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Strengthening the evidence for maternal and child health programs

Search Results: MCHLine

Items in this list may be obtained from the sources cited. Contact information reflects the most current data about the source that has been provided to the MCH Digital Library.


Displaying records 1 through 20 (67 total).

Barzel R, Holt K, eds. 2019. Promoting oral health in schools: A resource guide (4th ed.). Washington, DC: National Maternal and Child Oral Health Resource Center, 35 pp.

Annotation: This guide provides resources to help health professionals, program administrators, educators, parents, and others promote oral health and prevent oral disease in school-age children and adolescents. The guide is divided into two sections. The first section describes materials such as brochures, fact sheets, guidelines, curricula, and reports. The second section lists federal agencies, national professional associations, resource centers, and national coalitions that may serve as resources. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Maternal and Child Oral Health Resource Center, Georgetown University, Box 571272, Washington, DC 20057-1272, Telephone: (202) 784-9771 E-mail: OHRCinfo@georgetown.edu Web Site: https://www.mchoralhealth.org Available from the website.

Keywords: , Disease prevention, Health promotion, Oral health, Resources for professionals, School age children, School health services, School linked programs, Young children

Oral Health Colorado. 2015. Smart mouths, smart kids: Improving dental health for Colorado students. Nederland, CO: Oral Health Colorado, 1 v.

Annotation: This toolkit provides information and resources on assessing the feasibility of initiating school- linked oral health services and designing and building a sustainable school oral health pro- gram. Contents include resources for generating ideas, assessing community needs, creating a budget, developing a business plan, providing a rationale for activities, framing an idea, build- ing a program, and maintaining and sustaining a successful school oral health program. The toolkit also includes a data application (a targeted and focused electronic health record) that can be used to monitor children’s oral health status over time.

Contact: Oral Health Colorado, P.O. Box 1335, Nederland, CO 80466, Telephone: (303) 258-3339 E-mail: deborah@oralhealthcolorado.org Web Site: http://www.oralhealthcolorado.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Access to health care, Barriers, Colorado, Community based services, Dental care, Low income groups, Minority groups, Oral health, Preventive health services, Relationships, Rural population, School aged children, School linked programs, State programs, Sustainability

Georgia Department of Human Resources, Family Health Branch, Oral Health Section. 2014. Georgia Oral Health Prevention Program: Reaching Georgia's children where they learn—Parents' guide. Atlanta, GA: Georgia Department of Human Resources, Oral Health Section, 2 pp.

Annotation: This brochure for parents describes oral health services available to students from families with low incomes who attend schools in Georgia. It discusses program goals, outlines services, and provides tips on the importance of oral health screening and education, as well as nutrition and overall health.

Contact: Georgia Department of Public Health, Oral Health Program, Two Peachtree Street, N.W., 11th Floor, Atlanta, GA 30303-3186, Telephone: (404) 657-2850 Web Site: https://dph.georgia.gov/oral-health-program Available from the website.

Keywords: Children, Dental sealants, Fluorides, Georgia, Low income groups, Mobile health units, Oral health, Preventive health services, Referrals, School based clinics, School health programs, School linked programs, Screening, State programs

Center for Mental Health in Schools. 2014. Integrated student supports and equity: What's not being discussed. Los Angeles, CA: Center for Mental Health in Schools, 6 pp.

Annotation: Connecting school, home, and community resources is essential to the well-being of children and youth and to enhancing equity of opportunity for them to succeed at school and beyond. With this in mind, many initiatives and policy reports have focused on addressing the widespread fragmentation of supports for families and their children. Considerable policy emphasis has centered on the notion of integrated student supports. While most of the discussion of integrated student supports is well-intentioned, the examples most frequently cited have little chance of enhancing equity of opportunity for students across the country. Moreover, as practiced, serious unintended negative consequences have been observed. This set of policy notes stresses the need and directions for moving forward.

Contact: Center for Mental Health in Schools, UCLA School Mental Health Project, Box 951563, Los Angeles, CA 90095-1563, Telephone: (310) 825-3634 Secondary Telephone: (866) 846-4843 Fax: (310) 206-8716 E-mail: smhp@ucla.edu Web Site: http://smhp.psych.ucla.edu Available from the website.

Keywords: Barriers, Community coordination, Equal opportunities, Health care systems, Intervention, Learning, School linked programs, Service integration, Students, Teaching

Center for Mental Health in Schools. 2014. Education leaders' guide to transforming student and learning supports. Los Angeles, CA: Center for Mental Health in Schools, 26 pp.

Stark Rentner D, Acosta Price O. 2014. A guide to federal education programs that can fund K-12 universal prevention and social and emotional learning activities. Washington, DC: Center for Health and Health Care in Schools and Center on Education Policy, 39 pp.

Center for Health and Health Care in Schools. 2014. The impact of school-connected behavioral and emotional health interventions on student academic performance: An annotated bibliography of research literature. Washington, DC: Center for Health and Health Care in Schools, 11 pp.

Carr D, Modzeleski B. 2014. How schools work and how to work with schools: A primer for those who want to serve children and youth in schools. Arlington, VA: National Association of State Boards of Education, 61 pp.

Toldson IA, Manekin SD. 2014. Building bridges: Connecting out-of-school time to classroom success among school-age Black males in the District of Columbia. Washington, DC: D.C. Children and Youth Investment Trust Corporation, 74 pp.

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Office for State, Tribal, Local, and Territorial Support. 2014. Bronx Teens Connections' Clinic Linkage Model: Connecting young people with clinical sexual and reproductive health services. Atlanta, GA: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Office for State, Tribal, Local, and Territorial Support, 2 pp. (Public health practice stories from the field)

Annotation: This document describes the Bronx Teens Connection (BxTC) program of the New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene, a multicomponent initiative to reduce pregnancy rates among adolescent and young adult females ages 15-19. Contents include information on program activities, accomplishments, and lessons learned. Topics include establishing formal linkages between clinics and schools or youth-serving organizations, connecting youth to high-quality clinical sexual health services.

Contact: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Office for State, Tribal, Local, and Territorial Support, 4770 Buford Highway, N.E., Mailstop E-70, Atlanta, GA 30341, E-mail: cdcinfo@cdc.gov Web Site: http://www.cdc.gov/stltpublichealth Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent pregnancy, Clinics, Health services delivery, Local MCH programs, Model programs, Prevention programs, Reproductive health, School linked programs, Sexual health, Urban population

D'Angelo AV, Rich L, Kwiatt J. 2013. Integrating family support services into schools: Lessons from the Elev8 Initiative. Chicago, IL: Chapin Hall, 8 pp. (Issue brief)

Annotation: This issue brief uses data from Chapin Hall’s evaluation of the Elev8 Full-Service Schools Initiative as a case study to focus on the challenges and benefits of offering economic support services to low income families at schools. Based on their findings, the authors conclude that the Elev8 Initiative, which brings together schools, families, and the community in underserved neighborhoods, shows promise as a way to provide support services to families while improving the educational opportunities for their children. Using lessons learned from the Eval8 Initiativ, the authors present recommendations for future efforts to integrate economic support services into schools. Their suggested strategies include hiring long-term staff members to build trusting relationships with parents; offering economic support services in conjunction with a broader array of services; ensuring clear lines of communication between partner organizations; and taking steps to ensure parents’ privacy.

Contact: Chapin Hall at the University of Chicago, 1313 East 60th Street, Chicago, IL 60637, Telephone: (773) 753-5900 Fax: (773) 753-5940 Web Site: http://www.chapinhall.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Community based services, Economic factors, Educational factors, Evaluation, High risk children, Initiatives, Low income groups, Models, Partnerships, School-linked programs

Masiello MG, Schroeder D. 2013. A public health approach to bullying prevention. Washington, DC: American Public Health Association, 355 pp.

Annotation: This book presents a public health approach to bullying prevention for parents and professionals looking for advice on specific facets of school-based bullying. The book focuses on public health strategies to provide a scientific approach to community planning, the use of evidence-based programs, coalition development, and the ability to change the culture in a school and community to one that is positive and strong. Topics include social and mental health consequences of bullying; practical implications for school administrators; health consequences; creating healthy school climates for lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgendered students; best practices; foundations of coalition building; community engagement; a call to action for schools and legislators; and program sustainability.

Contact: American Public Health Association, 800 I Street, N.W., Washington, DC 20001-3710, Telephone: (202) 777-2742 Secondary Telephone: Fax: (202) 777-2534 E-mail: comments@apha.org Web Site: http://www.apha.org $50 (non-members), plus shipping and handling. Document Number: ISBN 978-0-87553-203-5.

Keywords: Bullying, Community participation, Homosexuality, Mental health, Public health, School linked programs, School safety, Schools, Social factors, Students, Violence prevention

Sorace D. 2013. Addressing sexual health in schools: Policy considerations. Washington, DC: Advocates for Youth, 25 pp.

Annotation: This report provides research and best practices on policies that address adolescent sexual health in schools. It discusses the rationale for sexual health education and access to sexual and reproductive health services; explains why policy is important and describes policy parameters and the local policy process; and presents an overview of policy considerations related to sexual and reproductive health education and services. The report is intended to help guide educators, administrators, and advocates to assess the sexual health policies and practices in their states, school districts, and schools.

Contact: Advocates for Youth, 2000 M Street, N.W., Suite 750, Washington, DC 20036, Telephone: (202) 419-3420 Fax: (202) 419-1448 Web Site: http://www.advocatesforyouth.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Policy development, Reproductive health, School health, School health education, School linked programs, School services, Sexuality education

Wright TD, Zimmerman JB, Knott R. 2013. At the intersection: Connecting health and education data in school-based health centers. Lansing, MI: School-Community Health Alliance of Michigan, 39 pp.

Annotation: This report for communities provides guidance on the methods, challenges, and value of linking school based health center (SBHC) health- and education-related data. Contents include a series of case studies that provide lessons learned from SBHCs and schools (or school districts) that have successfully linked or made progress toward linking health and education-related data for students who used the SBHC. The report captures experiences of Cincinnati, East Baton Rouge, Miami-Dade County, and Seattle in linking complex data sets generated independently by school-based health centers and schools.

Contact: School-Community Health Alliance of Michigan, 6035 Executive Drive, Suite 103, Lansing, MI 48911, Telephone: (517) 908-0847 E-mail: mstrasz@scha-mi.org Web Site: http://scha-mi.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Barriers, Case studies, Data linkage, School age children, School based clinics, School districts, School linked programs, Schools

Behrens D, Lear JG. [2011]. Strengthening children's oral health: Views from the field. Washington, DC: Center for Health and Health Care in Schools, 13 pp.

Annotation: This document summarizes findings and conclusions from key-informant interviews to identify strategies for galvanizing efforts to improve the oral health of children from families with low incomes and who are members of minority groups. Contents include background on the problem, the research methodology, possible solutions, and related issues such as financing and outcome measures and accountability. Topics include barriers to preventive oral health services; access to oral health care, including school-connected oral health care; work force development; and service-delivery models.

Contact: Center for Health and Health Care in Schools, George Washington University Milken Institute School of Public Health, 2175 K Street, N.W., Suite 200, Room 213, Washington, DC 20037, Telephone: (202) 994-4895 E-mail: chhcs@gwu.edu Web Site: http://www.healthinschools.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Access to health care, Barriers, Children, Health services delivery, Low income groups, Minority groups, Oral health, Preventive health services, School based clinics, School linked programs, Work force

Lowe E, Holt K. 2011. Be an oral health champion: How school-based clinic staff can help students achieve good oral health. Washington, DC: National Maternal and Child Oral Health Resource Center, 4 pp.

Annotation: This document provides information that school-based clinic staff can use to help improve students’ oral health. The document offers tips for promoting oral health with students and parents, describes other problems that students with poor oral health may have, and offers tips for incorporating oral health into the school setting and for working with others in the community. The document emphasizes the important effect that staff can have on students’ lives by helping students achieve good oral health. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Maternal and Child Oral Health Resource Center, Georgetown University, Box 571272, Washington, DC 20057-1272, Telephone: (202) 784-9771 E-mail: OHRCinfo@georgetown.edu Web Site: https://www.mchoralhealth.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescents, Dental caries, Disease prevention, Oral health, School age children, School based clinics, School linked programs

Isman B. 2011. Mobile and portable dental services in preschool and school settings: Complex issues. Sparks, NV: Association of State and Territorial Dental Directors, 16 pp. (Issue brief)

Annotation: This brief highlights issues confronting communities and states providing oral health services in education settings using self-contained motorized mobile vans, nonmotorized mobile trailers, or portable dental equipment. Contents include background information on oral health services in preschools and schools and specific strategies to address key issues. Recommendations for action at the national, state, and local levels are included. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: Association of State and Territorial Dental Directors, 3858 Cashill Boulevard, Reno, NV 89509, Telephone: (775) 626-5008 Fax: (775) 626-9268 E-mail: info@astdd.org Web Site: http://www.astdd.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Barriers, Children, Dental care, Health services delivery, Mobile health units, Oral health, Preschool children, School age children, School linked programs

National Education Association Health Information Network. 2011. School crisis guide: Help and healing in a time of crisis. Washington, DC: National Education Association Health Information Network, 46 pp.

Annotation: This step-by-step guide provides schools and school districts a framework for planning and responding before, during, and after a crisis such as an earthquake or other natural disaster. Intended to help principals, school administrators, union leaders, and school personnel help keep schools safe by (1) creating an emergency preparedness and crisis response plan; (2) responding effectively and appropriately during a disaster; and (3) handling the crisis after the disaster has occurred. It offers guidelines on responding to long-term mental health care needs, handling donations, communications and media strategies, and evaluating the response. The guide also describes how crisis response teams organized by the National Education Association (NEA) can assist states in the aftermath of a traumatic event or emergency situation.

Contact: National Education Association Healthy Futures, 1201 16th Street, N.W., Suite 216, Washington, DC 20036-3290, Telephone: (202) 822-7570 Fax: (202) 822-7775 E-mail: info@neahealthyfutures.org Web Site: http://www.neahhealthyfutures.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Crisis, Disaster planning, Emergencies, School linked programs, School safety

Cuffe HE, Harbaugh WT, Lindo JM, Musto G, Waddell GR. 2011. Evidence on the efficacy of school-based incentives for healthy living. Cambridge, MA: National Bureau of Economic Research, 25 pp. (NBER working paper series no. 17478)

Annotation: This report analyzes the effects of a school-based incentive program developed to promote physical activity among school-aged children by encouraging them to walk or bike to school. The report summarizes research indicating how sedentary lifestyles contribute to poor health outcomes and highlights the absence of research studies that have focused on children's health behavior despite high levels of obesity among American youth. The report describes the design of the school-based incentive program; discusses the models used to measure the impacts of the program; and discusses the overall effects of prizes offered to encourage certain types of behavior during the program. Included is an empirical analysis of the findings and a summary of outcomes based on the age and gender of the participating children, as well as the time of year during which the children were encouraged to walk or bike to school. Tables indicate the extent to which various rewards impacted behavior outcomes.

Contact: National Bureau of Economic Research, 1050 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, MA 02138-5398, Telephone: (617) 868-3900 Fax: (617) 868-2742 E-mail: info@nber.org Web Site: http://www.nber.org Available from the website, after free registration.

Keywords: Behavior modification, Child behavior, Child health, Model programs, Physical activity, Prevention, Research, School linked programs

National School Boards Association. 2011. Families as partners: Fostering family engagement for health and successful students. Alexandria, VA: National School Boards Association, 11 pp.

Annotation: This paper provides an overview of family engagement as it relates to school health and student achievement. It discusses school health policies, practices, and strategies that school boards and public education administrators can use to effectively engage families. Sidebars provide inks to additional tools and resources such as sample family engagement policies, evidence-based practices, and family engagement surveys.

Contact: National School Boards Association, 1680 Duke Street, Alexandria, VA 22314, Telephone: (703) 838-6722 Fax: (703) 683-7590 E-mail: info@nsba.org Web Site: http://www.nsba.org

Keywords: Academic achievement, Education, Family school relations, Parent child relations, Parent participation, School health, School linked programs

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This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number U02MC31613, MCH Advanced Education Policy, $3.5 M. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.