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Strengthening the evidence for maternal and child health programs

Search Results: MCHLine

Items in this list may be obtained from the sources cited. Contact information reflects the most current data about the source that has been provided to the MCH Digital Library.


Displaying records 1 through 20 (34 total).

Piekarz E, Schermbeck R, Young SK, Leider J, Ziemann M, Chriqui JF. 2016. School district wellness policies: Evaluating progress and potential for improving children's health eight years after the federal mandate–Volume 4. Chicago, IL: University of Illinois at Chicago, Institute for Health Research and Policy, 184 pp.

Annotation: This monograph reports key findings from a comprehensive, ongoing, nationwide evaluation of written school district wellness policies. Contents include data from school years 2006–2007 through 2013–2014, the first eight years following the required implementation data for wellness policies. Topics include background on the federal requirement for school district wellness policies, methodology for assessing policy strength and district characteristics, comprehensiveness and strength of wellness policies, key findings of wellness policy provisions, and future research needs.

Contact: University of Illinois at Chicago, Institute for Health Research and Policy, 1747 West Roosevelt Road, 5th Floor, Chicago, IL 60608-1264, Telephone: (312) 996-7222 Secondary Telephone: (866) 757-4507 Fax: (312) 996-2703 E-mail: IHRPinfo@uic.edu Web Site: http://www.ihrp.uic.edu Available from the website.

Keywords: Federal legislation, Health policy, Nutrition education, Physical activity, Physical education, Policy development, Regulations, Research, School districts, School food services, Trends

Fobbs E, Grady K, Chiang RJ, Zavacky F. 2015. State school health policy matrix 2.0. [Atlanta, GA]: National Association of Chronic Disease Directors; [Washington, DC]: National Association of State Boards of Education; [Reston, VA]: Society of Health and Physical Educators, 31 pp.

Annotation: This guide outlines state-level school health policies related to competitive foods and beverages, physical education and physical activity, and administration of medication in the school environment. Contents include a direct link to the policy and information about which political entity or agency adopted the policy or issued guidance.

Contact: National Association of Chronic Disease Directors, 2200 Century Parkway, Suite 250, Atlanta, GA 30345, Telephone: (770) 458-7400 Web Site: https://chronicdisease.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Drugs, Health policy, Physical activity, Physical education, Policy development, School food services, Schools, Service delivery systems

National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion. 2015. Comprehensive framework for addressing the school nutrition environment and services. Atlanta, GA: National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, 8 pp.

Annotation: This document describes components of the school nutrition environment and resources to support a healthy school nutrition environment. Topics include school meals, smart snacks in school; in-school fundraisers; classroom celebrations, events, and nonfood rewards; access to drinking water; staff role modeling; food and beverage marketing; and healthy eating learning opportunities.

Contact: National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 1600 Clifton Road, Atlanta, GA 30329-4027, Telephone: (800) 232-4636 Secondary Telephone: (888) 232-6348 E-mail: cdcinfo@cdc.gov Web Site: http://www.cdc.gov/nccdphp Available from the website.

Keywords: Fluid intake, Food consumption, Health policy, Health promotion, Learning, Marketing, Models, Nutrition, Policy development, Role models, School health services, Schools, Snacks, Water

Connell C. 2014. Procuring local foods for child nutrition programs. Alexandria, VA: U.S. Food and Nutrition Service, 116 pp.

Kids' Safe and Healthful Foods Project. 2013. Serving healthy school meals: Despite challenges, schools meet USDA meal requirements. Philadelphia, PA: Pew Charitable Trusts; Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, 58 pp.

Annotation: This report presents findings about the challenges school districts face in implementing updated federal meal standards set by the US Department of Agriculture, when they expect to be able to meet the standards, and how they are finding solutions to challenges in meeting the standards.

Contact: Pew Charitable Trusts, One Commerce Square, 2005 Market Street, Suite 1700, Philadelphia, PA 19103-7077, Telephone: (215) 575-9050 Fax: (215) 575-4939 E-mail: info@pewtrusts.org Web Site: http://www.pewtrusts.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Child nutrition, Federal programs, School food services, School lunch programs

National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Division of Population Health. 2013. Voluntary guidelines for managing food allergies in schools and early care and education programs. Atlanta, GA: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 103 pp.

Annotation: These guidelines provide practical information and planning steps for parents, district administrators, school administrators and staff, and early childhood education (ECE) program administrators and staff to develop or strengthen plans for food allergy management and prevention. It includes recommendations for each of the five priority areas that should be addressed in each school’s or ECE program’s Food Allergy Management Prevention Plan: (1) ensure the daily management of food allergies in individual children, (2) prepare for food allergy emergencies, (3) provide professional development on food allergies for staff members, (4) educate children and family members about food allergies, and (5) create and maintain a healthy and safe educational environment.

Contact: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 1600 Clifton Road, Atlanta, GA 30329-4027, Telephone: (800) 232-4636 Secondary Telephone: (888) 232-6348 E-mail: cdcinfo@cdc.gov Web Site: http://www.cdc.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Emergencies, Food allergies, Planning, Prevention services, School age children, School food services, Young children

Wiecha JL, Gannett E, Roth B. [2012]. Healthy eating in out-of-school time: The promise and the challenge. (Wellesley, MA): National Institute for Out-of-School TIme at Wellesley Centers for Women, 7 pp.

Annotation: This report explores healthy eating concepts among out-of-school time (OST) program administrators and examines their perception of the importance of the childhood obesity epidemic. It also explores the perceived barriers to serving healthful foods in OST programs and examines the potential utility of guidelines and other managerial supports in helping such programs adopt healthy eating practices.

Contact: Wellesley Centers for Women, Wellesley College, 106 Central Street, Wellesley, MA 02481, Telephone: (781) 283-2500 Fax: (781) 283-2504 E-mail: wcw@wellesley.edu Web Site: http://www.wcwonline.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Child care services, Child nutrition, Food consumption, Guidelines, Health promotion, School age children

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. 2011. Under pressure: Sodium reduction in the school environment. Atlanta, GA: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 7 pp.

Annotation: This guide offers strategies to help those who are working to improve the school food environment through sodium reduction. It describes how high sodium intake can contribute to poor health outcomes and how exposure to sodium within the school environment can alter students' food preferences. Strategy topics include incorporating nutrition education into health education for children; implementing nutrient standards; modifying the school environment so that healthy foods are more prominently displayed; and reaching out to community partners such as youth organizations and local health associations. The guide is part of a series offering strategies for sodium reduction in various settings and is an outcome of the Centers for Disease Control and Health Prevention's (CDC’s) 2010 Public Health Law Summit on Sodium Reduction.

Contact: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 1600 Clifton Road, Atlanta, GA 30329-4027, Telephone: (800) 232-4636 Secondary Telephone: (888) 232-6348 E-mail: cdcinfo@cdc.gov Web Site: http://www.cdc.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Child nutrition, Nutrients, Prevention, Program improvement, School food services, Sodium

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. 2011. School health guidelines to promote healthy eating and physical activity. MMWR Recommendations and Reports 60(5):1-76,

Annotation: This report synthesizes the scientific evidence and best practices on healthy eating and physical activity into one set of guidelines for schools serving students in kindergarten through 12th grade. Topics include coordination of school policies and practices; supportive environments; school nutrition services; physical education and physical activity programs; health education; health, mental health, and social services; family and community involvement; school employee wellness; and professional development for school staff members. Each of nine guidelines is accompanied training are also available from the website.

Contact: Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 1600 Clifton Road, Atlanta, GA 30329-4027, Telephone: (800) 232-4636 Secondary Telephone: (888) 232-6348 E-mail: cdcinfo@cdc.gov Web Site: http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr Available from the website.

Keywords: Food consumption, Guidelines, Health policy, Health promotion, Physical activity, Physical education, School health education, School health services, School personnel, Schools

Stapley D. 2011. Role of nutrition in learning and behavior: A resource list for professionals. Beltsville, MD: Food and Nutrition Information Center, 30 pp.

Annotation: This document lists journal articles, websites, and other resources on the role of nutrition in learning and behavior in children. Topics include the role of nutrient status and school meal programs in learning and behavior and the relationship between school-based physical activity and academic performance in the United States and in non-U.S. countries.

Contact: U.S. Food and Nutrition Information Center, National Agricultural Library, 10301 Baltimore Avenue, Room 105, Beltsville, MD 20705-2351, Telephone: (301) 504-5719 Secondary Telephone: (301) 504-5248 Fax: (301) 504-6409 E-mail: fnic@nal.usda.gov Web Site: http://fnic.nal.usda.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Academic achievement, Behavior problems, Bibliographies, Children, International health, Learning, Nutrients, Nutrition, Physical activity, Research, Resources for professionals, School food services

Stallings VA, Suitor CW, Taylor CL, eds.; Institute of Medicine, Committee on Nutrition Standards for National School Lunch and Breakfast Programs. 2010. School meals: Building blocks for healthy children. Washington, DC: National Academies Press, 380 pp.

Annotation: This report provides recommendations for the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) on revising its standards and requirements so that school meals are more healthful. The recommendations are based on a review and assessment of Dietary Reference Intakes (a system of nutrition recommendations from the Institute of Medicine) and the 2005 Dietary Guidelines for Americans (jointly prepared by the USDA and the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services). The eight recommendations in the report update the National School Lunch Program (NSLP) and School Breakfast Program (SBP) nutrition standards and meal requirements approved in 1995; shift the focus toward meeting recommendations in the 2005 Dietary Guidelines; emphasize the need for effective implementation; and identify key research topics. The recommendations encompass standards for menu planning and standards for meals as selected by the student (in contrast to those that are simply offered to students). Seventeen appendixes include sample menus, data tales, definitions, and comparisons between the existing guidelines and proposed revisions for school meal preparation.

Contact: National Academies Press, 500 Fifth Street, N.W., Keck 360, Washington, DC 20001, Telephone: (202) 334-3313 Secondary Telephone: (888) 624-8373 Fax: (202) 334-2451 E-mail: customer_service@nap.edu Web Site: http://www.nap.edu Available from the website.

Keywords: Child health promotion, Data, Dietary guidelines, Federal programs, Nutrition assessment, Nutrition monitoring, Nutrition programs, Program evaluation, School age children, School breakfast programs, School food services, School lunch programs

Turner L, Chriqui J, Sandoval A. 2010. School policies and practices to improve health and prevent obesity: National Elementary School Survey results—Executive summary. Chicago, IL: Bridging the Gap, 15 pp.

Annotation: This report examines the ways in which elementary school practices are not aligned with national recommendations concerning diet and physical activity. The findings are based on data obtained from administrators at nationally representative samples of public and private elementary schools that reflect policies and practices in schools during the 2006–07 and 2007–08 school years. Included are survey results related to the nutritional content of meals served through the National School Lunch Program; the availability of "competitive" foods — i.e., food or beverages sold through school stores, vending machines, and a la carte cafeteria lines — and to what extent public school students were offered daily and weekly physical education as recommended by the National Association of Sport and Physical Education.

Contact: Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, 50 College Road East, Princeton, NJ 08540-6614, Telephone: (877) 843-7953 Fax: Web Site: http://www.rwjf.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Dietary Guidelines, Evaluation, Guidelines, Physical activity, School age children, School food services, School lunch programs, School surveys

Robert Wood Johnson Foundation. 2009. Improving child nutrition policy: Insights from National USDA Study of School Food Environments. Princeton, NJ: Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, 4 pp.

Annotation: This policy brief offers information about the third School Nutrition Dietary Assessment Study, which provides the most comprehensive and up-to-date information on the overall food environment in public elementary, middle, and high schools. The brief presents key findings of the survey in three categories: competitive foods, school meals, and policy recommendations.

Contact: Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, 50 College Road East, Princeton, NJ 08540-6614, Telephone: (877) 843-7953 Fax: Web Site: http://www.rwjf.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent nutrition, Child nutrition, Elementary schools, High schools, Middle schools, Public policy, School food services

Wandner D, Hair E. 2009. Research-based recommendations to improve child nutrition in schools and out-of-school time programs. Washington, DC: Child Trends, 6 pp.

Annotation: This paper discusses aspects of healthy diets for children in elementary and middle school. It summarizes the current federal guidelines and recommendations for child nutrition and provides information for schools and out-of-school time programs about how to measure child nutrition.

Contact: Child Trends, 7315 Wisconsin Avenue, Suite 1200 W, Bethesda, MD 20814, Telephone: (240) 223-9200 E-mail: Web Site: http://www.childtrends.org Available from the website.

Keywords: After school programs, Child nutrition, Guidelines, Nutrition education, Nutrition programs, School age children, School food services

Ralston K, Newman C, Clauson A, Guthrie J, Buzby J. 2008. The National School Lunch Program: Background, trends, and issues. Washington, DC: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Economic Research Service, 48 pp. (Economic research report number 61)

Annotation: This report provides background information on the National School Lunch Program, including historical trends and participant characteristics. It also addresses steps being taken to meet challenges facing administrators of the program, including trade-offs between nutritional quality of the foods served, costs, and participation, as well as between program access and program integrity.

Contact: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Economic Research Service, 1800 M Street, N.W., Washington, DC 20036-5831, Telephone: (202) 694-5050 E-mail: infocenterers.usda.gov Web Site: http://www.ers.usda.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Child nutrition, Costs, Federal programs, Participation, School food services, School lunch programs, Trends

Committee on Nutrition Standards for Foods in Schools, Stallings VA, Yaktine AL, eds. 2007. Nutrition standards for foods in schools: Leading the way toward healthier youth. Washington, DC: National Academies Press, 282 pp.

Annotation: This book offers reviews and recommendations about appropriate nutrition standards and guidance for the sale, content, and consumption of foods and beverages at school, with attention given to foods and beverages offered in competition with federally reimbursable meals and snacks. Topics include nutrition-related health concerns, dietary intakes, eating behaviors in children and adolescents, the school environment, and food and beverages sold outside the school meal program. Additional topics include federal, state, local, and industry initiatives; recommended standards and actions for competitive foods in schools and next steps. References are provided as well as appendices including acronyms and a glossary; energy requirements; nutrition standards for competitive foods sold in elementary, middle, or high school set by states; additional guidelines, open sessions at a workshop on nutrition standards for schools, and biographical sketches of members of the authoring committee. An index concludes the book.

Contact: National Academies Press, 500 Fifth Street, N.W., Keck 360, Washington, DC 20001, Telephone: (202) 334-3313 Secondary Telephone: (888) 624-8373 Fax: (202) 334-2451 E-mail: customer_service@nap.edu Web Site: http://www.nap.edu Available from the website. Document Number: ISBN 978-0-309-10383-1.

Keywords: Adolescent behavior, Child behavior, Elementary schools, High schools, Junior high schools, Nutrition assessment, School food services, School lunch programs, Standards

National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Division of Adolescent and School Health. 2006, 2000, 1994. School health policies and programs study: Questionnaires. Atlanta, GA: National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Division of Adolescent and School Health,

Annotation: These questionnaires are designed to assess school health policies and programs at the state, district, school, and classroom levels. Components include health education, physical education and activity, health services, mental health and social services, nutrition services and foods and beverages available at school, healthy and safe school environment, physical school environments, faculty and staff health promotion, and family and community involvement in schools.

Contact: National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 1600 Clifton Road, Atlanta, GA 30329-4027, Telephone: (800) 232-4636 Secondary Telephone: (888) 232-6348 E-mail: cdcinfo@cdc.gov Web Site: http://www.cdc.gov/nccdphp Available from the website.

Keywords: Food service, Health education, Health policy, Health services, Local government, Physical education, Policies, Programs, Questionnaires, Schools, State government, Survey tools, Teachers

Cama S, Parker L, Levin M, FitzSimmons C. 2006. School wellness policy and practice: Meeting the needs of low-income students. Washington, DC: Food Research and Action Center, 68 pp.

Annotation: This guide is designed to help stakeholders in schools that serve large numbers of low-income students become active participants in the process of developing a school wellness policy. The guide begins by giving suggestions on how to engage different members of the school community in the wellness policy process and then moves on to address some of the required components of the policy and possible challenges along the way, such as increasing access to nutritious food for all students, changing the nutrition environment of the school, addressing financial concerns, and developing goals for nutrition education and physical activity. Other topics covered include establishing nutritional guidelines for all foods available at school, incorporating nutrition education into the school day, increasing physical activity at school, and after-school and summer programs. The guide includes two appendices: (1) Federal wellness policy legislation -- Section 204 of Public Law 108-265 and (2) a copy of the U.S. Department of Agriculture's Healthier US Schools Challenge Criteria for Elementary Schools. The guide also includes an executive summary.

Contact: Food Research and Action Center, 1875 Connecticut Avenue, N.W., Suite 540, Washington, DC 20009, Telephone: (202) 986-2200 Fax: (202) 986-2525 Web Site: http://www.frac.org/ Available from the website.

Keywords: After school programs, Child health, Financing, Low income groups, Nutrition, Physical activity, School age children, School food services, School health, School health programs

Wootan M, Johanson J, Powell J. 2006. School foods report card: A state-by-state evaluation of policies for foods and beverages sold through vending machines, school stores, a la carte, and other venues outside of school meals. Washington, DC: Center for Science in the Public Interest, 47 pp.

Annotation: This report provides a state-by-state evaluation of policies for foods and beverages sold through vending machines, school stores, a la carte, and other venues outside school meals.The report is based on nutrition polices of all 50 states and the District of Columbia. The report grades each state policy on five key considerations: (1) beverage nutrition standards, (2) food nutrition standards, (3) grade level(s) to which policies apply, (4) time during the school day to which policies apply, and (5) location(s) on campus to which these policies apply. The report also provides a discussion of state policies and their implications, as well as recommendations. The report includes three appendices: (1) model school nutrition standards for foods and beverages sold outside meals, (2) state school foods report card, and (3) summary of state policies for foods and beverages sold out of vending machines, school stores, and other venues outside school meals. References are included.

Contact: Center for Science in the Public Interest, 1220 L Street, N.W., Suite 300, Washington, DC 20005, Telephone: (202) 332-9110 Fax: (202) 265-4954 E-mail: cspi@cspinet.org Web Site: http://www.cspinet.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Child health, Evaluation, Food, Health policy, Nutrition, Public policy, School age children, School food services

U.S. Food and Nutrition Service, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, and U.S. Department of Education. 2005. Making it happen!: School nutrition success stories. Alexandria, VA: U.S. Food and Nutrition Service, 354 pp.

Annotation: This report tells the stories of schools and school districts that have implemented innovative strategies to improve the nutritional quality of foods and beverages sold outside of Federal meal programs. Topics include the importance of healthy eating for children and adolescents, how schools can support good nutrition, and the process of change and school nutrition policies. Stories are divided into six chapters based on the primary approach used to promote healthy eating. A variety of support materials are also included. Stories are also accessible via an online interface that may be searched by category, location, grade, and keyword.

Contact: U.S. Food and Nutrition Service, 3101 Park Center Drive, Alexandria, VA 22302, Web Site: http://www.fns.usda.gov/fns Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent nutrition, Child nutrition, School food services, School lunch programs, Schools

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This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number U02MC31613, MCH Advanced Education Policy, $3.5 M. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.