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Strengthening the evidence for maternal and child health programs

Search Results: MCHLine

Items in this list may be obtained from the sources cited. Contact information reflects the most current data about the source that has been provided to the MCH Digital Library.


Displaying records 1 through 20 (495 total).

McIntire MS, Mitchell JR. n.d.. Comprehensive health care delivery for children and youth: A combined approach. Minneapolis, MN: [University of Minnesota, School of Public Health], Systems Development Project Staff, 7 pp. (Comment series no: 2-1 (41))

Annotation: This paper reports a Children and Youth Project conducted by combining the forces of a medical school and a health department, by maintaining role differentiation in respect to education and service, and by developing a Central Health Record and communication system to develop and increase comprehensive health services for children and youth residing in the target areas of poverty. This paper is produced as part of the documentation and assessment of the effect of P.L. 89-97, Title V. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Keywords: Adolescent health programs, Child health programs, Children and Youth Projects, Communication, Comprehensive health services, Interagency cooperation, Medical records, Medical schools, Poverty, Program evaluation, Public health agencies, Title V programs

Gedgoud JL, McIntire MS. n.d.. Progress report of a combined approach for children and youth services. Minneapolis, MN: [University of Minnesota, School of Public Health], Systems Development Project Staff, 11 pp. (Comment series no: 3-2 (45))

Annotation: This report demonstrates graphically how a combination of a health department and a medical school compress to the national average of all Children and Youth projects. This paper is produced as part of the documentation and assessment of the effect of P.L. 89-97, Title V. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Keywords: Adolescent health programs Comprehensive health services, Child health programs, Children and Youth Projects, Communication, Interagency cooperation, Medical records, Medical schools, Poverty, Program evaluation, Public health agencies, Title V programs

Hubinger J. n.d.. Michigan Model for Improving Pediatric Emergency Medical Services (EMS for Children in Michigan [Final report]. Lansing, MI: Michigan Department of Public Health,

Annotation: This project sought to reduce the number and the impact of childhood injuries, especially those due to fire and violence. Two broad objectiveswere written for year 3 activities, involving methods of training emergency providers (training objective), and public/student education, smoke detector battery distribution, and school injury reporting (injury prevention objective). Materials developed include a 1993 injury prevention calendar, a statewide curriculum for pediatric emergencies, and data reports on prehospital and inpatient studies. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Technical Information Service, U.S. Department of Commerce, 5301 Shawnee Road, Alexandria, VA 22312, Telephone: (703) 605-6050 Secondary Telephone: (888) 584-8332 E-mail: customerservice@ntis.gov Web Site: http://www.ntis.gov Document Number: NTIS PB97-121917.

Keywords: Emergency Medical Services for Children, Emergency Medical Technicians, Injury Prevention, Professional Education in EMSC, School Age Children

Missouri Department of Health and Senior Services, Oral Health Program. n.d.. K-12 oral health education curriculum (Powerpoint presentations). Jefferson City, MO: Missouri Department of Health and Senior Services, Oral Health Program, multiple items.

Annotation: These resources comprise oral health presentations for teachers, school nurses, and other health and education professionals to use in conjunction with Missouri's health-education curriculum. Contents include presentations (in English and Spanish) for use with students in kindergarten through 12th grade. A version targeted toward Native-American students is also available.

Contact: Missouri Department of Health and Senior Services, Oral Health Program, P.O. Box 570, Jefferson City, MO 65102-0570, Telephone: (573) 751-6400 Fax: (573) 751-6010 E-mail: info@health.mo.gov Web Site: http://health.mo.gov/living/families/oralhealth/index.php Available from the website.

Keywords: American Indians, Educational materials, Missouri, Oral health, School age children, School health education, Spanish language materials

American Lung Association. n.d.. Model policy for school districts: Stock bronchodilators. Washington, DC: American Lung Association, 5 pp.

Annotation: This document is designed to help school districts improve the health and academic outcomes of students with asthma. The document provides a framework for developing policies allowing use of stock bronchodilators in schools. Contents include information about implementing a model policy and creating a protocols and procedures document. A model policy template with definitions and conditions for administering, administering and storing, and obtaining stock bronchodilators is also included.

Contact: American Lung Association, 1300 Pennsylvania Ave., N.W., Suite 800, Washington, DC 20004, Telephone: (202) 785-3355 Secondary Telephone: (800) 548-8252 Fax: (202) 452-1805 E-mail: info@lungusa.org Web Site: http://www.lungusa.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Academic achievement, Asthma, Child health, Chronic illnesses and disabilities, Disease management, Models, Policy development, School age children, School districts, School nurses, Schools, Self care

Maryland Department of Health and Mental Hygiene, Office of Oral Health. n.d.. Environmental assessment guidelines. Baltimore, MD: Maryland Department of Health and Mental Hygiene, Office of Oral Health, 1 p.

Annotation: These guidelines provide information about an environmental assessment tool that school-based dental sealant programs or those wishing to launch a school-based dental sealant program can use to help determine whether the environment is conducive to operating such a program. The guidelines explain what the tool is, who it is for, how it can be used, why it should be used, and how often it should be used.

Contact: Maryland Department of Health and Mental Hygiene, Office of Oral Health, 201 West Preston Street, Third Floor, Baltimore, MD 21201, Telephone: (410) 767-5300 Secondary Telephone: (800) 735-2258 Fax: (410) 333-7392 E-mail: https://health.maryland.gov/Pages/contactus.aspx Web Site: http://phpa.dhmh.maryland.gov/oralhealth/Pages/home.aspx Available from the website.

Keywords: Dental care, Dental sealants, Guidelines, Oral health, Prevention, School age children, School health services, State programs, Tooth decay

Healthiest State Initiative. 2020. 5 2 1 0 Healthy Choices Count: Action guide--Health care. Des Moines, IA: Healthiest State Initiative, 15 pp.

Annotation: This guide for health professionals is part of the 5-2-1-0 Healthy Choices Count Program, an evidence-based prevention framework to promote healthy habits. The guide discusses how health professionals can use the 5-2-1-0 method to help children stay healthy. It explains how health professionals can implement the program in five steps: engage, register, implement, share, and check in.

Contact: Healthiest State Initiative, 301 Grand Avenue, Des Moines, IA 50309, Telephone: (515) 650-6854 Web Site: http://www.iowahealthieststate.com Available from the website.

Keywords: Health programs, Nutrition, Physical activity, Prevention, School age children, Young children

Barzel R, Holt K, eds. 2019. Promoting oral health in schools: A resource guide (4th ed.). Washington, DC: National Maternal and Child Oral Health Resource Center, 35 pp.

Annotation: This guide provides resources to help health professionals, educators, parents, and others promote oral health and prevent oral disease in school-age children and adolescents. The guide is divided into two sections. The first section describes materials such as brochures, fact sheets, guidelines, curricula, and reports. The second section lists federal agencies and national organizations that may serve as resources. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Maternal and Child Oral Health Resource Center, Georgetown University, Box 571272, Washington, DC 20057-1272, Telephone: (202) 784-9771 E-mail: OHRCinfo@georgetown.edu Web Site: https://www.mchoralhealth.org Available from the website.

Keywords: , Disease prevention, Health promotion, Oral health, Resources for professionals, School age children, School health services, School linked programs, Young children

DC Health. 2019. Oral health assessment form. Washington, DC: District of Columbia Department of Health, 1 p.

Annotation: This form, for parents and oral health professionals to fill out, provides space to write information about children over age 3 to give the child’s child care facility or school. Part I, for parents to fill out, is for the child’s name, age, birthdate, grade, and child care facility or school name. Part II, for an oral health professional to fill out, is for the child’s oral health status and insurance status. Space for the oral health professional’s name, signature, and stamp, as well as the date of the oral examination, is included.

Contact: District of Columbia Department of Health, 899 North Capitol Street, N.E., Washington, DC 20002, Telephone: (202) 442-5955 Fax: (202) 442-4795 E-mail: doh@dc.gov Web Site: http://doh.dc.gov/ Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent health, Child health, Forms, Oral health, School age children, Young children

American Academy of Pediatrics. 2019. Ways to protect teeth and prevent decay in school-age kids and teens. Itasca, IL: American Academy of Pediatrics, 2 pp.

Annotation: This document, which is geared toward parents, provides information about preventing tooth decay in school-aged children and adolescents. The document offers information about the percentage of children ages 6–8 who have had cavities, by race. Steps to take care of a child's primary and permanent teeth are presented. Information about the benefits of drinking fluoridated water; eating healthy foods; avoiding smoking, vaping, and chewing tobacco; HPV; and wearing a mouthguard during sports is included.

Contact: American Academy of Pediatrics, 345 Park Boulevard, Itasca, IL 60143, Telephone: (630) 626-6000 Secondary Telephone: (847) 434-4000 Fax: (847) 434-8000 Web Site: https://www.aap.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent health, Consumer education materials, Nutrition, Oral health, Prevention, School age children

American Dental Association. 2018. February is National Children's Dental Health Month. Chicago, IL: American Dental Association, Division of Communications, multiple items.

Annotation: These materials are designed to help health professionals and educators raise awareness about the importance of oral health during National Children’s Dental Health Month (February). The 2019 campaign slogan is “Brush and clean in between to build a healthy smile.” Contents include a program-planning guide, press releases, broadcasting tips, sample newspaper articles, posters, and activity sheets in English and Spanish for children and adolescents.

Contact: American Dental Association, 211 East Chicago Avenue, Chicago, IL 60611-2678, Telephone: (312) 440-2500 Fax: (312) 440-7494 E-mail: info@ada.org Web Site: http://www.ada.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Health observances, Health promotion, Materials for children, Oral health, Public awareness campaigns, School age children, Spanish language materials

Children's Health Alliance of Wisconsin. 2018. Wisconsin Seal-A-Smile Administration Manual. Milwaukee, WI: Children's Health Alliance of Wisconsin, 35 pp.

Annotation: This manual provides policies and procedures for all Wisconsin Seal-A-Smile (SAS) grantees, with the goal of helping them administer programs and ensure consistency across programs. The purpose of SAS is to improve the oral health of Wisconsin children through school-based dental sealant programs. Topics include administrative and regulatory guidelines; program requirements; forms, reporting, and recording; and budget and funding information. Information about infection control and safe delivery of oral health care outside the dental office is included in appendices.

Contact: Children's Health Alliance of Wisconsin, 620 South 76th Street, Suite 120, Milwaukee, WI 53214, Telephone: (414) 292-4000 Secondary Telephone: (414) 337-4561 Fax: (414) 231-4972 Web Site: https://www.chawisconsin.org/ Available from the website.

Keywords: Administration, Data collection, Dental sealants, Disease prevention, Forms, Grants management, Oral health, Prevention programs, Reimbursement, School age children, School health programs, School health services, Screening, State programs, Wisconsin

Calanan R, Elzinga-Marshall G, Gry D, Payne E, Mauritson K. 2018. Tooth be told: Colorado's basic screening survey—Children's oral health screening: 2016-17. Denver, CO: Colorado Department of Public Health and Environmenty, 33 pp.

Annotation: This report presents data from a survey of students in kindergarten and third grade in Colorado that included an oral health screening conducted during the 2016–2017 school year. The report provides an introduction to the survey and a summary of main findings; a description of the methodology; and results categorized by caries experience, untreated decay, treatment urgency, and sealants. Trends in oral health outcomes and in oral health disparities by race/ethnicity and school-level socioeconomic status are presented.

Contact: Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment, 4300 Cherry Creek Drive, South, Denver, CO 80246, Telephone: (303) 692-2000 Secondary Telephone: (800) 886-7689 E-mail: cdphe.information@state.co.us Web Site: https://www.colorado.gov/cdphe Available from the website.

Keywords: Colorado, Ethnic factors, Oral health, Racial factors, School age children, Socioeconomic factors, State surveys, Statistical data, Trends

Vidrine S, Hamrick A. 2018. School-based sealant programs: An innovative approach to improve children's oral health. Raleigh, NC: NC Child, 10 pp.

Annotation: This brief explores the impact of dental caries on children’s overall health and academic success and how North Carolina can take steps to improve children’s oral health through the use of school-based dental sealant programs (SBSPs). Topics include the impact of dental caries on children’s health and well-being, evidence-based solutions, SBSPs, the impact of SBSPs on children’s oral health outcomes, and North Carolina considerations. Recommendations for ways that North Carolina can improve children’s oral health and academic outcomes are included.

Contact: NC Child, 3101 Poplarwood Court, Suite 300, Raleigh, NC 27604, Telephone: (919) 834-6623 Web Site: http://www.ncchild.org/ Available from the website.

Keywords: Dental sealants, Disease prevention, North Carolina, Oral health, School age children, School health programs, State programs

School-Based Health Alliance and Oral Health 2020 Network. 2018. Confronting the consent conundrum: Lessons from a school oral health community. Washington DC: School-Based Health Alliance; Boston, MA: Oral Health 2020 Network, 6 pp. (OH2020 white paper)

Annotation: This document presents ideas that emerged from the School-Based Health Alliance initiative, Strengthening School Oral Health Services and Growing the School Oral Health Learning Community, and that resulted in an increase in the number of positive parental consents for school oral health services. The initiative encompassed the 10 largest U.S. school districts, which serve more than 4 million students, including a significant number of students with high needs. The document discusses school engagement, family engagement, community engagement, oral health education, and data collection and use.

Contact: School-Based Health Alliance, 1010 Vermont Avenue, N.W., Suite 600, Washington, DC 20005, Telephone: (202) 638-5872 Secondary Telephone: (888) 286-8727 Fax: (202) 638-5879 E-mail: info@nasbhc.org Web Site: http://www.sbh4all.org Available from the website.

Keywords: , Data collection, Health education, Informed consent, Initiatives, Low income groups, Oral health, School age children, School health services

Ohio Department of Health, Oral Health Program. 2018. Oral health screening survey of third grade schoolchildren in Ohio, 2017-18. Columbus, OH: Ohio Department of Health, Oral Health Program, 11 pp.

Annotation: This data brief reports results of an oral health screening survey of children in third grade conducted by the Ohio Department of Health during school year 2017–2018. The brief presents overall findings and discusses disparities in oral health; access to oral health care; impact on access to oral health care and insurance status on oral health status; percentage of children with a history of tooth decay, untreated tooth decay, and dental sealants in Ohio vs. in the nation as a whole; and survey results compared with Healthy People 2020 objectives. The significance of the findings is also discussed. Statistical data is provided, and a description of study methods is included.

Contact: Ohio Department of Health, Oral Health Program, 246 North High Street, Columbus, OH 43215, Telephone: (614) 466-4180 Fax: (614) 564-2421 E-mail: BCHS@odh.ohio.gov Web Site: https://odh.ohio.gov/wps/portal/gov/odh/know-our-programs/oral-health-program/welcome-to Available from the website.

Keywords: Access to health care, Dental caries, Dental sealants, Health insurance, Ohio, Oral health, School age children, State programs, Statistical data, Surveillance

Alliance for a Healthier Generation, Healthy Schools Campaign. [2017?]. Framework for action: Addressing nutrition and physical activity through ESSA implementation. Chicago, IL: Alliance for a Healthier Generation, Healthy Schools Campaign, 12 pp.

Annotation: This resource is a supplement to “State ESSA Plans to Support Student Health and Wellness: A Framework for Action.” This supplement provides more detailed recommendations for supporting nutrition and physical activity during the school day through the Every Student Succeeds Act implementation.

Contact: Healthy Schools Campaign, 175 N. Franklin, Suite 300, Chicago, IL 60606, Telephone: (312) 419-1810 Fax: (312) 419-1806 Web Site: http://www.healthyschoolscampaign.org

Keywords: Nutrition, Adolescent health, Child health, Physical activity, School age children, School health programs, Students

Vermont Department of Health, Dental Health Services. 2017. Keep Smiling Vermont: The oral health of Vermont's children: 2016-2017. Burlington, VT: Vermont Department of Health, Dental Health Services, 26 pp.

Annotation: This report provides a summary of key survey findings on the oral health of children in Vermont as well as information on the following topics: (1) the Tooth Tutor School-Linked Dental Seal- ant Program, (2) key strategies to improve oral health, and (3) survey methods. Data tables and figures are included.

Contact: Vermont Department of Health, Office of Oral Health, 108 Cherry Street, Burlington, VT 05402, Telephone: (802) 863-7497 Secondary Telephone: (800) 464-4343 Fax: (802) 865-7554 Web Site: http://healthvermont.gov/family/dental/services.aspx Available from the website.

Keywords: Dental care, Health status, Oral health, Population surveillance, School age children, State surveys, Statistical data, Vermont

Connecticut State Dental Association. 2017. Connecticut cares about oral health: An oral health curriculum (rev. ed.). Southington, CT: Connecticut State Dental Association, multiple files.

Annotation: This packet is designed to help educators integrate oral health education into Connecticut's school health curricula. The packet comprises 6 lesson modules for educating students in pre-kindergarten through grade 12 about oral health and healthy behaviors. Each module lists objectives, questions, and related subject areas and can be used individually or in combination with recommended supportive activities and classroom materials. The revised online curriculum has modules for pre-kindergarten, kindergarten and grade 1, grades 2-3, grades 4-5, and grades 6-8.

Contact: Connecticut State Dental Association, 835 West Queen Street, Southington, CT 06489, Telephone: (860) 378-1800 Fax: (860) 378-1807 Web Site: http://www.csda.com Available from the website.

Keywords: Connecticut, Curricula, Oral health, Preschool education, School age children, School health education, State initiatives, Young children

Michael SL, Zavacky F. 2017. Strategies for recess in schools. Reston, VA: SHAPE America–Society of Health and Physical Educators, 16 pp.

Annotation: This document describes strategies for planning and providing recess in schools to help increase participation in physical activity and improve academic achievement. Contents include information about the definition and benefits of recess and national guidance and considerations for recess in schools. Topics include making leadership decisions, communicating and enforcing behavior and safety expectations, creating an environment supportive of physical activity during recess, engaging the school community to support recess, gathering information on recess, and taking action. Additional planning resources, case studies, a video, and infographics are also available.

Contact: SHAPE America–Society of Health and Physical Educators, 1900 Association Drive, Reston, VA 20191-1598, Telephone: (800) 213-7193 Fax: (703) 476-9527 E-mail: Web Site: http://www.shapeamerica.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Academic achievement, Child health, Child safety, Community action, Decision making, Leadership, Multimedia, Physical activity, Policy development, Program planning, School age children, School health, Schools, Students

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This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number U02MC31613, MCH Advanced Education Policy, $3.5 M. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.