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Strengthening the evidence for maternal and child health programs

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Items in this list may be obtained from the sources cited. Contact information reflects the most current data about the source that has been provided to the MCH Digital Library.


Displaying records 1 through 20 (502 total).

McIntire MS, Mitchell JR. n.d.. Comprehensive health care delivery for children and youth: A combined approach. Minneapolis, MN: [University of Minnesota, School of Public Health], Systems Development Project Staff, 7 pp. (Comment series no: 2-1 (41))

Annotation: This paper reports a Children and Youth Project conducted by combining the forces of a medical school and a health department, by maintaining role differentiation in respect to education and service, and by developing a Central Health Record and communication system to develop and increase comprehensive health services for children and youth residing in the target areas of poverty. This paper is produced as part of the documentation and assessment of the effect of P.L. 89-97, Title V. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Keywords: Adolescent health programs, Child health programs, Children and Youth Projects, Communication, Comprehensive health services, Interagency cooperation, Medical records, Medical schools, Poverty, Program evaluation, Public health agencies, Title V programs

Gedgoud JL, McIntire MS. n.d.. Progress report of a combined approach for children and youth services. Minneapolis, MN: [University of Minnesota, School of Public Health], Systems Development Project Staff, 11 pp. (Comment series no: 3-2 (45))

Annotation: This report demonstrates graphically how a combination of a health department and a medical school compress to the national average of all Children and Youth projects. This paper is produced as part of the documentation and assessment of the effect of P.L. 89-97, Title V. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Keywords: Adolescent health programs Comprehensive health services, Child health programs, Children and Youth Projects, Communication, Interagency cooperation, Medical records, Medical schools, Poverty, Program evaluation, Public health agencies, Title V programs

Miller S. n.d.. New Horizons in School Health [Final report]. Baltimore, MD: University of Maryland at Baltimore, 35 pp.

Annotation: The project provided training experiences to enable health professionals in schools to work together and with school colleagues to provide developmentally appropriate, comprehensive health care. This enhanced the healthy development and academic success of school children. Additionally, the project providef training ot enable school health professionals to serve as effective preceptors for future student professionals. Twenty Maryland schools with school-based health programs established interdisciplinary teams consisting of health and education professionals. Each school-based team identified a health need in its school and designed, implemented, and evaluated a team project. Process evaluation was implemented following key activities. Outcome evaluation focused on outcomes related to specific project objectives. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Technical Information Service, U.S. Department of Commerce, 5301 Shawnee Road, Alexandria, VA 22312, Telephone: (703) 605-6050 Secondary Telephone: (888) 584-8332 E-mail: customerservice@ntis.gov Web Site: http://www.ntis.gov Document Number: NTIS PB97-121974.

Keywords: Adolescents, Interdisciplinary Approach, Professional Education in Adolescent Health, School Health Programs, State Staff Development

Keith J. n.d.. Family-Focused Strategy for Reducing Premature and Unprotected Sexual Activity Among Minority Youth in School-Based Health Clinics [Final report]. Dallas, TX: Dallas County Hospital District, 26 pp.

Annotation: The purpose of this project was to develop and demonstrate effective intervention strategies for the 10–15 year age group that can be carried out within a school-based comprehensive health care system to reduce the occurrence of premature and unprotected sexual intercourse in adolescents. More than 300 10-year-old children and their parents enrolled to receive annual health maintenance evaluations and a series of activities to enhance parent-child communication, parental knowledge of adolescent social and sexual development, and problem-solving and decision-making skills. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Technical Information Service, U.S. Department of Commerce, 5301 Shawnee Road, Alexandria, VA 22312, Telephone: (703) 605-6050 Secondary Telephone: (888) 584-8332 E-mail: customerservice@ntis.gov Web Site: http://www.ntis.gov Document Number: NTIS PB99-133977.

Keywords: Adolescents, Blacks, Decision Making Skills, Healthy Tomorrows Partnership for Children, Hispanics, Minority Groups, Parent Child Interaction, Parent Child Relationship, Preventive Health Care Education, School Dropouts, School Health Programs, School Health Services, Sexual Activity, Sexually Transmitted Diseases

Children's Aid Society. n.d.. A history of innovation. New York, NY: Children's Aid Society, 1 v.

Annotation: This timeline tracks historic highlights from the Children's Aid Society's (CAS) founding in 1853, tracing changes in poverty in New York City along with the evolution of CAS programs and services. Topics include emigration programs such as the Orphan Train, foster care and adoption programs, lodging houses, industrial schools, convalescent homes, health centers, and farm schools.

Contact: Children's Aid Society, 105 East 22nd Street, New York, NY 10010, Telephone: (212) 949-4800 Secondary Telephone: (212) 949-4936 Fax: (212) 377-4705 Web Site: http://www.childrensaidsociety.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Children, Community programs, Comprehensive programs, History, Homeless persons, New York, Oral health, Poverty, Schools

Maryland Department of Health and Mental Hygiene, Office of Oral Health. n.d.. Environmental assessment guidelines. Baltimore, MD: Maryland Department of Health and Mental Hygiene, Office of Oral Health, 1 p.

Annotation: These guidelines provide information about an environmental assessment tool that school-based dental sealant programs or those wishing to launch a school-based dental sealant program can use to help determine whether the environment is conducive to operating such a program. The guidelines explain what the tool is, who it is for, how it can be used, why it should be used, and how often it should be used.

Contact: Maryland Department of Health and Mental Hygiene, Office of Oral Health, 201 West Preston Street, Third Floor, Baltimore, MD 21201, Telephone: (410) 767-5300 Secondary Telephone: (800) 735-2258 Fax: (410) 333-7392 E-mail: https://health.maryland.gov/Pages/contactus.aspx Web Site: http://phpa.dhmh.maryland.gov/oralhealth/Pages/home.aspx Available from the website.

Keywords: Dental care, Dental sealants, Guidelines, Oral health, Prevention, School age children, School health services, State programs, Tooth decay

The Children's Oral Health Institute. n.d.. Lessons in a lunch box: Healthy teeth essentials & facts about snackstm. Owings Mills, MD: The Children's Oral Health Institute,

Annotation: This lunch box provides parents with information about oral health and healthy eating choices and practices. The lunch box is illustrated with drawings that promote good oral health and good nutrition and contains a “Dental Care in a Carrot” case made to include a toothbrush, toothpaste, dental floss, and a rinse cup. Ordering information; downloadable files, including a description of the program, a 5-day lesson guide for teachers, and an outline of the lessons; a video about the program; and other supplemental materials are available on the website. The lunch box is also available in Braille.

Contact: Children's Oral Health Institute, 9199 Reisterstown Road, Suige 203A, Owings Mills, MD 21117, Telephone: (866) 508-7400 Fax: (410) 356-8574 E-mail: info@mycohi.org Web Site: http://www.mycohi.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Curricula, Educational materials, Health literacy, Oral health, Prevention, School health programs

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. n.d.. Oral health for children and adolescents: How can you help?. Atlanta, GA: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 2 pp. (Ideas for parents)

Annotation: This handout for parents explains why oral health is important and how to help prevent dental caries and other oral health problems. It presents a series of questions about school health services, including oral health services, that can help parents support their child’s school’s efforts to address oral health. Other questions presented cover oral health education, bullying prevention, how teachers reward students (i.e., with food or nonfood items), and whether students have access to free and clean drinking water. The handout explains how to find answers to the questions.

Contact: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 1600 Clifton Road, Atlanta, GA 30329-4027, Telephone: (800) 232-4636 Secondary Telephone: (888) 232-6348 E-mail: cdcinfo@cdc.gov Web Site: http://www.cdc.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Consumer education materials, Health education, Oral health, Prevention, School health programs

Healthiest State Initiative. 2020. 5 2 1 0 Healthy Choices Count: Action guide--Early care, education, after-school. Des Moines, IA: Healthiest State Initiative, 15 pp.

Annotation: This guide is part of the 5-2-1-0 Healthy Choices Count Program, an evidenced-based prevention framework to promote healthy habits. The guide discusses how early care and education sites can adopt a whole child approach to wellness and education by providing healthy foods in the classroom and cafeteria and creatively increasing physical activity throughout the day. The guide explains why the 5-2-1-0 method works and presents 10 strategies for success. It also discusses how to implement the program in an early care or education site in five steps: engage, register, implement, share, and check in.

Contact: Healthiest State Initiative, 301 Grand Avenue, Des Moines, IA 50309, Telephone: (515) 650-6854 Web Site: http://www.iowahealthieststate.com Available from the website.

Keywords: Nutrition, Physical activity, Preschool children, Prevention, School health programs, Young children

Healthiest State Initiative. 2020. 5 2 1 0 Healthy Choices Count: Action guide--Health care. Des Moines, IA: Healthiest State Initiative, 15 pp.

Annotation: This guide for health professionals is part of the 5-2-1-0 Healthy Choices Count Program, an evidence-based prevention framework to promote healthy habits. The guide discusses how health professionals can use the 5-2-1-0 method to help children stay healthy. It explains how health professionals can implement the program in five steps: engage, register, implement, share, and check in.

Contact: Healthiest State Initiative, 301 Grand Avenue, Des Moines, IA 50309, Telephone: (515) 650-6854 Web Site: http://www.iowahealthieststate.com Available from the website.

Keywords: Health programs, Nutrition, Physical activity, Prevention, School age children, Young children

Barzel R, Holt K, eds. 2019. Promoting oral health in schools: A resource guide (4th ed.). Washington, DC: National Maternal and Child Oral Health Resource Center, 35 pp.

Annotation: This guide provides resources to help health professionals, educators, parents, and others promote oral health and prevent oral disease in school-age children and adolescents. The guide is divided into two sections. The first section describes materials such as brochures, fact sheets, guidelines, curricula, and reports. The second section lists federal agencies and national organizations that may serve as resources. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Maternal and Child Oral Health Resource Center, Georgetown University, Box 571272, Washington, DC 20057-1272, Telephone: (202) 784-9771 E-mail: OHRCinfo@georgetown.edu Web Site: https://www.mchoralhealth.org Available from the website.

Keywords: , Disease prevention, Health promotion, Oral health, Resources for professionals, School age children, School health services, School linked programs, Young children

Fleming E. 2019. State dental screening laws for children: Examining the trend and impact—An update to the 2008 report. Washington, DC: Children's Dental Health Project, 17 pp.

Annotation: This report discusses whether state dental screening laws have expanded since the original report was published in 2008 and the degree to which these laws are advancing broader goals to improve access to oral health care and reduce oral disease. The report provides background information on how dental screening laws can serve as a policy approach to ensure that children are ready for school, reviews methods and results, and offers a discussion and recommendations.

Contact: Children's Dental Health Project, 1020 19th Street, N.W., Suite 400, Washington, DC 20036, Telephone: (202) 833-8288 Fax: (202) 331-1432 E-mail: info@cdhp.org Web Site: https://www.cdhp.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Dental caries, Health screening, Oral health, Public policy, School readiness, State legislation, State programs, Young children

Bauerly BC. 2019. Policy frameworks supporting school-based dental sealant programs and their application in Minnesota. St. Paul, MN: Network for Public Health Law, 13 pp. (Oral health issue brief)

Annotation: This brief identifies innovative laws and policies that could encourage consideration, adoption, and implementation of state-level school-based dental sealant programs. The brief examines the state of the law as it relates to such programs in Minnesota. Topics include considerations for forming partnerships between schools and oral health professionals, overcoming policy barriers, and statewide coordination.

Contact: Network for Public Health Law, 875 Summit Avenue, St. Paul, MN 55105, Telephone: (651) 695-7749 Fax: (651) 695-7749 Web Site: https://www.networkforphl.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Dental sealants, State programs, Legislation, Minnesota, , Oral health, Public policy, School health programs

Ohio Department of Health, Bureau of Maternal, Child, and Family Health. 2018. School-based dental sealant program manual. [Columbus, OH]: Ohio Department of Health, Bureau of Maternal, Child, and Family Health, 47 pp.

Annotation: This manual provides professional recommendations and states’ expectations for school-based dental sealant programs under the Ohio Department of Health (ODH). Contents include local program operations, regulatory compliance, compliance with ODH policies, sealant program eligibility, sample program forms, clinical materials and methods, retention checks, Medicaid billing and collection, reimbursement guidelines, health professional enrollment, filing claims, performance benchmarks and performance standards, reporting, ODH program reviews, and compliance with other ODH requirements. The appendices contain sample forms, records, letters, and other practice-related materials.

Contact: Ohio Department of Health, 246 North High Street, Columbus, OH 43215, Telephone: (614) 466-3543 Web Site: http://www.odh.ohio.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Children, Dental sealants, Forms, Guideline adherence, Manuals, Ohio, Oral health, Parents, Resources for professionals, School based clinics, State programs

Barzel R, Holt K, Kolo S, Siegal M, eds. 2018. School-based dental sealant programs (2nd. ed.). Washington, DC: National Maternal and Child Oral Health Resource Center, 1 v.

Annotation: This curriculum is designed to provide school- based dental sealant program (SBSP) staff with an understanding of the history, operations, and principles of SBSPs funded by the Ohio Department of Health (ODH). Contents include guide- lines for infection control and information about tooth selection and assessment for sealants; the sealant-application process; and SBSP operations, with an emphasis on requirements that apply to programs funded by ODH. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Maternal and Child Oral Health Resource Center, Georgetown University, Box 571272, Washington, DC 20057-1272, Telephone: (202) 784-9771 E-mail: OHRCinfo@georgetown.edu Web Site: https://www.mchoralhealth.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Children, Curricula, Dental sealants, Distance education, Ohio, Oral health, School based management, School health programs, School personnel

Children's Health Alliance of Wisconsin. 2018. Wisconsin Seal-A-Smile Administration Manual. Milwaukee, WI: Children's Health Alliance of Wisconsin, 35 pp.

Annotation: This manual provides policies and procedures for all Wisconsin Seal-A-Smile (SAS) grantees, with the goal of helping them administer programs and ensure consistency across programs. The purpose of SAS is to improve the oral health of Wisconsin children through school-based dental sealant programs. Topics include administrative and regulatory guidelines; program requirements; forms, reporting, and recording; and budget and funding information. Information about infection control and safe delivery of oral health care outside the dental office is included in appendices.

Contact: Children's Health Alliance of Wisconsin, 620 South 76th Street, Suite 120, Milwaukee, WI 53214, Telephone: (414) 292-4000 Secondary Telephone: (414) 337-4561 Fax: (414) 231-4972 Web Site: https://www.chawisconsin.org/ Available from the website.

Keywords: Administration, Data collection, Dental sealants, Disease prevention, Forms, Grants management, Oral health, Prevention programs, Reimbursement, School age children, School health programs, School health services, Screening, State programs, Wisconsin

Vidrine S, Hamrick A. 2018. School-based sealant programs: An innovative approach to improve children's oral health. Raleigh, NC: NC Child, 10 pp.

Annotation: This brief explores the impact of dental caries on children’s overall health and academic success and how North Carolina can take steps to improve children’s oral health through the use of school-based dental sealant programs (SBSPs). Topics include the impact of dental caries on children’s health and well-being, evidence-based solutions, SBSPs, the impact of SBSPs on children’s oral health outcomes, and North Carolina considerations. Recommendations for ways that North Carolina can improve children’s oral health and academic outcomes are included.

Contact: NC Child, 3101 Poplarwood Court, Suite 300, Raleigh, NC 27604, Telephone: (919) 834-6623 Web Site: http://www.ncchild.org/ Available from the website.

Keywords: Dental sealants, Disease prevention, North Carolina, Oral health, School age children, School health programs, State programs

Pew Charitable Trusts. 2018. When regulations block access to oral health care, children at risk suffer: The school dental sealant program dilemma. Philadelphia, PA: Pew Charitable Trusts, 12 (Issue brief)

Annotation: This brief describes state-based regulations or policies (e.g., related to dental practice acts, oral exams, employment requirements, procedures allowed under general supervision, Medicaid) that limit or prevent dental hygienists from applying dental sealants to children’s teeth at school or that create a financial burden for school-based dental sealant programs. The brief also discusses responses from a questionnaire for state dental directors.

Contact: Pew Charitable Trusts, One Commerce Square, 2005 Market Street, Suite 1700, Philadelphia, PA 19103-7077, Telephone: (215) 575-9050 Fax: (215) 575-4939 E-mail: info@pewtrusts.org Web Site: http://www.pewtrusts.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Barriers, Dental sealants, Oral health, Prevention programs, Public policy, School health services

Ohio Department of Health, Oral Health Program. 2018. Oral health screening survey of third grade schoolchildren in Ohio, 2017-18. Columbus, OH: Ohio Department of Health, Oral Health Program, 11 pp.

Annotation: This data brief reports results of an oral health screening survey of children in third grade conducted by the Ohio Department of Health during school year 2017–2018. The brief presents overall findings and discusses disparities in oral health; access to oral health care; impact on access to oral health care and insurance status on oral health status; percentage of children with a history of tooth decay, untreated tooth decay, and dental sealants in Ohio vs. in the nation as a whole; and survey results compared with Healthy People 2020 objectives. The significance of the findings is also discussed. Statistical data is provided, and a description of study methods is included.

Contact: Ohio Department of Health, Oral Health Program, 246 North High Street, Columbus, OH 43215, Telephone: (614) 466-4180 Fax: (614) 564-2421 E-mail: BCHS@odh.ohio.gov Web Site: https://odh.ohio.gov/wps/portal/gov/odh/know-our-programs/oral-health-program/welcome-to Available from the website.

Keywords: Access to health care, Dental caries, Dental sealants, Health insurance, Ohio, Oral health, School age children, State programs, Statistical data, Surveillance

Alliance for a Healthier Generation, Healthy Schools Campaign. [2017?]. Framework for action: Addressing nutrition and physical activity through ESSA implementation. Chicago, IL: Alliance for a Healthier Generation, Healthy Schools Campaign, 12 pp.

Annotation: This resource is a supplement to “State ESSA Plans to Support Student Health and Wellness: A Framework for Action.” This supplement provides more detailed recommendations for supporting nutrition and physical activity during the school day through the Every Student Succeeds Act implementation.

Contact: Healthy Schools Campaign, 175 N. Franklin, Suite 300, Chicago, IL 60606, Telephone: (312) 419-1810 Fax: (312) 419-1806 Web Site: http://www.healthyschoolscampaign.org

Keywords: Nutrition, Adolescent health, Child health, Physical activity, School age children, School health programs, Students

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This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number U02MC31613, MCH Advanced Education Policy, $3.5 M. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.