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Strengthening the evidence for maternal and child health programs

Search Results: MCHLine

Items in this list may be obtained from the sources cited. Contact information reflects the most current data about the source that has been provided to the MCH Digital Library.


Displaying records 1 through 16 (16 total).

Rhode Island Department of Elementary and Secondary Education and Department of Health. 2016. Rhode Island school health manual model guidelines. Providence, RI: Rhode Island Department of Elementary and Secondary Education and Department of Health, 12 pp.

Annotation: This manual for school nurses and other school health personnel provides recommendations, resources, and guidelines for coordinated school health practice and programs throughout Rhode Island. Topics include the role of the school nurse and school administrator; state statutes, regulations, and requirements; health services including dental screenings; and healthful school environment including statewide bullying policy.

Keywords: Guidelines, Models, Program coordination, Rhode Island, Role, School health programs, School health services, School nursing, School safety

Martinez A. 2016. School attendance, chronic health conditions and leveraging data for improvement: Recommendations for state education and health departments to address student absenteeism. Atlanta, GA: National Association of Chronic Disease Directors, 23 pp.

Annotation: This document for state education and health departments focuses on ways state school nurse consultants and other state school health personnel can support schools in reducing absences for students with chronic health conditions. Topics include the context and definitions of attendance as a measure, national efforts aimed at improving school attendance, challenges and opportunities related to collecting and using data on school attendance and chronic health conditions, collecting causes of school absence including chronic conditions, and recommendations for connecting school attendance and chronic health conditions to address absenteeism. Examples from Connecticut, Kentucky, and Massachusetts are included.

Contact: National Association of Chronic Disease Directors, 2200 Century Parkway, Suite 250, Atlanta, GA 30345, Telephone: (770) 458-7400 Web Site: https://chronicdisease.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Chronic illnesses and disabilities, Community action, Data analysis, Data collection, Leadership, Management information systems, Measures, Nursing, Program improvement, School attendance, School health services, School nurses, Schools, State departments of education, State health agencies, Students

Martinez A. 2016. Opportunities for school and hospital partnership in the management of chronic health conditions. Atlanta, GA; National Association of Chronic Disease Directors, 23 pp.

Annotation: This brief for state health departments highlights examples of school and hospital partnerships to improve children's health, and how state school health and nursing service personnel can support their collaboration. Topics include the importance of school and hospital partnership in managing chronic health conditions in schools, how health department involvement in a hospital community health needs assessment process can help to strengthen school and hospital partnership, and opportunities to strengthen school and hospital partnership through Medicaid. Additional contents include examples of school and hospital partnership in Massachusetts, Ohio, and Texas; and descriptions of key resources.

Contact: National Association of Chronic Disease Directors, 2200 Century Parkway, Suite 250, Atlanta, GA 30345, Telephone: (770) 458-7400 Web Site: https://chronicdisease.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Chronic illnesses and disabilities, Collaboration, Disease management, Hospitals, Medicaid, Needs assessment, Nursing, Public private partnerships, Reimbursement, Resources for professionals, School health services, Schools, State health agencies, State programs, Students

National Association of School Nurses and National Association of State School Nurse Consultants. 2016. National school nurse standardized data set: Step Up & Be Counted!. Silver Spring, MD: National Association of School Nurses, 2 pp.

Annotation: This document describes a project to collect and report population-level data to support the health of school-aged children and the impact of school nursing. Topics include data points; the process of developing a uniform data set, and data use. Step Up & Be Counted! was a 3-year data initiative (2014-2016) that was a joint venture between NASN and the National Association of State School Nurse consultants. The National Uniform School Nurse Data Set was created with 15 data elements, and data was collected from 39 states, some with 1 school district reporting and other states with 100% of the schools reporting data into a national data portal. It has been succeeded by a new initiative called "National School Health Data Set: Every Student Counts!".

Contact: National Association of School Nurses, 1100 Wayne Avenue, Suite 925, Silver Spring, MD 20910, Telephone: (240) 821-1130 Secondary Telephone: (866) 627-6767 Fax: (301) 585-1791 E-mail: nasn@nasn.org Web Site: http://www.nasn.org Out of print.

Keywords: Data collection, Program descriptions, School aged children, School based management, School health, School health services, School nursing, Students

Martinez AK. 2015. State health department leadership in addressing chronic health conditions in schools: Case studies from Massachusetts and Missouri. Atlanta, GA: National Association of Chronic Disease Directors, 25 pp.

Annotation: These case studies highlight the work and accomplishments of state health agencies in Massachusetts and Missouri related to addressing chronic health conditions in the school environment. Topics include collaborating with health and education partners; strengthening school nursing infrastructure and health services, including oral health services; identifying and tracking students with chronic health conditions; and meeting management and care needs of students with chronic health conditions.

Contact: National Association of Chronic Disease Directors, 2200 Century Parkway, Suite 250, Atlanta, GA 30345, Telephone: (770) 458-7400 Web Site: https://chronicdisease.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Case studies, Chronic illnesses and disabilities, Collaboration, Disease management, Massachusetts, Missouri, Public health infrastructure, School age children, School health services, School nursing, Schools, Special health care needs, State health agencies

Missouri Department of Health and Senior Services, Oral Health Program. 2014. Dental health guide for school nurses. Jefferson City, MO: Missouri Department of Health and Senior Services, 11 pp.

Annotation: This booklet is designed to aid school nurses in the effective treatment of minor oral health emergencies. Topics include dental first aid supplies; inflamed or irritated gum tissue, fever blisters, cold sores, and canker sores; toothache; prolonged or recurrent bleeding after an extraction; broken or displaced tooth; traumatic avulsion (tooth knocked out of socket); possible jaw dislocation or fracture; orthodontic problems and emergencies; objects wedged between teeth; lacerated lip or tongue; and tooth eruption pain. Information about the eruption and shedding of primary (baby) teeth and primary and permanent dentition eruption tables are also provided.

Contact: Missouri Department of Health and Senior Services, Oral Health Program, P.O. Box 570, Jefferson City, MO 65102-0570, Telephone: (573) 751-6400 Fax: (573) 751-6010 E-mail: info@health.mo.gov Web Site: http://health.mo.gov/living/families/oralhealth/index.php Available from the website.

Keywords: Emergency medical services, First aid, Nursing, Oral health, School age children, Schools

Baker D, Davis-Aldritt L, Hebbeler K. 2014. The 'hidden health care system' in California schools and children with special health care needs. Palo Alto, CA: Lucile Packard Foundation for Children's Health, 3 items. (School health and children with special health care needs)

Annotation: These fact sheets present policy recommendations to improve the health care system in schools in California. The content draws from 2011-2012 state education data, interviews with school education experts, and a survey of school nurses. Topics include issues in identifying children with special health care needs at school, who is caring for them at school, and accessing available funds for school-based health services.

Contact: Lucile Packard Foundation for Children's Health, 400 Hamilton Avenue, Suite 340, Palo Alto, CA 94301, Telephone: (650) 497-8365 E-mail: info@lpfch.org Web Site: http://www.lpfch.org Available from the website.

Keywords: California, Children with special health care needs, Financing, Health care systems, Nursing, Policy development, Program improvement, School age children, School health

Wisconsin Public Health Association and Medical College of Wisconsin. 2014. WISHeS: Wisconsin Improving School Health Services Project. Kimberly, WI: Wisconsin Public Health Association, multiple items.

Annotation: This manual is designed to help school districts improve the health services they provide to students. Contents include a school-health-services assessment tool; injury and illness protocols; sample policies and procedures for emergency nursing services, concussion management, managing and preventing acute reactions to foods in the school setting, and medication administration; and nurse procedures. The manual also contains instructions for unlicensed assistive personnel on hand hygiene, oral care, feeding, transfers, and diapering for students who need such care at school.

Contact: Wisconsin Public Health Association, 563 Carter Court, Suite B, Kimberly, WI 54136, Telephone: (920) 882-3650 Contact Phone: (414) 875-7257 E-mail: WPHA@badgerbay.co Contact E-mail: teresa@badgerbay,co Web Site: http://www.wpha.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Assessment, Disease management, Disease prevention, Mobile applications, Nursing services, Oral health, Patient care management, Patient care planning, Protocols, School based management, School districts, School health services, School nurses, School personnel, Special health care needs, Training

Illinois Emergency Medical Services for Children. 2010. Guidelines for the nurse in the school setting: School nurse emergency care course. [Maywood, IL]: Illinois Emergency Medical Services for Children, 108 pp.

Annotation: This document provides nurses working in school settings with a set of emergency care guidelines that they can use when delivering care to ill or injured students. The document discusses pediatric educational recommendations for health professionals, assessment, and triage. Detailed protocols for managing a wide variety or emergencies are presented. [Funded in part by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: Illinois Emergency Medical Services for Children, Loyola University Medical Center, Building 110 Lower Level, 2160 South First Avenue, Maywood, IL 60153, Telephone: (708) 327-3672 Secondary Telephone: (708) 327-2556 Fax: (708) 327-2548 E-mail: Evelyn.Lyons@illinois.gov Web Site: http:/www.luhs.org/emsc Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent health, Assessment, Child health, Emergencies, Emergency medical services, Nursing education, School health services, School nurses, Training, Triage

U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Federal Interagency Ad Hoc Committee on Health Promotion Through the Schools. 1992-. Healthy schools: A directory of federal programs and activities related to health promotion through the schools. Washington, DC: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Public Health Service, annual.

Annotation: This directory lists 112 federal programs and 35 federally supported clearinghouses and information centers whose activities are relevant to school health. Each entry provides information on the area of emphasis, target groups, program profile, materials, and information contact.

Contact: U.S. Office of Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, 1101 Wootton Parkway, Suite LL100, Rockville, MD 20852, Fax: (240) 453-8282 E-mail: odphpinfo@hhs.gov Web Site: https://health.gov Available in libraries.

Keywords: Adolescents, Alcohol use, Child development, Child nutrition, Children, Clearinghouses, Comprehensive programs, Counseling, Curricula, Driver education, Federal government, Federal programs, Health and safety education, Health promotion, Media campaigns, Nutrition programs, Physical fitness, Resources for professionals, Safety, School based clinics, School counseling, School health, School health programs, School health services, School nursing, Substance abuse, Training, Workplace health promotion

Children's Hospital, Boston, Project School Care. 1992. Working toward a balance in our lives: A booklet for families of children with disabilities and special health care needs. Boston, MA: Children's Hospital, Project School Care, 90 pp.

Annotation: This booklet is designed to help parents of children with special health needs deal with their children's experiences in the hospital, at home, and at school. It was developed by a group of parents and staff of Project School Care, a program at Children's Hospital, Boston. Project School Care was established to foster educational opportunities for children with special health needs, particularly those assisted by medical technology. The booklet discusses the hospital experience, common questions after hospitalization, home care, home nursing, respite care, financing health care, equipment, education, vocational training and planning for adulthood, recreation and travel, and record keeping. Appendices include a list of resource organizations, suggested readings, and a glossary. The booklet was supported by grants from the U.S. Maternal and Child Health Bureau and the Charles A. Lindbergh Fund. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Keywords: Adolescents with special health care needs, Children with special health care needs, Education, Home care, Nursing, Parenting, Respite care, School health services, Vocational rehabilitation

University of Delaware, College of Nursing, Tri-Regional Education and Networking Development Systems Project. 1989. The public health nurse consultant role and the contemporary health care delivery system. Newark, DE: University of Delaware, 244 pp.

Annotation: This collection of monographs are an outgrowth of a series of continuing education programs for state level public health nurse consultants in Department of Health and Human Services Regions I, II and III. Areas covered include the maternal and child health care delivery system, the nurse consultant's role, and specific issues related to prenatal care, reproductive ethics, ethics in the nursing curriculum, adolescent health, school-based clinics, and home care case management for the medically fragile child. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: Maternal and Child Health Library at Georgetown University, Telephone: (202) 784-9770 E-mail: mchgroup@georgetown.edu Web Site: https://www.mchlibrary.org Available from the website. Document Number: HRSA Info. Ctr. MCHC092.

Keywords: Child health, Health services, Maternal health, Nurses, Nursing, Public health, School based clinics

Sherwen LN. 1988. The maternal-infant core competency project regional conferences. Rockville, MD: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Division of Maternal and Child Health, 101 pp.

Annotation: The intended audience of this program is nurse educators, academic administrators, practicing nurses, nursing administrators, and inservice educators. This project included a survey of nursing education programs to find which programs included maternal and infant nursing competencies, and then to develop strategies for incorporating these areas into other nursing education programs. This volume discusses competency statements for baccalaureate graduates in maternal-infant nursing, how maternity nursing is taught in the baccalaureate curriculum, and provides a checklist for the presence of maternal-infant core competencies in baccalaureate nursing. A related title, "The Maternal-Infant Core Competency Project: Proceedings of Regional Conferences," describes the project outcomes and contains the proceedings to three regional conferences. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: March of Dimes, 1275 Mamaroneck Avenue, White Plains, NY 10605, Telephone: (914) 997-4488 Secondary Telephone: Web Site: http://www.marchofdimes.com Available in libraries.

Keywords: Conferences, Infant health, Maternal health, Nursing education, Nursing schools, Professional education

Derwinski-Robinson B, Monsen R, Sherwen LN, eds. 1988. The maternal-infant core competency project: Proceedings of regional conferences. Rockville, MD: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Division of Maternal and Child Health, 99 pp.

Annotation: The intended audience of this program is nurse educators, academic administrators, practicing nurses, nursing administrators, and inservice educators. This project includes a survey of of nursing education programs to find which programs included maternal and infant nursing competencies, and then to develop strategies for incorporating these areas into nursing education programs. This volume summarizes the project outcomes and the three MICC regional conferences. A related volume, "The Maternal-Infant Core Competency Project Regional Conferences," provides background materials. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: March of Dimes, 1275 Mamaroneck Avenue, White Plains, NY 10605, Telephone: (914) 997-4488 Secondary Telephone: Web Site: http://www.marchofdimes.com Available from the website.

Keywords: Conferences, Infant health, Maternal health, Nursing education, Nursing schools, Professional education

National Association of School Nurses. 1985. An evaluation guide for school nursing practice designed for self and peer review. Kent, OH: American School Health Association, 16 pp.

Annotation: This evaluation guide provides a mechanism for school nurses to use when evaluating their services or those of other school nurses. It is based on the Standards of School Nursing Practice which is a model of desired school nursing competencies.

Contact: American School Health Association, 7918 Jones Branch Drive, Suite 300, McLean, VA 22102, Telephone: (703) 506-7675 Contact Phone: (216) 678-1601 Fax: (703) 506-3266 E-mail: info@ashaweb.org Web Site: http://www.ashaweb.org $4.95 members, $5.95 nonmembers; plus $3.00 shipping and handling.

Keywords: Evaluation, School nurses, School nursing, Standards

Macdonough GP, Hertel V, Hutchison R, Lordi S, Stade C, Thelander E, Wood J. 1983. Standards of school nursing practice. Kansas City, MO: American Nurses' Association, 20 pp.

Annotation: This document provides standards of practice for school nursing. It is designed to stimulate the development of peer review, guarantee the documentation of the benefits and outcomes of school nursing practice, inspire research to validate practice, and generate research questions that lead to improvement of the health delivery system to students and families. The rationale is provided for each standard, and criteria are developed to measure each standard. This document was developed by the Task Force on Standards of School Nursing Practice.

Contact: American School Health Association, 7918 Jones Branch Drive, Suite 300, McLean, VA 22102, Telephone: (703) 506-7675 Contact Phone: (216) 678-1601 Fax: (703) 506-3266 E-mail: info@ashaweb.org Web Site: http://www.ashaweb.org $4.95 members, $5.95 nonmembers; plus $3.00 shipping and handling.

Keywords: School health, School nurses, School nursing, Standards

   

This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number U02MC31613, MCH Advanced Education Policy, $3.5 M. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.