programs, Students

U.S. Department of Labor, Office of Disability Employment Policy. 2015. Healthy transitions: A pathway to employment for youth with chronic health conditions and other disabilities. Washington, DC: U.S. Department of Labor, Office of Disability Employment Policy, 12 pp.

Annotation: This policy brief presents research findings about the relationship between disability (including chronic conditions), health and wellness, and transition and employment outcomes for youth with disabilities. The brief also examines the role health care professionals play in establishing employment expectations. Contents include information about the study methods, transition planning, and recommendations.

Contact: U.S. Department of Labor, Office of Disability Employment Policy, Frances Perkins Building, 200 Constitution Avenue, N.W., Washington, DC 20210, Telephone: (202) 693-7880 Secondary Telephone: (866) 633-7365 Fax: (202) 693-7888 E-mail: infoDEP@dol.gov Web Site: http://www.dol.gov/odep Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent health, Chronic illnesses and disabilities, Employment, Outcome and process assessment, Role, School to work transitions, Transition planning, Young adults

Braff-Guajardo E, Hecht K. 2015. Kids and drinking water: A glass half full or half empty?. Washington, DC: Grantmakers In Health, 3 pp. (Views from the field)

Annotation: This paper discusses the importance of children drinking water. Contents include information about the importance of water consumption in preventing chronic disease; obstacles to ensuring that students have access to clean, safe drinking water in schools; drinking water challenges in communities; and opportunities for health funders to increase children’s access to and consumption of free, safe drinking water. Topics include improving access, prioritizing education, funding data collection and research, promoting multisectoral partnerships, and advocating for supportive policies. A policy framework to support healthy development in all children by investing in accessible, safe drinking water is included. .

Contact: Grantmakers In Health, 1100 Connecticut Avenue, N.W., Suite 1200, Washington, DC 20036-4101, Telephone: (202) 452-8331 Fax: (202) 452-8340 Web Site: http://www.gih.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Advocacy, Child health, Child safety, Community role, Environmental health, Environmental pollution, Financing, Fluid intake, Health promotion, Low income groups, Minority groups, Nutrition, Policy development, Public private partnerships, School role, Water

National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion. 2015. Comprehensive framework for addressing the school nutrition environment and services. Atlanta, GA: National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, 8 pp.

Annotation: This document describes components of the school nutrition environment and resources to support a healthy school nutrition environment. Topics include school meals, smart snacks in school; in-school fundraisers; classroom celebrations, events, and nonfood rewards; access to drinking water; staff role modeling; food and beverage marketing; and healthy eating learning opportunities.

Contact: National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 1600 Clifton Road, Atlanta, GA 30329-4027, Telephone: (800) 232-4636 Secondary Telephone: (888) 232-6348 E-mail: cdcinfo@cdc.gov Web Site: http://www.cdc.gov/nccdphp Available from the website.

Keywords: Fluid intake, Food consumption, Health policy, Health promotion, Learning, Marketing, Models, Nutrition, Policy development, Role models, School health services, Schools, Snacks, Water

ASCD. 2014. Whole school whole community whole child: A collaborative approach to learning and health. Alexandria, VA: ASCD, 13 pp.

Annotation: This document presents a model for collaboration and action across communities, across schools, and across sectors to meet the needs and reach the potential of each child. Topics include the need for greater alignment, integration, and collaboration between education and health to improve each child's cognitive, physical, social, and emotional development; combining and building on elements of the traditional coordinated school health approach and the whole child framework; and developing joint or collaborative policies, processes, and practices.

Contact: ASCD, 1703 North Beauregard Street, Alexandria, VA 22311-1714, Telephone: (703) 578-9600 Secondary Telephone: (800) 933+2723 Fax: (703) 575-5400 E-mail: member@ascd.org Web Site: http://www.ascd.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Collaboration, Community role, Educational reform, Government role, Health status, Learning, Models, Multidisciplinary teams, National initiatives, Policy development, School age children, School role, Service integration

Child Trends. 2014. Making the grade: Assessing the evidence for integrated student supports. Bethesda, MD: Child Trends, 133 pp.

Annotation: This report examines, from multiple perspectives, integrated student supports (ISS) as a strategy to address disparities in educational attainment and achievement. The report defines ISS as a school-based approach to promoting students' academic achievement and educational attainment by coordinating a seamless system of wraparound supports at multiple levels that target students academic and non-academic barriers to learning. Topics include models developed by practitioners in communities, research on child development, research on education, as well as evaluation studies. The report triangulates these knowledge bases to assess where the ISS field is and the evidence base that underlies the approach. Next steps and implications for research and evaluation are included.

Contact: Child Trends, 7315 Wisconsin Avenue, Suite 1200 W, Bethesda, MD 20814, Telephone: (240) 223-9200 E-mail: Web Site: http://www.childtrends.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Academic achievement, After school programs, Barriers, Community role, Education, Educational attainment, Integrated services, Learning, School health education, School health programs, School health services, School role, School safety

Morgan E, Salomon N, Plotkin M, Cohen R. 2014. The school discipline consensus report: Strategies from the field to keep students engaged in school and out of the juvenile justice system. Lexington, KY: Council of State Governments, 436 pp.

Annotation: This report presents strategies to support educators and minimize school systems' dependence on suspension, expulsion, and arrest to manage student behaviors while promoting safe and productive learning environments that improve academic outcomes for all students and reduce their involvement in the juvenile justice system. Topics include conditions for learning, targeted behavioral interventions, school-police partnerships, courts and juvenile justice, information sharing, and data collection.

Contact: Council of State Governments, 2760 Research Park Drive, P. O. Box 11910, Lexington, KY 40578-1910, Telephone: (859) 244-8000 Secondary Telephone: (800) 800-1910 Fax: (859) 244-8001 E-mail: csg@csg.org Web Site: http://www.csg.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Behavior problems, Collaboration, Criminal justice system, Discipline, Juvenile justice, Learning, Policy development, Prevention programs, Public private partnerships, Risk factors, School age children, School attendance, School failure, School role, School safety, Students, Systems development

ASCD, Whole Child. 2014. Whole child snapshots: Measuring whole child success across the states. Alexandria, VA: ASCD, multiple items.

Annotation: These resources highlight how well each state and the nation are meeting the comprehensive needs of children. The snapshots feature data aligned with the following five tenets: healthy, safe, engaged, supported, and challenged. Together, the data provide a picture of child well-being and suggest ideas for how communities can make targeted and innovative improvements to support the potential of students and prepare them for lifelong learning, career success, and active citizenship. In addition to individualized state data, the snapshots also provide notable national data highlights.

Contact: ASCD, 1703 North Beauregard Street, Alexandria, VA 22311-1714, Telephone: (703) 578-9600 Secondary Telephone: (800) 933+2723 Fax: (703) 575-5400 E-mail: member@ascd.org Web Site: http://www.ascd.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Academic achievement, Collaboration, Community role, Data, Health care utilization, Health status, Life course, Participation, Program coordination, Safety, School age children, Students

U.S. Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration. 2013. Community conversations about mental health. Rockville, MD: Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, 4 items.

Annotation: These resources support the national dialogue and build awareness about mental illness in communities. Contents include an information brief (in English and Spanish), a discussion guide, and a planning guide. Topics include basic facts about mental health and mental illness, as well as information on the causes of mental illness and how families, schools, and communities can best treat and respond to it. Additional topics include promoting mental health and preventing mental illness, addressing public attitudes, evidence-based practices for treatment, and recovery support services. Suggestions for community planning, terms and definitions, and resources and websites are included.

Contact: U.S. Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, One Choke Cherry Road, Rockville, MD 20857, Telephone: (877) SAMHSA-7 Secondary Telephone: (877) 726-4727 E-mail: Web Site: http://www.samhsa.gov Available from the website. Document Number: SM13-4763.

Keywords: Communication, Community health services, Community participation, Community role, Families, Mental health, Public awareness campaigns, Schools, Spanish language materials

Levin M, Neuberger Z. 2013. Community eligibility: Making high-poverty schools hunger free. Washington, DC: Food Action and Research Center, Center on Budget and Policy Priorities, 38 pp.

Annotation: This paper provides information on the concept of community eligibility in making it easier for low-income children in high-poverty schools to get free meals. It describes how community eligibility works, presents data on its impact, and lists resources on best practices for implementing the option.

Contact: Food Research and Action Center, 1875 Connecticut Avenue, N.W., Suite 540, Washington, DC 20009, Telephone: (202) 986-2200 Fax: (202) 986-2525 Web Site: http://www.frac.org/ Available from the website.

Keywords: Child nutrition, Children, Community role, Eligibility determination, Hunger, Low income groups, School breakfast programs, School lunch programs

Kohl III HW, Cook HD, eds.; Institute of Medicine, Committee on Physical Activity and Physical Education in the School Environment. 2013. Educating the student body: Taking physical activity and physical education to school. Washington, DC: National Academies Press, 488 pp.

Annotation: This report makes recommendations about approaches for strengthening and improving programs and policies for physical activity and physical education in the school environment. The report, which lays out a set of guiding principles for accomplishing this task, covers the following topics: (1) the status and trends of physical activity behaviors in the United States and related school policies; (2) health, developmental, academic, and cognitive outcomes associated with physical activity and physical education; (3) an overview and discussion of physical education programs in schools, including what a high-quality program looks like; (4) an overview and discussion of physical activity programs in schools; and (5) evidence for the effectiveness of physical activity and physical education programs and policies.

Contact: National Academies Press, 500 Fifth Street, N.W., Keck 360, Washington, DC 20001, Telephone: (202) 334-3313 Secondary Telephone: (888) 624-8373 Fax: (202) 334-2451 E-mail: customer_service@nap.edu Web Site: http://www.nap.edu $59.00 plus shipping and handling; also available from the website. Document Number: ISBN 978-0-309-28313-7.

Keywords: Adolescent development, Adolescent health, Child development, Child health, Cognitive development, Educational attainment, Physical activity, Physical education, Programs, Public policy, Research, School health, School role, Trends

Alliance for a Healthier Generation. 2013. School wellness committee toolkit. New York, NY: Alliance for a Healthier Generation, 23 pp.

Annotation: This guide was created as a resource for school wellness committees (SWCs) to convene, plan, and implement their action plans. Contents include information on how to use the toolkit, what a SWC is, frequently asked questions, roles and responsibilities, talking points for schools (why health?), and a framework of best practices criteria. Additional contents include guidance on who should join the SWC, considerations for SWC members, involving students and families, talking points about the Healthy Schools Program, a sample invitation letter, making decisions, how to keep SWCs active and effective, support and matrix for success, role of the facilitator, managing difficult behavior in groups, creating group norms, and communication strategies.

Contact: Alliance for a Healthier Generation, c/o The Clinton Foundation, 1271 Avenue of the Americas, 42nd Floor, New York, NY 10020, Telephone: (888) KID-HLTH E-mail: info@HealthierGeneration.org Web Site: https://www.healthiergeneration.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Advisory committees, Decision making, Facilitated communication, Policy development, Program development, Program planning, Role, School health, School health programs, Schools

Coburn-Snyder H, ed. 2012. Family services school community tool kit [rev. ed.]. New York, NY: Autism Speaks, 106 pp.

Annotation: This toolkit is designed to assist families of children with autism and members of the school community in understanding and supporting students with autism. It offers an introduction to physical, medical, and other challenges for children with autism or Asperger's Syndrome; information for the many types of school service personnel; educating students with autism; and supporting learning in the student with autism. Resources and appendices include web, print, and video resources.

Contact: Autism Speaks, 1 East 33rd Street, Fourth Floor, New York, NY 10016, Telephone: (212) 252-8584 Fax: (212) 252-8676 E-mail: contactus@autismspeaks.org Web Site: http://www.autismspeaks.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Autism, Children with special health care needs, Community role, Family support services, Resources for professionals, School health, School personnel, Special education, Students

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This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number U02MC31613, MCH Advanced Education Policy, $3.5 M. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.