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Strengthen the Evidence for Maternal and Child Health Programs

Search Results: MCHLine

Items in this list may be obtained from the sources cited. Contact information reflects the most current data about the source that has been provided to the MCH Digital Library.


Displaying records 1 through 20 (33 total).

Alliance for a Healthier Generation, Attendance Works, Healthy Schools Campaign. 2017. Framework for action: Addressing chronic absenteeism through ESSA implementation. Chicago, IL: Healthy Schools Campaign, 11 pp.

Martinez A. 2016. School attendance, chronic health conditions and leveraging data for improvement: Recommendations for state education and health departments to address student absenteeism. Atlanta, GA: National Association of Chronic Disease Directors, 23 pp.

Annotation: This document for state education and health departments focuses on ways state school nurse consultants and other state school health personnel can support schools in reducing absences for students with chronic health conditions. Topics include the context and definitions of attendance as a measure, national efforts aimed at improving school attendance, challenges and opportunities related to collecting and using data on school attendance and chronic health conditions, collecting causes of school absence including chronic conditions, and recommendations for connecting school attendance and chronic health conditions to address absenteeism. Examples from Connecticut, Kentucky, and Massachusetts are included.

Contact: National Association of Chronic Disease Directors, 2200 Century Parkway, Suite 250, Atlanta, GA 30345, Telephone: (770) 458-7400 Web Site: https://chronicdisease.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Chronic illnesses and disabilities, Community action, Data analysis, Data collection, Leadership, Management information systems, Measures, Nursing, Program improvement, School attendance, School health services, School nurses, Schools, State departments of education, State health agencies, Students

National Center for HIV/AIDS, Viral Hepatits, STD, and TB Prevention, Division of Adolescent and School Health. [2015]. Bullying and absenteeism: Information for state and local education agencies. Atlanta, GA: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 1 p.

Annotation: This brief for state and local education agencies presents findings from the peer-reviewed literature on associations between in-person and electronic bullying victimization and missing school because of safety concerns among students in high school. The brief also describes what education agencies can do to prevent bullying. Topics include sharing information about potential education-related consequences of bullying, addressing electronic bullying beyond school boundaries, responding to co-occurring types of bullying, and opportunities for collaboration with health professionals.

Contact: National Center for HIV/AIDS, Viral Hepatits, STD, and TB Prevention, Division of Adolescent and School Health, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 4770 Buford Highway, N.E., Mailstop K-29, Atlanta, GA 30341-3724, Telephone: 800-232-4636 Secondary Telephone: (888) 232-6348 E-mail: cdcinfo@cdc.gov Web Site: http://www.cdc.gov/healthyyouth Available from the website.

Keywords: Bullying, Collaboration, High school students, Injury prevention, Research, School attendance, State agencies, Violence prevention

Holtby S, Zahnd E, Grant D. 2015. Ten-year trends in the health of young children in California: 2003 to 2011–2012. Los Angeles, CA: UCLA Center for Health Policy Research, 9 pp.

Annotation: This brief presents 10-year trends in several key health and wellness indicators for infants and children from birth to age 5 in California. The indicators are health insurance coverage, source of medical care, dental visits, overweight-for-age, parents singing and reading to their child and going out with their child, and preschool attendance.

Contact: UCLA Center for Health Policy Research, 10960 Wilshire Boulevard, Suite 1550, Los Angeles, CA 90024, Telephone: (310) 794-0909 Fax: (310) 794-2686 E-mail: chpr@ucla.edu Web Site: http://www.healthpolicy.ucla.edu Available from the website.

Keywords: California, Children, Dental care, Health insurance, Infants, Medical home, Oral health, Preventive health services, Reading, School attendance, School readiness, Trends

U.S. Department of Education, U.S., Department of Health and Human Services, U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development, U.S. Department of Justice. 2015. Every Student, Every Day: Community toolkit to address and eliminate chronic absenteeism. Washington, DC: U.S. Department of Education , 57 pp.

Annotation: This toolkit offers information, suggested action steps, and lists of existing tools and resources—including evidence-based resources—for individuals, leaders, and systems to begin or enhance the work of effective, coordinated community action to address and eliminate chronic absenteeism. Contents include action steps for youth; parents and families; mentors and volunteers; school district superintendents and staff, and school personnel; early learning providers; health care, public health and human service agencies and providers; public housing authorities; juvenile justice and law enforcement; homeless service providers; mayors and local government; and community, faith-based, and philanthropic organizations.

Contact: U.S. Department of Education, 400 Maryland Avenue, S.W., Washington, DC 20202, Telephone: (800) 872-5327 Secondary Telephone: (800) 437-0833 Web Site: http://www.ed.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Collaboration, Community action, Coordination, Resources for professionals, School age children, School attendance, Schools, Systems development

National Collaborative on Education and Health Working Group on Chronic Absenteeism. 2015. Addressing the health-related reasons of chronic absenteeism. Chicago, IL: Healthy Schools Campaign, 6 items.

Annotation: This toolkit focuses on preparing educators -- particularly school district decision makers -- with knowledge and practical guidance for creating meaningful change to address health-related chronic absenteeism. Topics include understanding student health needs, addressing the health-related reasons students are absent, building effective partnerships to support student health, and building capacity. A case study on partnering to ensure students have access to school health services is included.

Contact: Healthy Schools Campaign, 175 N. Franklin, Suite 300, Chicago, IL 60606, Telephone: (312) 419-1810 Fax: (312) 419-1806 Web Site: http://www.healthyschoolscampaign.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Chronic illnesses and disabilities, Collaboration, Community action, Data sources, Environmental influences, Health status, Learning, Needs assessment, Organizational change, Policy development, Program planning, Public private partnerships, School attendance, School districts, Students, Sustainability

Hynes M. 2014. Don't call them dropouts: Understanding the experiences of young people who leave high school before graduation. Washington, DC: America's Promise Alliance, 71 pp.

Annotation: This report presents findings from interviews and surveys of young people across the United States about what leads to leaving school before graduation. Contents include findings on the relationship between interrupted enrollment and family violence and abuse; school safety; violence in the neighborhood; personal and family health challenges; unsupportive or unresponsive school policies; family abandonment (death, incarceration, other events); family absence; instability of place (residential mobility, school mobility, homelessness); school salience; peer influence and support; and school and community support.

Contact: America's Promise Alliance, 1101 Vermont Avenue, N.W., Suite 900, Washington, DC 20005, Telephone: (202) 657-0600 Fax: (202) 657-0601 E-mail: info@americaspromise.org Web Site: http://www.americaspromise.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Academic achievement, Adolescents, Adverse effects, Educational attainment, Graduation, Life course, National surveys, Resilience, Risk factors, School attendance, School dropouts, School failure, Social support, Supported employment

Morgan E, Salomon N, Plotkin M, Cohen R. 2014. The school discipline consensus report: Strategies from the field to keep students engaged in school and out of the juvenile justice system. Lexington, KY: Council of State Governments, 436 pp.

Annotation: This report presents strategies to support educators and minimize school systems' dependence on suspension, expulsion, and arrest to manage student behaviors while promoting safe and productive learning environments that improve academic outcomes for all students and reduce their involvement in the juvenile justice system. Topics include conditions for learning, targeted behavioral interventions, school-police partnerships, courts and juvenile justice, information sharing, and data collection.

Contact: Council of State Governments, 2760 Research Park Drive, P. O. Box 11910, Lexington, KY 40578-1910, Telephone: (859) 244-8000 Secondary Telephone: (800) 800-1910 Fax: (859) 244-8001 E-mail: csg@csg.org Web Site: http://www.csg.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Behavior problems, Collaboration, Criminal justice system, Discipline, Juvenile justice, Learning, Policy development, Prevention programs, Public private partnerships, Risk factors, School age children, School attendance, School failure, School role, School safety, Students, Systems development

Wilder Research. 2014. 2012 Minnesota Homeless Study: Homeless children and their families. Saint Paul, MN: Amherst H. Wilder Foundation, 15 pp.

Annotation: This report presents findings on children and their families who are homeless or living in temporary housing programs in Minnesota. Contents include trends on the number of families who are homeless and the number of people in families in sheltered and unsheltered settings. Additional topics include ages of children who are homeless; race and ethnicity of parents who are homeless; children's health, nutrition, and mental health; children's education; parent's housing history and access to housing; parent health and disabilities; and employment and income of parents. A discussion of the need for affordable housing and supportive services is included.

Contact: Amherst H. Wilder Foundation, 451 Lexington Parkway North, Saint Paul, MN 55104, Telephone: (651) 280-2000 Web Site: http://www.wilder.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Access to health care, Children, Families, Family characteristics, Health status, Homeless persons, Homelessness, Housing, Learning, Minnesota, Parents, School attendance, Shelters, State surveys, Statistical data, Trends

Attendance Works. 2014. The power of positive connections: Reducing chronic absence through PEOPLE–Priority Early Outreach for Positive Linkages and Engagement. [no place]: Attendance Works, 13 pp.

Annotation: This toolkit provides recommendations for schools and community partners for preventing chronic absence and outlines key steps for implementing a Priority Early Outreach for Positive Linkages and Engagement (PEOPLE) strategy. Topics include identifying students and families most at risk and helping them build positive relationships that promote regular attendance in conjunction with a broader approach to nurturing a school-wide culture of attendance. The appendix offers specific tips to help district, school, and community leaders advance the approach.

Contact: Attendance Works, Web Site: http://www.attendanceworks.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Advocacy, Community action, Community participation, Family school relations, Family support, Outreach, Peer support programs, Policy development, Relationships, School age children, School attendance, Students

Holt K, Barzel R. 2013. Oral health and learning: When children's oral health suffers, so does their ability to learn (3rd ed.). Washington, DC: National Maternal and Child Oral Health Resource Center, 4 pp.

Annotation: This fact sheet presents information on the effects of poor oral health on learning in school-age children. Topics include the impact of poor oral health on school performance and social relationships, nutrition and learning, school attendance and learning, and programs for improving oral health. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Maternal and Child Oral Health Resource Center, Telephone: (202) 784-9771 E-mail: OHRCinfo@georgetown.edu Web Site: https://www.mchoralhealth.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Academic achievement, Child health programs, Learning, Nutrition, Oral health, School attendance, School-age children, Social interaction

National Women's Law Center. 2009. Access to education for pregnant and parenting students. Washington, DC: National Women's Law Center,

Annotation: This site hosts links to resources that discuss the provisions of Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972 that affirm the rights of pregnant and parenting students and guide schools in their services to that group. It also links to three dropout prevention programs, and links to promising practices. It hosts a video in which an attorney explains the access to education rights of parenting and pregnant students.

Contact: National Women's Law Center, 11 Dupont Circle. N.W., Suite 800, Washington, DC 20036, Telephone: (202) 588-5180 Fax: (202) 588-5185 E-mail: info@nwlc.org Web Site: http://www.nwlc.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent parents, Federal legislation, Pregnant adolescents, School attendance, School dropouts, School role

Seeley K, Tombari ML, Bennett LJ, Dunkle JB. 2009. Peer victimization in schools: A set of quantitative and qualitative studies of the connections among peer victimization, school engagement, truancy, school achievement, and other outcomes. Denver, CO: National Center for School Engagement, 290 pp. (exec. summ. 13 pp.).

Annotation: This report presents findings from three studies that explored the connections among the variables of bullying/peer victimization, school engagement and the school outcomes of attendance and achievement. It includes (1) a review and critical analysis of the literature, (2) a quantitative study of the connection between students being truant, and their experiencing victimization or bullying from their peers in school; and (3) a qualitative study of some young adults who overcame bullying and some who did not. The report also explores teachers' views on bullying, discusses the implications of the studies, and provides recommendations.

Contact: National Center for School Engagement, Partnership for Families & Children, 3532 Franklin, Suite B, Denver, CO 80205, Telephone: (303) 837-8466 x101 E-mail: info@schoolengagement.org Web Site: http://www.schoolengagement.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Academic achievement, Bullying, Literature reviews, School attendance, School role, Studies, Victims

Pourat N, Nicholson G. 2009. Unaffordable dental care is linked to frequent school absences. Los Angeles, CA: UCLA Center for Health Policy Research, 6 pp.

Annotation: This brief presents information on the number of children ages 5–17 who miss school due to an oral health problem, how often they miss school, and key differences among children who miss school compared to those who do not. Topics include the affordability of needed oral health care, dental insurance, family income, oral health status, race and ethnicity, and language. Additional topics include the financial and societal costs of missed school days and policy options to reduce missed school days.

Contact: UCLA Center for Health Policy Research, 10960 Wilshire Boulevard, Suite 1550, Los Angeles, CA 90024, Telephone: (310) 794-0909 Fax: (310) 794-2686 E-mail: chpr@ucla.edu Web Site: http://www.healthpolicy.ucla.edu Available from the website.

Keywords: Academic achievement, Barriers, California, Costs, Dental care, Learning, Oral health, Policy development, School age children, School attendance

National Women's Law Center. 2007. How to keep pregnant and parenting students from dropping out: A primer for schools. Washington, DC: National Women's Law Center, 2 pp.

Annotation: This fact sheet describes school responsibilities under Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972 for pregnant and parenting students related to access to school, extracurricular activities, absences, and specialized support.

Contact: National Women's Law Center, 11 Dupont Circle. N.W., Suite 800, Washington, DC 20036, Telephone: (202) 588-5180 Fax: (202) 588-5185 E-mail: info@nwlc.org Web Site: http://www.nwlc.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent parents, Federal legislation, Pregnant adolescents, School attendance, School dropouts, School role

National Center for Health Statistics. 2000-. Summary health statistics for U. S. children: National Health Interview Survey, 19__. Hyattsville, MD: National Center for Health Statistics, annual. (Vital and health statistics: Series 10, Data from the National Health Interview Survey)

Annotation: The purpose of this report is to provide national estimates for a broad range of health measures for the U.S. civilian noninstitutionalized population of children under age 18. Estimates are presented for asthma, allergies, learning disabilities, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, use of prescription medication, respondent-assessed health status, school-loss days, usual place of medical care, time since last contact with a health professional, selected health care risk factors, and time since last dental contact. The report is divided into the following sections: (1) abstract, (2) introduction, (3) methods, (4) highlights, and (5) references. Two appendices contain technical notes on methods, hypotheses tests, and lists of terms. Statistical information is presented in numerous detailed tables grouped together at the end of the report.

Contact: National Center for Health Statistics, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 3311 Toledo Road, Room 5419, Hyattsville, MD 20782, Telephone: (800) 232-4636 Secondary Telephone: (888) 232-6348 Fax: (301) 458-4020 E-mail: nchsquery@cdc.gov Web Site: http://www.cdc.gov/nchs Available at no charge; also available from the website. Document Number: DHHS (PHS) 2003-1541; 2003-1538; 2002-1526; ISBN 0-8406-0589-7.

Keywords: Allergies, Asthma, Attention deficit disorder, Child health, Dental care, Health surveys, Learning disabilities, Prescription drugs, Risk factors, School attendance, Statistics

American Academy of Pediatrics, Committee on School Health. 1966. Report of the Committee on School Health of the American Academy of Pediatrics. Evanston, IL: American Academy of Pediatrics, 128 pp.

Annotation: This report discusses school health policy, provides background information on school health topics, and outlines some techniques used by school health services. The report was prepared for physicians but will also be of interest to educators. Topics discussed include the relationship between schools and health services; the school health education medical specialty; health screening of students; special school health needs of adolescents; children with special health needs and schools; academic performance and school attendance; physical fitness and sports medicine; the health of school personnel; and cooperation and communication between physicians and educators.

Keywords: Adolescent health, Child health, Children with developmental disabilities, Children with special health care needs, Collaboration, Confidentiality, Education, Emergency medical services for children, Health policy, Health promotion, Health screening, Health screening, Human development, Medical education, Occupational safety and health, Physical fitness, School attendance, School failure, School health education, School health programs, School health services, School personnel, Schools, Sports medicine, Tests

World Health Organization. 1965. Health problems of adolescence: Report of a WHO expert committee. Geneva, Switzerland: World Health Organization, 28 pp. (World Health Organization technical report series; no. 308)

U.S. Children's Bureau, Industrial Division. 1940. Trend of child labor 1937 to 1939. Washington, DC: U.S. Government Printing Office, 17 pp. (Serial no. R 1058)

Johnson ES. 1939. Welfare of families of sugar-beet laborers: A study of child labor and its relation to family work, income, and living conditions in 1935. Washington, DC: U.S. Government Printing Office, 100 pp. (Bureau publication (United States. Children's Bureau); no. 247)

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This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number U02MC31613, MCH Advanced Education Policy, $3.5 M. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.