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Strengthening the evidence for maternal and child health programs

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Items in this list may be obtained from the sources cited. Contact information reflects the most current data about the source that has been provided to the MCH Digital Library.


Displaying records 1 through 18 (18 total).

Children's Defense Fund. 2015. Children in the states. Washington, DC: Children's Defense Fund, multiple items.

Annotation: This report lists statistics by state for children participating in: federally subsidized programs, the National School Lunch program during FY 1996, the School Breakfast Program during FY 1996, and the WIC Food program during FY 1996. For each state there is also a page listing statistics in the form of "every 23 hours a baby died, every 7 days a youth committed suicide." These are for infant morbidity and mortality, violence, lack of prenatal care, child abuse, lack of health insurance, and teenage and unmarried mothers.

Contact: Children's Defense Fund, 25 E Street, N.W., Washington, DC 20001, Telephone: (202) 628-8787 Secondary Telephone: (800) 233-1200 E-mail: cdfinfo@childrensdefense.org Web Site: http://www.childrensdefense.org $5.95 plus $3.00 shipping and handling for the first item ordered, and $1.00 for each additional item ordered.

Keywords: Child health, Child welfare, Federal programs, Health insurance, School breakfast programs, School lunch programs, Statistics, Violence, WIC Program

Levin M, Neuberger Z. 2013. Community eligibility: Making high-poverty schools hunger free. Washington, DC: Food Action and Research Center, Center on Budget and Policy Priorities, 38 pp.

Annotation: This paper provides information on the concept of community eligibility in making it easier for low-income children in high-poverty schools to get free meals. It describes how community eligibility works, presents data on its impact, and lists resources on best practices for implementing the option.

Contact: Food Research and Action Center, 1875 Connecticut Avenue, N.W., Suite 540, Washington, DC 20009, Telephone: (202) 986-2200 Fax: (202) 986-2525 Web Site: http://www.frac.org/ Available from the website.

Keywords: Child nutrition, Children, Community role, Eligibility determination, Hunger, Low income groups, School breakfast programs, School lunch programs

Mathematica Policy Research. 2013. School Nutrition Dietary Assessment Study-IV (SDNA-IV). Princeton, NJ: Mathematica Policy Research, 4 items.

Annotation: This website provides information about the School Nutrition Dietary Assessment Study-IV, which examines the nutritional quality of meals and snacks offered to students in the National School Lunch Program and the School Breakfast Program. The website includes background about the study, a list of related publications, and a webinar with presentation slides.

Contact: Mathematica Policy Research, P.O. Box 2393, Princeton, NJ 08543-2393, Telephone: (609) 799-3535 Fax: (609) 799-0005 E-mail: info@mathematica-mpr.com Web Site: http://www.mathematica-mpr.com Available from the website.

Keywords: Low income groups, Nutrition, Public policy, Research, School breakfast programs, School health, School lunch programs

U.S. Food and Nutrition Service. 2012. Nutrition standards in the National School Lunch and School Breakfast Programs: Final rule. Alexandria, VA: U.S. Food and Nutrition Service, 80 pp.

Annotation: This final rule updates the meal patterns and nutrition standards for the National School Lunch and School Breakfast Programs to align them with the Dietary Guidelines for Americans. This rule requires most schools to increase the availability of fruits, vegetables, whole grains, and fat-free and low-fat fluid milk in school meals; reduce the levels of sodium, saturated fat and trans fat in meals; and meet the nutrition needs of school children within their calorie requirements. These improvements to the school meal programs are based on recommendations made by the Institute of Medicine of the National Academies and are intended to enhance the diet and health of school children while helping to reduce the upward trend in childhood obesity.

Contact: U.S. Food and Nutrition Service, 3101 Park Center Drive, Alexandria, VA 22302, Web Site: http://www.fns.usda.gov/fns Available from the website.

Keywords: Child nutrition, Dietary guidelines, Obesity, Prevention services, School breakfast programs, School lunch programs, Standards

Cervantes W. 2011. Children of immigrants and nutrition supports. Washington, DC: First Focus, 2 pp.

Annotation: This paper discusses food insecurity among children of immigrants, its consequences, and programs that are available to help. The paper explains why immigrant parents frequently fail to make use of such programs, even if they are eligible; why some programs are more successful than others at enrolling immigrant families; and the effect of the Healthy, Hunger-Free Kids Act.

Contact: First Focus, 1400 Eye Street, N.W., Suite 650, Washington, DC 20005, Telephone: (202) 657-0670 Fax: (202) 657-0671 Web Site: http://www.firstfocus.net Available from the website.

Keywords: Children, Eligibility, Enrollment, Hunger, Immigrants, Low income groups, Outreach, Parents, Poverty, Programs, School breakfast programs, School lunch programs, Supplemental food programs, WIC program

Stallings VA, Suitor CW, Taylor CL, eds.; Institute of Medicine, Committee on Nutrition Standards for National School Lunch and Breakfast Programs. 2010. School meals: Building blocks for healthy children. Washington, DC: National Academies Press, 380 pp.

Annotation: This report provides recommendations for the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) on revising its standards and requirements so that school meals are more healthful. The recommendations are based on a review and assessment of Dietary Reference Intakes (a system of nutrition recommendations from the Institute of Medicine) and the 2005 Dietary Guidelines for Americans (jointly prepared by the USDA and the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services). The eight recommendations in the report update the National School Lunch Program (NSLP) and School Breakfast Program (SBP) nutrition standards and meal requirements approved in 1995; shift the focus toward meeting recommendations in the 2005 Dietary Guidelines; emphasize the need for effective implementation; and identify key research topics. The recommendations encompass standards for menu planning and standards for meals as selected by the student (in contrast to those that are simply offered to students). Seventeen appendixes include sample menus, data tales, definitions, and comparisons between the existing guidelines and proposed revisions for school meal preparation.

Contact: National Academies Press, 500 Fifth Street, N.W., Keck 360, Washington, DC 20001, Telephone: (202) 334-3313 Secondary Telephone: (888) 624-8373 Fax: (202) 334-2451 E-mail: customer_service@nap.edu Web Site: http://www.nap.edu Available from the website.

Keywords: Child health promotion, Data, Dietary guidelines, Federal programs, Nutrition assessment, Nutrition monitoring, Nutrition programs, Program evaluation, School age children, School breakfast programs, School food services, School lunch programs

Potamites E, Gordon A. 2010. Children's food security and intakes from school meals. Princeton, NJ: Mathematica, ca. 135 pp. (Contractor and cooperator report no. 61)

Annotation: This report describes a study that examined the contributions of school meals to the food and nutrient intake of children in food-secure, marginally secure, and food-insecure households. The report includes a description of the data and methods, discusses characteristics of food-insecure and marginally secure students, compares dietary intakes by food security status, and discusses the percentage of school lunch foods consumed and food security and breakfast skipping.

Contact: National Agricultural Library, Abraham Lincoln Building, 10301 Baltimore Avenue, Beltsville, MD 20705-2351, Telephone: (301) 504-5755 Secondary Telephone: (301) 504-6856 Fax: (301) 504-6927 E-mail: lmooney@nal.usda.gov Web Site: http://www.nal.usda.gov/ Available from the website.

Keywords: Child health, Food consumption, Hunger, Low income groups, Nutrition, Research, School breakfast programs, School lunch programs

Cooper R, Levin M. 2009. School breakfast scorecard: School year 2008-2009. Washington, DC: Food Research and Action Center, 20 pp.

Annotation: This report analyzes school breakfast participation for the 2008-2009 school year. The report provides information about who is eligible for the federal School Breakfast Program, discusses findings of the study, discusses child nutrition reauthorization, and provides school meals legislation by state as well as other state-by-state information.

Contact: Food Research and Action Center, 1875 Connecticut Avenue, N.W., Suite 540, Washington, DC 20009, Telephone: (202) 986-2200 Fax: (202) 986-2525 Web Site: http://www.frac.org/ Available from the website.

Keywords: Children, Costs, Eligibility, Federal programs, Legislation, Low income groups, Nutrition, School breakfast programs, School-age children, State programs

Pekruhn C. 2009. Preventing childhood obesity: A school health policy guide . Alexandria, VA: Center for Safe and Healthy Schools, National Association of State Boards of Education, 24 pp.

Annotation: This policy guide, directed to schools, quantitatively and qualitatively overviews the childhood obesity epidemic, provides rationale for obesity prevention programs to policy-makers at all government levels, suggests policies to promote physical education and activity in schools, recommends policies to promote nutrition and healthy eating, and submits additional policies to follow the implementation of the author's primary recommendations.

Contact: Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, 50 College Road East, Princeton, NJ 08540-6614, Telephone: (877) 843-7953 Fax: Web Site: http://www.rwjf.org Available from the website, also available for $12 plus $4.50 shipping and handling..

Keywords: Adolescent health, Adolescent nutrition, Child nutrition, Eating disorders, Health education, Nutrition education, Obesity, Public policy, School breakfast programs, School lunch programs, Schools, Weight management

Moore Q, Hulsey L, Ponza M. 2009. Factors associated with school meal participation and the relationship between different participation measures. Princeton, NJ: Mathematica, ca. 170 pp. (Contractor and cooperator report no. 53)

Annotation: This report investigates three aspects of student participation in the National School Lunch Program (NSLP) and School Breakfast Program (SBP) using data on students certified for free and reduced-price meals during the 2005–2006 school year. The report examines the factors that influence students' participation decisions, the relationship between school meal certification status and participation, and the extent to which parent reports of their children's participation accurately represent actual school meal participation.

Contact: Mathematica Policy Research, P.O. Box 2393, Princeton, NJ 08543-2393, Telephone: (609) 799-3535 Fax: (609) 799-0005 E-mail: info@mathematica-mpr.com Web Site: http://www.mathematica-mpr.com Available from the website.

Keywords: Data, Federal programs, Food preferences, Low income groups, National surveys, School breakfast programs, School lunch programs

Bartfield J, Kim, M, Ryu JH, Ahn H. 2009. The school breakfast program: Participation and impacts. Washington, DC: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Economic Research Service, 54 pp. (Contractor and cooperator report No. (CCR-54))

Annotation: This report examines the determinants of participation in the School Breakfast Program among third grade public school students, compares participation to the School Lunch Program, as well as the impacts of the program on food insecurity and children's risk of skipping breakfast. Data comes from the Early Longitudinal Childhood Survey.

Contact: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Economic Research Service, 1800 M Street, N.W., Washington, DC 20036-5831, Telephone: (202) 694-5050 E-mail: infocenterers.usda.gov Web Site: http://www.ers.usda.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Children, Federal programs, Food consumption, Nutrition programs, School breakfast programs

U.S. Government Accountability Office. 2009. School meal programs: Experiences of the states and districts that eliminated reduced-price fees. Washington, DC: U.S. Government Accountability Office, 38 pp.

Annotation: This report provides information about (1) what is known about the states and districts that have instituted programs, known as ERP programs, to eliminate the reduced-price fee for school meals (instead providing free meals to students eligible for the reduced fee); (2) the experiences of states and districts that have implemented such programs, with respect to participation and costs; and (3) the factors that may help or hinder the establishment or continuation of ERP programs. The report presents findings in brief, background, detailed findings, and the objectives, scope, and methodology.

Contact: U.S. Government Accountability Office, 441 G Street, N.W., Washington, DC 20548, Telephone: (202) 512-3000 Secondary Telephone: E-mail: contact@gao.gov Web Site: http://www.gao.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Child health, Costs, Federal programs, Low income groups, Nutrition, School age children, School breakfast programs, School lunch programs, State programs

Cooper R, Levin M. 2009. School breakfast in America's big cities. Washington, DC: Food Research and Action Center, 16 pp.

Annotation: This report examines the performance of school breakfast programs in 25 large urban school districts during the 2008-09 school year, based on the results of a survey sent to food service staff by the Food Research and Action Center. The aim of the report is to monitor urban schools' progress in increasing breakfast participation among low-income students. Included in the report are statistics on the percentage of low-income children receiving breakfast in school; barriers to participation; promising practices case studies; and recommendations for policymakers and urban school district administrators are also provided.

Contact: Food Research and Action Center, 1875 Connecticut Avenue, N.W., Suite 540, Washington, DC 20009, Telephone: (202) 986-2200 Fax: (202) 986-2525 Web Site: http://www.frac.org/ Available from the website.

Keywords: Low income groups, Nutrition programs, School breakfast programs, School health, Surveys, Urban schools

Millimet DL, Tchernis R, Husain M. 2008. School nutrition programs and the incidence of childhood obesity. Cambridge, MA: National Bureau of Economic REsearch, 53 pp. (NBER working paper series no. 14297)

Annotation: This paper uses data on over 13,500 early-elementary-school children to assess the relationship between School Breakfast Program and National School Lunch Program participation and child weight. The paper provides background information (on the school nutrition programs themselves as well as on the previous literature), presents a theoretical framework for thinking about school nutrition programs, describes the empirical methodology and data, and presents results.

Contact: National Bureau of Economic Research, 1050 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, MA 02138-5398, Telephone: (617) 868-3900 Fax: (617) 868-2742 E-mail: info@nber.org Web Site: http://www.nber.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Body weight, Child health, Low income groups, Nutrition, Obesity, Research, School age children, School breakfast programs, School lunch programs

Rosso R, Weill J. 2007. State of the States: A profile of food and nutrition programs across the nation. Washington, DC: Food Research and Action Center, annual.

Annotation: This report provides information on federal food and nutrition programs throughout the United States. Statistics are provided for the United States as a whole and for each state in the following areas: percentage of food-insecure households, demographics, and participation in the following programs: School Breakfast Program, National School Lunch Program, Summer Nutrition Program, Food Stamp Program, WIC, Child and Adult Care Food Program, The Emergency Food Assistance Program, and the Commodity Supplemental Food Program. Additional statistical information is presented in tables at the end of the report. A list of sources is included.

Contact: Food Research and Action Center, 1875 Connecticut Avenue, N.W., Suite 540, Washington, DC 20009, Telephone: (202) 986-2200 Fax: (202) 986-2525 Web Site: http://www.frac.org/ $12; also available from the website.

Keywords: Child nutrition programs, Commodity Supplemental Food Program, Federal programs, Food, Food Stamp Program, Hunger, Nutrition, Nutrition programs, Poverty, School breakfast programs, School lunch programs, WIC Program

Food Research and Action Center. [2004]. Afterschool guide: Nourish their bodies, feed their minds. Washington, DC: Food Research and Action Center, 33 pp.

Annotation: This manual explains the basics of after-school nutrition programs. The manual offers a step-by-step guide for how to access funding for these programs and provides information on the resources available to after-school programs for nutrition education. The manual discusses (1) why children need after-school programs, (2) why nutrition is crucial to after-school success, (3) how federal child nutrition programs can help, (4) what health and safety requirements apply, (5) how to participate in the National School Lunch Program, (6) how to participate in the Child and Adult Care Food Program, (7) how to participate in summer nutrition programs, and (8) how to provide nutrition education. The manual includes one appendix: state child nutrition agencies.

Contact: Food Research and Action Center, 1875 Connecticut Avenue, N.W., Suite 540, Washington, DC 20009, Telephone: (202) 986-2200 Fax: (202) 986-2525 Web Site: http://www.frac.org/ Available from the website.

Keywords: Child health, Child nutrition programs, Federal programs, Financing, Nutrition, Nutrition education, School age child care, School age children, School breakfast programs, School lunch programs, State agencies

Food Research and Action Center. 2004-. Hunger doesn't take a vacation: Summer nutrition status report. Washington, DC: Food Research and Action Center, annual.

Annotation: This report provides information on the federal summer nutrition programs, which are designed to provide children from low-income families with the kind of nutritious meals and snacks during the summer that they receive throughout the school year. The report presents major findings, describes the programs and why they are important, discusses national and state trends in program participation and children who are not being served, presents ideas for increasing participation, and offers a conclusion. Statistical information is presented in several tables in the appendices. In addition to these tables, the appendices include a discussion of improvements to the Summer Food Service Program enacted by the Child Nutrition and WIC Reauthorization Act of 2004, three model programs, and technical notes.

Contact: Food Research and Action Center, 1875 Connecticut Avenue, N.W., Suite 540, Washington, DC 20009, Telephone: (202) 986-2200 Fax: (202) 986-2525 Web Site: http://www.frac.org/ Available from the website.

Keywords: Child health, Child nutrition programs, Community programs, Federal programs, Low income groups, Nutrition, Participation, School age children, School breakfast programs, School lunch programs, Snacks, State programs, Trends

Bhattacharya J, Currie J, Haider SJ. 2004. Evaluating the impact of school nutrition programs: Final report. Washington, DC: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Economic Research Service, 53 pp.

Annotation: This report describes a study that developed estimates of the efficacy of school nutrition programs in improving a broad range of dietary outcomes by comparing the national status of students and their families during the school year with the status when school is out. The report includes the following main sections: (1) the data, (2) the evaluation methodology, (3) regression results for evaluating school nutrition programs, (4) school nutrition programs: a family perspective, and (5) discussion and conclusion. Statistical information is presented in figures and tables grouped together at the end of the report. The appendix includes variable construction, empirical nutrition-income relationships, and unweighted regression results. The report also includes references.

Contact: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Economic Research Service, 1800 M Street, N.W., Washington, DC 20036-5831, Telephone: (202) 694-5050 E-mail: infocenterers.usda.gov Web Site: http://www.ers.usda.gov Available at no charge; also available from the website. Document Number: USDA E-FAN-04-008.

Keywords: Child health, Data, Diet, Families, Nutrition, School breakfast programs, Students

   

This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number U02MC31613, MCH Advanced Education Policy, $3.5 M. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.