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Strengthening the evidence for maternal and child health programs

Search Results: MCHLine

Items in this list may be obtained from the sources cited. Contact information reflects the most current data about the source that has been provided to the MCH Digital Library.


Displaying records 1 through 20 (341 total).

Miller S. n.d.. New Horizons in School Health [Final report]. Baltimore, MD: University of Maryland at Baltimore, 35 pp.

Annotation: The project provided training experiences to enable health professionals in schools to work together and with school colleagues to provide developmentally appropriate, comprehensive health care. This enhanced the healthy development and academic success of school children. Additionally, the project providef training ot enable school health professionals to serve as effective preceptors for future student professionals. Twenty Maryland schools with school-based health programs established interdisciplinary teams consisting of health and education professionals. Each school-based team identified a health need in its school and designed, implemented, and evaluated a team project. Process evaluation was implemented following key activities. Outcome evaluation focused on outcomes related to specific project objectives. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Technical Information Service, U.S. Department of Commerce, 5301 Shawnee Road, Alexandria, VA 22312, Telephone: (703) 605-6050 Secondary Telephone: (888) 584-8332 E-mail: customerservice@ntis.gov Web Site: http://www.ntis.gov Document Number: NTIS PB97-121974.

Keywords: Adolescents, Interdisciplinary Approach, Professional Education in Adolescent Health, School Health Programs, State Staff Development

Keith J. n.d.. Family-Focused Strategy for Reducing Premature and Unprotected Sexual Activity Among Minority Youth in School-Based Health Clinics [Final report]. Dallas, TX: Dallas County Hospital District, 26 pp.

Annotation: The purpose of this project was to develop and demonstrate effective intervention strategies for the 10–15 year age group that can be carried out within a school-based comprehensive health care system to reduce the occurrence of premature and unprotected sexual intercourse in adolescents. More than 300 10-year-old children and their parents enrolled to receive annual health maintenance evaluations and a series of activities to enhance parent-child communication, parental knowledge of adolescent social and sexual development, and problem-solving and decision-making skills. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Technical Information Service, U.S. Department of Commerce, 5301 Shawnee Road, Alexandria, VA 22312, Telephone: (703) 605-6050 Secondary Telephone: (888) 584-8332 E-mail: customerservice@ntis.gov Web Site: http://www.ntis.gov Document Number: NTIS PB99-133977.

Keywords: Adolescents, Blacks, Decision Making Skills, Healthy Tomorrows Partnership for Children, Hispanics, Minority Groups, Parent Child Interaction, Parent Child Relationship, Preventive Health Care Education, School Dropouts, School Health Programs, School Health Services, Sexual Activity, Sexually Transmitted Diseases

Susin J, Kaplan L. n.d.. "Breaking the Silence" tool kit: A how-to guide to bring mental illness education to schools in your community—A school outreach project. (Rev. ed.). Lake Success, NY: National Alliance for the Mentally Ill Queens/Nassau, 46 pp.

Annotation: This tool kit, geared toward program facilitators and volunteer educators, provides methods for bringing the Breaking the Silence program to communities. The purpose of the program is to break the silence about mental illness in schools. The toolkit provides a background on Breaking the Silence, the rationale for mental illness education, information about how to organize and fund a local program, how to enlist and train volunteers, and materials documenting the success of Breaking the Silence. The program is intended for use in upper elementary, middle, and high school classrooms.

Contact: National Alliance for the Mentally Ill Queens/Nassau, 1981 Marcus Avenue, C-117, Lake Success, NY 11042, Telephone: (516) 326-0797 Secondary Telephone: (718) 347-7284 Fax: (516) 437-5785 E-mail: namiqn@aol.com Web Site: http://www.nami.org/MSTemplate.cfm?MicrositeID=241 Available from the website after registration.

Keywords: Adolescents, Children, Communities, Health education, Mental disorders, Mental health, Resource materials, Schools, Training

Missouri Department of Health and Senior Services, Oral Health Program. n.d.. K-12 oral health education curriculum (Powerpoint presentations). Jefferson City, MO: Missouri Department of Health and Senior Services, Oral Health Program, multiple items.

Annotation: These resources comprise oral health presentations for teachers, school nurses, and other health and education professionals to use in conjunction with Missouri's health-education curriculum. Contents include presentations (in English and Spanish) for use with students in kindergarten through 12th grade. A version targeted toward Native-American students is also available.

Contact: Missouri Department of Health and Senior Services, Oral Health Program, P.O. Box 570, Jefferson City, MO 65102-0570, Telephone: (573) 751-6400 Fax: (573) 751-6010 E-mail: info@health.mo.gov Web Site: http://health.mo.gov/living/families/oralhealth/index.php Available from the website.

Keywords: American Indians, Educational materials, Missouri, Oral health, School age children, School health education, Spanish language materials

The Children's Oral Health Institute. n.d.. Lessons in a lunch box: Healthy teeth essentials & facts about snackstm. Owings Mills, MD: The Children's Oral Health Institute,

Annotation: This lunch box provides families with information about oral health, healthy food choices, and other related topics. The lunch box is illustrated with drawings that promote good oral health and good nutrition and contains a “Dental Care in a Carrot” case made to include a toothbrush, toothpaste, dental floss, and a rinse cup. Ordering information; downloadable PDFs, including a description of the program, a 5-day lesson guide for teachers, and an outline of the lessons; a video about the program; and other supplemental materials are available on the website. The lunch box is also available in braille.

Contact: Children's Oral Health Institute, 9199 Reisterstown Road, Suige 203A, Owings Mills, MD 21117, Telephone: (866) 508-7400 Fax: (410) 356-8574 E-mail: info@mycohi.org Web Site: http://www.mycohi.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Curricula, Educational materials, Health literacy, Oral health, Prevention, School health programs

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. n.d.. Oral health for children and adolescents: How can you help?. Atlanta, GA: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 2 pp. (Ideas for parents)

Annotation: This handout for parents explains why oral health is important and how to help prevent dental caries and other oral health problems. It presents a series of questions about school health services, including oral health services, that can help parents support their child’s school’s efforts to address oral health. Other questions presented cover oral health education, bullying prevention, how teachers reward students (i.e., with food or nonfood items), and whether students have access to free and clean drinking water. The handout explains how to find answers to the questions.

Contact: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 1600 Clifton Road, Atlanta, GA 30329-4027, Telephone: (800) 232-4636 Secondary Telephone: (888) 232-6348 E-mail: cdcinfo@cdc.gov Web Site: http://www.cdc.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Consumer education materials, Health education, Oral health, Prevention, School health programs

Amah G, Jura M, Mertz E. 2019. Practice patterns of postgraduate dental residency completers from select long-term HRSA-funded primary dental care training programs. Rensselaer, NY: Oral Health Workforce Resource Center, 54 pp.

Annotation: This report describes a study conducted to examine practice patterns of graduates of primary care dental postgraduate training programs with a history of Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) funding. The study aims were to assess the impact of graduates’ training experience on current practice patterns and subsequent patient access to care and to measure the long-term impact of these programs on improving dentists' capacity to meet the needs of those who are underserved. The report provides background and discusses study methods, findings, and limitations. A discussion of the findings, including information about policy implications, is included.

Contact: Oral Health Workforce Research Center, New York Center for Health Workforce Studies, University of Albany, SUNY, School of Public Health, 1 University Place, Suite 220, Rensselaer, NY 12144-3445, Telephone: (518) 402-0250 Fax: (518) 402-0252 Web Site: http://www.oralhealthworkforce.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Access to health care, Dental schools, Dentists, Graduate education, Low income groups, Oral health, Public policy, Research

Barzel R, Holt K, Kolo S, Siegal M, eds. 2018. School-based dental sealant programs (2nd. ed.). Washington, DC: National Maternal and Child Oral Health Resource Center, 1 v.

Annotation: This curriculum is designed to provide school- based dental sealant program (SBSP) staff with an understanding of the history, operations, and principles of SBSPs funded by the Ohio Department of Health (ODH). Contents include guide- lines for infection control and information about tooth selection and assessment for sealants; the sealant-application process; and SBSP operations, with an emphasis on requirements that apply to programs funded by ODH. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Maternal and Child Oral Health Resource Center, Georgetown University, Box 571272, Washington, DC 20057-1272, Telephone: (202) 784-9771 E-mail: OHRCinfo@georgetown.edu Web Site: https://www.mchoralhealth.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Children, Curricula, Dental sealants, Distance education, Ohio, Oral health, School based management, School health programs, School personnel

School-Based Health Alliance and Oral Health 2020 Network. 2018. School oral health: An organizational framework to improve outcomes for children and adolescents. Washington DC: School-Based Health Alliance; Oral Health 2020 Network, 9 pp. (OH2020 white paper)

Annotation: This report presents Oral Health Progress and Equity Network (OPEN)—a network working toward framing oral health as health and focusing on oral health across the lifespan—2018 milestones set to serve as indicators of progress toward fulfillment of its 2020 targets. The report discusses the importance of each target to achieving oral health and overall health across the lifespan and describes progress toward each milestone. The report also includes an introduction to OPEN, discusses methodology, and presents findings of the 2018 milestone assessment in the following areas: children, schools, Medicare, Medicaid, measurement, person-centered care, and public perception.

Contact: School-Based Health Alliance, 1010 Vermont Avenue, N.W., Suite 600, Washington, DC 20005, Telephone: (202) 638-5872 Secondary Telephone: (888) 286-8727 Fax: (202) 638-5879 E-mail: info@nasbhc.org Web Site: http://www.sbh4all.org Available from the website.

Keywords: , Access to health care, Health education, Oral health, School health services, Prevention, Program coordination, Service coordination

School-Based Health Alliance and Oral Health 2020 Network. 2018. Confronting the consent conundrum: Lessons from a school oral health community. Washington DC: School-Based Health Alliance; Boston, MA: Oral Health 2020 Network, 6 pp. (OH2020 white paper)

Annotation: This document presents ideas that emerged from the School-Based Health Alliance initiative, Strengthening School Oral Health Services and Growing the School Oral Health Learning Community, and that resulted in an increase in the number of positive parental consents for school oral health services. The initiative encompassed the 10 largest U.S. school districts, which serve more than 4 million students, including a significant number of students with high needs. The document discusses school engagement, family engagement, community engagement, oral health education, and data collection and use.

Contact: School-Based Health Alliance, 1010 Vermont Avenue, N.W., Suite 600, Washington, DC 20005, Telephone: (202) 638-5872 Secondary Telephone: (888) 286-8727 Fax: (202) 638-5879 E-mail: info@nasbhc.org Web Site: http://www.sbh4all.org Available from the website.

Keywords: , Data collection, Health education, Informed consent, Initiatives, Low income groups, Oral health, School age children, School health services

Neufeld L, Gero A. [2017]. Adolescent oral health campaign final report: 2016-2017 school year. [Salt Lake City, UT: Utah Department of Health, Oral Health Program], 9 pp.

Annotation: This report provides information about activities of the Adolescent Oral Health Campaign during academic year 2016–2017. The purpose of the campaign was to educate students in middle school and high school in Utah, especially along the Wasatch Front, about oral health. The goal was to increase positive oral health behaviors and increase use of oral health services. The report describes the campaign’s goals, objectives, methods, and results.

Contact: Utah Department of Health, Oral Health Program, P.O. Box 142002, Salt Lake City, UT 84114-2002, Telephone: (801) 273-2995 Web Site: http://health.utah.gov/oralhealth Available from the website.

Keywords: , Adolescent health, Final reports, Health behaviors, Health education, High school students, Middle schools, Oral health, State surveys, Students, Utah

Connecticut State Dental Association. 2017. Connecticut cares about oral health: An oral health curriculum (rev. ed.). Southington, CT: Connecticut State Dental Association, multiple files.

Annotation: This packet is designed to help educators integrate oral health education into Connecticut's school health curricula. The packet comprises 6 lesson modules for educating students in pre-kindergarten through grade 12 about oral health and healthy behaviors. Each module lists objectives, questions, and related subject areas and can be used individually or in combination with recommended supportive activities and classroom materials. The revised online curriculum has modules for pre-kindergarten, kindergarten and grade 1, grades 2-3, grades 4-5, and grades 6-8.

Contact: Connecticut State Dental Association, 835 West Queen Street, Southington, CT 06489, Telephone: (860) 378-1800 Fax: (860) 378-1807 Web Site: http://www.csda.com Available from the website.

Keywords: Connecticut, Curricula, Oral health, Preschool education, School age children, School health education, State initiatives, Young children

Future Smiles. 2016–. Future Smiles: Program forms. Las Vegas, NV: Future Smiles, 3 items.

Annotation: These forms are intended for use in implementing a school-based oral hygiene program to provide preventive oral health services (screenings, cleanings, fluoride varnish applications, dental sealant application, and education) for children from families with low incomes in Nevada. Contents include referral and consent forms and a privacy notice in English and Spanish.

Contact: Future Smiles, 3074 Arville Street, Las Vegas, NV 89102, Telephone: (702) 889-3763 E-mail: info@futuresmiles.net Web Site: http://futuresmilies.net Available from the website.

Keywords: Access to health care, Adolescents, Children, Consumer education materials, Dental sealants, Disease prevention, Fluorides, Forms, Infants, Low income groups, Nevada, Oral health, Oral hygiene, Preventive health services, Referrals, Schools, Spanish language materials

Future Smiles. 2016–. Future Smiles: Student survey. Las Vegas, NV: Future Smiles, 1 item.

Annotation: These satisfaction surveys are intended for use in implementing a school-based oral hygiene pro- gram that provides preventive oral health services (screenings, dental cleanings, fluoride varnish applications, dental sealant application, and oral health education) for children from families with low incomes in Nevada. Contents include surveys for students, parents, and teachers in English and Spanish.

Contact: Future Smiles, 3074 Arville Street, Las Vegas, NV 89102, Telephone: (702) 889-3763 E-mail: info@futuresmiles.net Web Site: http://futuresmilies.net Available from the website.

Keywords: Access to health care, Adolescents, Children, Consumer satisfaction, Dental sealants, Disease prevention, Fluorides, Health education, Infants, Low income groups, Nevada, Oral health, Oral hygiene, Preventive health services, Referrals, Schools, Screening, Spanish language materials, Surveys

Commission on Dental Education. 2016. Accreditation standards for dental education programs [rev.]. Chicago, IL: American Dental Association, 38 pp.

Annotation: This document delineates the standards that dental education programs leading to the D.D.S. or D.M.D. degree must meet to achieve and maintain accreditation. Contents include minimum acceptable requirements for programs and guidance on alternative and preferred methods of meeting standards. The document also provides program-development guidance for institutions that wish to establish new programs or improve existing ones.

Contact: American Dental Association, 211 East Chicago Avenue, Chicago, IL 60611-2678, Telephone: (312) 440-2500 Fax: (312) 440-7494 E-mail: info@ada.org Web Site: http://www.ada.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Accreditation, Dental education, Dental schools, Dentists, Oral health, Program development, Standards

Community Preventive Services Task Force. 2016. Promoting health equity. Atlanta, GA: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, multiple items.

Annotation: These resources provide evidence-based recommendations and findings about what works to promote health equity in the community. Topics include education programs and policies, culturally competent health care, and housing programs and policies. Presentation and promotional materials are included.

Contact: Community Preventive Services Task Force, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Community Guide Branch, 1600 Clifton Road, N.E., MSE69, Atlanta, GA 30329, Telephone: (404) 498-6595 E-mail: communityguide@cdc.gov Web Site: https://www.thecommunityguide.org/task-force/community-preventive-services-task-force-members Available from the website.

Keywords: Cultural competence, Early childhood education, Low income groups, After school programs, Child development centers, Community based programs, Community development, Community health centers, Consumer education materials, Culturally competent services, Education, Educational attainment, Equal opportunities, Financial support, Health care delivery, Health education, Health promotion, Housing, Kindergarten, Patient education materials, Public policy, Recruitment, Research, Retention, School based clinics, Training, Translation, Work force

Love HL, Soleimanpour S, Schelar E, Even M, Carrozza M, Grandmont J. 2016. Children's health and education mapping tool. Washington, DC: School-Based Health Alliance, 1 v.

Annotation: This tool contains county-level information on child health, education, and socioeconomic status that can be searched, mapped, downloaded, and compared to national averages. Users can also map, filter, and display key characteristics of public school and school-based health center locations. A user manual and video tutorials are provided.

Contact: School-Based Health Alliance, 1010 Vermont Avenue, N.W., Suite 600, Washington, DC 20005, Telephone: (202) 638-5872 Secondary Telephone: (888) 286-8727 Fax: (202) 638-5879 E-mail: info@nasbhc.org Web Site: http://www.sbh4all.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Child health, Data, Education, Information systems, Integrated information systems, Maps, School based clinics, Schools, Socioeconomic status

U.S. Department of Education. 2016. Healthy students, promising futures: State and local action steps and practices to improve school-based health. Washington, DC: U.S. Department of Education, 16 pp.

Annotation: This toolkit contains information that details five high impact opportunities for states and local school districts to support communities through collaboration between the education and health sectors, highlighting best practices and key research in both areas. Contents include resources, programs, and services offered by non-governmental organizations.

Contact: U.S. Department of Education, 400 Maryland Avenue, S.W., Washington, DC 20202, Telephone: (800) 872-5327 Secondary Telephone: (800) 437-0833 Web Site: http://www.ed.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Case management, Collaboration, Communities, Community action, Educational reform, Eligibility, Health care reform, Health education, Health insurance, Health services delivery, Hospitals, Medicaid managed care, Needs assessment, Nutrition, Physical activity, Public private partnerships, Reimbursement, Role, School districts, State government, Students

Institute of Medicine, Committee on Educating Health Professionals to Address the Social Determinants of Health. 2016. Framework for educating health professionals to address the social determinants of health. Washington, DC: National Academies Press, 170 pp.

Annotation: This report presents a framework for educating health professionals to address the conditions in which people are born, grow, work, live, and age, as well as the wider set of forces and systems shaping the conditions of daily life including economic policies, development agendas, cultural and social norms, social policies, and political systems. Contents include theoretical constructs and examples of programs and frameworks addressing elements of the social determinants of health. The framework aligns education, health, and other sectors to meet local needs in partnership with communities.

Contact: National Academies Press, 500 Fifth Street, N.W., Keck 360, Washington, DC 20001, Telephone: (202) 334-3313 Secondary Telephone: (888) 624-8373 Fax: (202) 334-2451 E-mail: customer_service@nap.edu Web Site: http://www.nap.edu Available from the website.

Keywords: Collaboration, Continuing education, Cultural diversity, Evaluation, Evidence based medicine, Health occupations, Inclusive schools, Mentors, Model programs, Models, Professional education, Public health education, Sociocultural factors, Socioeconomic factors, Training, Work force

National Coordinating Committee on School Health and Safety. 2016. NCCSHS 19th annual meeting: The Every Student Succeeds Act–What does it mean for student achievement, health and safety? [participant folder]. [no place]: National Coordinating Committee on School Health and Safety, 1 v.

Annotation: This binder contains materials from a meeting of federal agency and national nongovernmental organization staff held on May 20, 2015, in Rockville, Maryland, to discuss the Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA) and what it means for student achievement, health, and safety. Contents include the agenda, speaker biographies, a list of meeting participants, and a list of organizations participating in National Coordinating Committee on School Health and Safety (NCCSHS); handouts; small group discussion materials; and background materials. Topics include ESSA provisions intended to support safe and healthy students and how other federal agency program align with those provisions, the ESSA appropriations process including the development of regulations and provision of technical assistance to states for implementing the regulations, and high impact opportunities for connecting health and education. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: Maternal and Child Health Library at Georgetown University, Box 571272, Washington, DC 20057-1272, Telephone: (202) 784-9770 E-mail: mchgroup@georgetown.edu Web Site: https://www.mchlibrary.org Single photocopies available at no charge.

Keywords: Academic achievement, Collaboration, Community participation, Federal initiatives, Health promotion, Meetings, Nutrition, Physical education, Program coordination, Public policy, Public private partnerships, Relationships, School age children, School health education, School health programs, School health services, School safety

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This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number U02MC31613, MCH Advanced Education Policy, $3.5 M. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.