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Strengthening the evidence for maternal and child health programs

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Items in this list may be obtained from the sources cited. Contact information reflects the most current data about the source that has been provided to the MCH Digital Library.


Displaying records 1 through 20 (53 total).

American Lung Association. n.d.. Model policy for school districts: Stock bronchodilators. Washington, DC: American Lung Association, 5 pp.

Annotation: This document is designed to help school districts improve the health and academic outcomes of students with asthma. The document provides a framework for developing policies allowing use of stock bronchodilators in schools. Contents include information about implementing a model policy and creating a protocols and procedures document. A model policy template with definitions and conditions for administering, administering and storing, and obtaining stock bronchodilators is also included.

Contact: American Lung Association, 1300 Pennsylvania Ave., N.W., Suite 800, Washington, DC 20004, Telephone: (202) 785-3355 Secondary Telephone: (800) 548-8252 Fax: (202) 452-1805 E-mail: info@lungusa.org Web Site: http://www.lungusa.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Academic achievement, Asthma, Child health, Chronic illnesses and disabilities, Disease management, Models, Policy development, School age children, School districts, School nurses, Schools, Self care

Pudelski S. 2017. Cutting Medicaid: A prescription to hurt the neediest kids. Alexandria, VA: AASA, The School Superintendents' Association, 11 pp.

Annotation: This report presents findings from a survey of school leaders about how service delivery and student health would be impacted by a decline in Medicaid reimbursement. The report outlines the survey questions and findings, highlights how students with disabilities and students with low incomes will be impacted by a per-capita cap or Medicaid block grant, describes how communities will be economically affected by a per-capita cap or Medicaid block grant for school districts, details the potential of districts to lose critical mental health supports for students that are reimbursable by Medicaid, and notes how district efforts to expand Medicaid coverage to students and their families will be undermined by a block grant or per-capita cap.

Contact: AASA, The School Superintendents' Association, 1615 Duke Street, Alexandria, VA 22314, Telephone: (703) 578-0700 Fax: (703)-841-1543 E-mail: info@aasa.org Web Site: http://www.aasa.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent health, Adolescents, Block grants, Child health, Children, Financing, Low income groups, Medicaid, National surveys, Policy development, Reimbursement, School age children, School districts, Service delivery, Special health care needs, State programs, Students

Hall E. 2017. Identifying a school quality/student success indicator for ESSA: Requirements and considerations. Washington, DC: Council of Chief State School Officers, 12 pp.

Annotation: This brief describes the Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA) requirements for the inclusion of a school quality or student success indicator (referred to as the "5th indicator), including requirements to ensure that the indicator contributes to a state's system of school and district accountability. Highlights include key factors to consider when identifying, evaluating, and implementing a school quality or student success indicator for inclusion in a state's accountability system. Examples of school quality and student success indicators and research supporting those indicators are included.

Contact: Council of Chief State School Officers, One Massachusetts Avenue, N.W., Suite 700, Washington, DC 20001-1431, Telephone: (202) 336-7000 Fax: (202) 408-8072 E-mail: info@ccsso.org Web Site: http://www.ccsso.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Accountability, Evaluation, Limited English speakers, Measures, Program improvement, Quality assurance, Regulations, School districts, Schools, Students, Systems development

Roche MK, Blank M, Jacobson R. 2017. Community schools: A whole-child framework for school improvement. Washington, DC: Institute for Educational Leadership, Coalition for Community Schools, 26 pp.

Annotation: This paper proposes community schools as a strategy for school improvement. Topics include what a community school looks like at the school level, how community schools support provisions in the Every Student Succeeds Act, and how states can support community schools. Information about community school and initiative exemplars, resources, and partners are included.

Contact: Institute for Educational Leadership, Coalition for Community Schools, 4301 Connecticut Avenue, N.W., Suite 100, Washington, DC 20008-2304, Telephone: (202) 822-8405 X111 Fax: (202) 872-4050 E-mail: ccs@iel.org Web Site: http://www.communityschools.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescents, Children, Coalitions, Collaboration, Community coordination, Community participation, Equal opportunities, Families, Learning, Models, Organizational change, Program improvement, Public private partnerships, Relationships, School districts, Schools, Service integration, Social support, Systems development

U.S. Department of Education. 2016. Healthy students, promising futures: State and local action steps and practices to improve school-based health. Washington, DC: U.S. Department of Education, 16 pp.

Annotation: This toolkit contains information that details five high impact opportunities for states and local school districts to support communities through collaboration between the education and health sectors, highlighting best practices and key research in both areas. Contents include resources, programs, and services offered by non-governmental organizations.

Contact: U.S. Department of Education, 400 Maryland Avenue, S.W., Washington, DC 20202, Telephone: (800) 872-5327 Secondary Telephone: (800) 437-0833 Web Site: http://www.ed.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Case management, Collaboration, Communities, Community action, Educational reform, Eligibility, Health care reform, Health education, Health insurance, Health services delivery, Hospitals, Medicaid managed care, Needs assessment, Nutrition, Physical activity, Public private partnerships, Reimbursement, Role, School districts, State government, Students

Somers S. 2016. Medicaid's Early and Periodic, Screening, Diagnosis and Treatment in schools and the Free Care Rule. Health Advocate 46:1–3,

Annotation: This newsletter describes the Early and Periodic Screening, Diagnostic, and Treatment (EPSDT) program and opportunities for school districts to significantly expand the range of health care services, including oral health services, available to students from families with low incomes. Topics include the importance of having sufficient numbers and types of health professionals participating in Medicaid programs in their area, how providing Medicaid services in schools can help to address children's and adolescents' unmet health care needs, and federal guidance on Medicaid reimbursement for services that are provided at no charge (previously known as the Free Care Rule).

Contact: National Health Law Program, 1441 I Street, N.W., Suite 1105, Washington, DC 20005, Telephone: (202) 289-7724 E-mail: nhelp@healthlaw.org Web Site: http://www.healthlaw.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Dental care, EPSDT, Health care financing, Health care reform, Health services delivery, Low income groups, Medicaid, Oral health, Reimbursement, School age children, School districts, Work force

National Center for HIV/AIDS, Viral Hepatits, STD, and TB Prevention, Division of Adolescent and School Health. 2016. Anti-bullying policies and enumeration: An infobrief for local education agencies. Atlanta, GA: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 4 pp.

Annotation: This brief for local education agency staff describes enumeration in the context of anti-bullying policies, referring to any specific listing of traits or characteristics of students that could be the basis of bullying. Topics include support for and concerns about enumeration, research on the effectiveness of enumerating anti-bullying policy, and key considerations and actions for effective implementation of all anti-bullying policies.

Contact: National Center for HIV/AIDS, Viral Hepatits, STD, and TB Prevention, Division of Adolescent and School Health, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 4770 Buford Highway, N.E., Mailstop K-29, Atlanta, GA 30341-3724, Telephone: 800-232-4636 Secondary Telephone: (888) 232-6348 E-mail: cdcinfo@cdc.gov Web Site: http://www.cdc.gov/healthyyouth Available from the website.

Keywords: Bullying, Local government, Policy development, Public policy, Research, School districts, State legislation, Students

Wilking C. 2016. How state plumbing codes can increase access to drinking water in schools. Oakland, CA: ChangeLab Solutions, 7 pp.

Annotation: This fact sheet for policymakers and advocates describes how to use state plumbing codes to modernize school drinking water infrastructure and improve overall child health. Topics include moving beyond the traditional drinking fountain, drinking water infrastructure policies, water fountain requirements, bottle fillers and bottle-filler policies including special considerations for elementary schools, using facilities data to drive policy change, and water filtration considerations. Survey questions that school facilities can use to collect drinking water infrastructure information and sample policy language are provided.

Contact: ChangeLab Solutions, 2201 Broadway, Suite 502, Oakland, CA 94612, Telephone: (510) 302-3380 Web Site: http://changelabsolutions.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Advocacy, Children, Data collection, Facilities, Models, Plumbing codes, Policy development, School districts, Schools, Standards, Water

Oregon Health Authority, Oral Health Program. 2016. Certification for local school dental sealant programs. Portland, OR: Oregon Health Authority, 6 pp.

Annotation: This document presents the final text rule requiring local school-based dental sealant programs (SBSPs) in Oregon to be certified by the Oregon Health Authority before they can provide dental sealants. Contents include guidance on the requirements for certification, the application process for certification and recertification, monitoring of SBSPs, and decertification or pro- visional certification for programs that are out of compliance. Information about certification and clinical training is also available.

Contact: Oregon Health Authority, Oral Health Program, 800 N.E. Oregon Street, Suite 850, Portland, OR 97232, Telephone: (971) 673-0348 Secondary Telephone: (971) 673-0372 Fax: (971) 673-0240 E-mail: oral.health@state.or.us Web Site: https://public.health.oregon.gov/PreventionWellness/oralhealth/Pages/index.aspx Available from the website.

Keywords: Administrative policy, Certification, Dental sealants, Health services delivery, Oral health, Oregon, Preventive health services, Regulations, School age children, School districts, School health programs, Schools, Standards, State legislation, Training

Hamilton J. 2016. Children’s Oral Healthcare Access Program [final report]. Cooperstown, NY: Mary Imogene Bassett Hospital, 22 pp.

Annotation: This report describes a project to expand preventive school-based oral health services to include restorative care in four high-need rural school districts in New York. Topics include delivery-system design, interdisciplinary care, client/community education, continuous quality improvement, sustainability, evaluation, and resources and capabilities. Appendices include the project services timeline, a risk-assessment tool, a workflow diagram, enrollment and consent forms, posters, a brochure, video links, promotional materials, a satisfaction survey, and a press release. The process, outcome, and impact indicators/minimal data set is also provided. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Maternal and Child Oral Health Resource Center, Georgetown University, Box 571272, Washington, DC 20057-1272, Telephone: (202) 784-9771 E-mail: OHRCinfo@georgetown.edu Web Site: https://www.mchoralhealth.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Comprehensive health care, Dental care, Final reports, Health services delivery, Interdisciplinary approach, Local initiatives, Model programs, New York, Oral health, Program improvement, Quality assurance, Rural population, School based clinics, School districts, Service integration, Systems development

Barzaga C. 2016. Children’s Oral Healthcare Access Program [final report]. Pomona, CA: Center for Oral Health, 19 pp. plus appendices.

Annotation: This report describes a project to implement comprehensive oral health services in two school-based health centers operating in the Los Angeles Unified School District. Topics include delivery-system design, interdisciplinary care, client/community education, continuous quality improvement (CQI), sustainability, evaluation, and resources and capabilities. Appendices include the CQI plan, integration report, operations manual, and spatial analysis. A break-even analysis and process, outcome, and impact indicators/minimal data set are also provided. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Maternal and Child Oral Health Resource Center, Georgetown University, Box 571272, Washington, DC 20057-1272, Telephone: (202) 784-9771 E-mail: OHRCinfo@georgetown.edu Web Site: https://www.mchoralhealth.org Available from the website.

Keywords: California, Comprehensive health care, Dental care, Final reports, Health services delivery, Interdisciplinary approach, Local initiatives, Model programs, Oral health, Program improvement, Quality assurance, School based clinics, School districts, Service integration, Systems development, Urban population

Bruski K. 2016. Children’s Oral Healthcare Access Program (COHAP) [final report]. Suisun City, CA: Solano Coalition for Better Health, 45 pp.

Annotation: This report describes a coalition-led project to integrate comprehensive oral health services into an existing school-based health center in the Vallejo City Unified School District in California. Topics include delivery-system design, interdisciplinary care, client/community education, continuous quality improvement (CQI), sustainability, evaluation, and resources and capabilities. The project logic model, marketing tools, classroom-education materials, a performance-improvement-committee definition and plan, an appointment agreement and no show-policy, a CQI plan, and process and outcome data elements are included. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Maternal and Child Oral Health Resource Center, Georgetown University, Box 571272, Washington, DC 20057-1272, Telephone: (202) 784-9771 E-mail: OHRCinfo@georgetown.edu Web Site: https://www.mchoralhealth.org Available from the website.

Keywords: California, Comprehensive health care, Dental care, Final reports, Health services delivery, Interdisciplinary approach, Local initiatives, Model programs, Oral health, Program improvement, Quality assurance, School districts, Service integration, Systems development, Urban population

Major E. 2016. School Based Comprehensive Oral Health Services Grant Program final report. Frisco, CO: Summit Community Care Clinic, 17 pp.

Annotation: This report describes a project to provide access to preventive and restorative oral health care, demonstrate a decrease in dental caries incidence, show an increase in oral health literacy, and create a financially sustainable oral health program for children in Summit County, CO. Topics include delivery-system design, interdisciplinary care, client/community education, continuous quality improvement, sustainability, evaluation, and resources and capabilities. Appendices include a memorandum of understanding, enrollment and send-home forms, a permission form in English and Spanish, a screening survey tool, a student quiz, and a list of advisory board members. The process, outcome, and impact indicators/minimal data set is also provided. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Maternal and Child Oral Health Resource Center, Georgetown University, Box 571272, Washington, DC 20057-1272, Telephone: (202) 784-9771 E-mail: OHRCinfo@georgetown.edu Web Site: https://www.mchoralhealth.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Colorado, Comprehensive health care, Dental care, Final reports, Financing, Health services delivery, Interdisciplinary approach, Local initiatives, Model programs, Oral health, Program improvement, Quality assurance, Rural population, School districts, Service integration, Spanish language materials, Systems development

U.S. Department of Education, Office for Civil Rights. 2016. 2013-2014 civil rights data collection: A first look–Key data on equity and opportunity gaps in our nation's public schools. Washington, DC: U.S. Department of Education, Office for Civil Rights, 13 pp.

Annotation: This report summarizes results from a survey of all public schools and school districts in the United States to measure student access to courses, programs, instructional and other staff, and resources that impact education equity and opportunity for students. Topics include school climate factors such as student discipline and bullying and harassment. Additional topics include restraint and seclusion, early learning, college and career readiness, chronic student absenteeism, education in justice facilities, and teacher staffing and equity.

Contact: U.S. Department of Education, Office for Civil Rights, Lyndon Baines Johnson Department of Education Building, 400 Maryland Avenue, S.W., Washington, DC 20202-1100, Telephone: (800) 421-3481 Fax: (202) 453-6012 E-mail: OCR@ed.gov Web Site: http://www2.ed.gov/about/offices/list/ocr/index.html Available from the website.

Keywords: Bullying, Data analysis, Discipline, Equal opportunities, Learning, Measures, Public education, Public schools, School districts, Students

Kann L, Olsen EO, McManus T, Harris WA, Shanklin SL, Flint KH, Queen B, Lowry R, Chyen D, Whittle L, Thornton J, Lim C, Yamakawa Y, Brenner N, Zaza S. 2016. Sexual identify, sex of sexual contacts, and health-related behaviors among students in grades 9–12: United States and selected sites, 2015. MMWR Surveillance Summaries 65(9):1–202,

Annotation: This report summarizes results for 118 health-related behaviors plus obesity, overweight, and asthma by sexual identity and sex of sexual contacts from the 2015 national Youth Risk Behavior Survey, 25 state surveys, and 19 large urban school district surveys conducted among students in grades 9–12. Contents include a description of the Youth Risk Behavior Surveillance System, survey methodology, and survey results for the prevalence of health-risk behaviors among sexual minority students compared with nonsexual minority students. Recommendations for reducing disparities in health-risk behaviors among sexual minority students are also included.

Contact: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 1600 Clifton Road, Atlanta, GA 30329-4027, Telephone: (800) 232-4636 Secondary Telephone: (888) 232-6348 E-mail: cdcinfo@cdc.gov Web Site: http://www.cdc.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent health, Adolescent sexuality, Adolescents, Comparative analysis, Health behavior, Health surveys, Individual characteristics, Minority groups, National surveys, Population surveillance, Prevalence, Risk factors, Risk taking, School districts, School surveys, Sex factors, Sexual behavior, Sexual health, Sexual identity, Sexual partners, State surveys, Statistical data, Urban population

Piekarz E, Schermbeck R, Young SK, Leider J, Ziemann M, Chriqui JF. 2016. School district wellness policies: Evaluating progress and potential for improving children's health eight years after the federal mandate–Volume 4. Chicago, IL: University of Illinois at Chicago, Institute for Health Research and Policy, 184 pp.

Annotation: This monograph reports key findings from a comprehensive, ongoing, nationwide evaluation of written school district wellness policies. Contents include data from school years 2006–2007 through 2013–2014, the first eight years following the required implementation data for wellness policies. Topics include background on the federal requirement for school district wellness policies, methodology for assessing policy strength and district characteristics, comprehensiveness and strength of wellness policies, key findings of wellness policy provisions, and future research needs.

Contact: University of Illinois at Chicago, Institute for Health Research and Policy, 1747 West Roosevelt Road, 5th Floor, Chicago, IL 60608-1264, Telephone: (312) 996-7222 Secondary Telephone: (866) 757-4507 Fax: (312) 996-2703 E-mail: IHRPinfo@uic.edu Web Site: http://www.ihrp.uic.edu Available from the website.

Keywords: Federal legislation, Health policy, Nutrition education, Physical activity, Physical education, Policy development, Regulations, Research, School districts, School food services, Trends

Chiang RJ. 2016. A guide for incorporating health & wellness into school improvement plans. Atlanta, GA: National Association of Chronic Disease Directors, 30 pp.

Annotation: This guide for public health agencies and other partners the purpose and role of improvement plans in schools and districts. The guide also outlines opportunities to incorporate health and wellness-related goals and aligned activities into school improvement plans and provides examples from schools and districts that have done it.

Contact: National Association of Chronic Disease Directors, 2200 Century Parkway, Suite 250, Atlanta, GA 30345, Telephone: (770) 458-7400 Web Site: http://www.chronicdisease.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Collaboration, Educational objectives, Goals, Health objectives, Planning, Program improvement, Public private partnerships, School districts, Schools, Systems development

SHAPE America. 2016. Answering frequently asked questions about adapted physical education. Reston, VA: SHAPE America, 20 pp.

Annotation: This guidance document answers common questions about providing physical education services for students with disabilities. The document was developed as a resource for physical educators, adapted physical educators, school district administrators, and parents as they work to provide consistent adapted physical education services for students with disabilities. Contents include descriptions of advocacy resources, legal guidelines, teaching tips, and commonly used motor assessments.

Contact: SHAPE America–Society of Health and Physical Educators, 1900 Association Drive, Reston, VA 20191-1598, Telephone: (800) 213-7193 Fax: (703) 476-9527 E-mail: Web Site: http://www.shapeamerica.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Assessments, Disabilities, Learning, Legal definitions, Motor development, Physical activity, Physical education, Resources for professionals, School districts, Service delivery systems, Students, Teaching

Center for Mental Health in Schools. 2016. Improving ESSA planning for student and learning supports. Los Angeles, CA: Center for Mental Health in Schools, 7 pp. (Research for school improvement and transformation: Policy notes)

Annotation: This document describes a framework for developing a comprehensive and equitable system to address barriers to student learning and teaching. The framework comprises student and learning supports within the context of a continuum of interconnected subsystems that promote healthy development and prevent problems, intervene early, and treat severe and chronic problems. Contents include how organizational and operational infrastructures can be reworked to enable the development, implementation, and sustainability of the approach.

Contact: Center for Mental Health in Schools, UCLA School Mental Health Project, Box 951563, Los Angeles, CA 90095-1563, Telephone: (310) 825-3634 Secondary Telephone: (866) 846-4843 Fax: (310) 206-8716 E-mail: smhp@ucla.edu Web Site: http://smhp.psych.ucla.edu Available from the website.

Keywords: Accountability, Barriers, Child development, Collaboration, Early intervention, Equal opportunities, Health promotion, Interdisciplinary approach, Learning, Organizational change, Policy development, Program improvement, Program planning, Resource allocation, School districts, Service integration, Standards, Students, Systems development, Teaching

Salud America!. 2016. 4 easy steps to push for open use at your school. San Antonio, TX: Salud America!, 2 pp. (Salud America toolkit)

Annotation: This toolkit provides step-by-step instructions for initiating a conversation with school district leaders about "open use," a policy that allows free community access to school district property for individual play and physical activity without a partnership or agreement with another public entity or a third party. The toolkit also links to resources such as community examples of open use policy (or shared use agreement; a model open use policy for school districts; and an active spaces research review, issue brief, and infographics.

Contact: Salud America!, University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, Institute for Health Promotion Research, 7411 John Smith, Suite 1000, San Antonio, TX 78229, Telephone: (210) 562-6500 Fax: (210) 562-6545 E-mail: saludamerica@uthscsa.edu Web Site: http://salud-america.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Boards of education, Child health, Community action, Health policy, Health promotion, Models, Physical activity, Policy development, School districts

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This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number U02MC31613, MCH Advanced Education Policy, $3.5 M. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.