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Strengthening the evidence for maternal and child health programs

Search Results: MCHLine

Items in this list may be obtained from the sources cited. Contact information reflects the most current data about the source that has been provided to the MCH Digital Library.


Displaying records 1 through 20 (187 total).

Sudden Unexplained Death in Childhood Program. n.d.. Help for families when an infant or young child dies. Hackensack, NJ: Sudden Unexplained Death in Childhood Program, 2 pp.

Annotation: This brochure is designed for coroners or medical examiners to give to families of an infant or a young child who has died suddenly. It outlines the roles of the professionals that may be involved in investigating the death, gives time estimates for the investigation process, and lists national resources. It can be used for all manners of sudden pediatric deaths. A sample of this brochure is available online; agencies can order a customized version that includes their local information. It is available in three versions: coroner only, medical examiner only, and coroner/medical examiner combined.

Contact: Sudden Unexplained Death in Childhood Foundation, 549 Pompton Avenue, Suite 197, Cedar Grove, NJ 07009, Telephone: (800) 620-SUDC Secondary Telephone: (973) 239-4849 Fax: (973) 559-6191 E-mail: info@sudc.org Web Site: http://www.sudc.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Consumer education materials, Coroners, Death scene investigation, Infants, Medical examiners, Role, Sudden death, Young children

National Organization of State Offices of Rural Health. n.d.. State offices of rural health. [Sterling Heights, MI]: National Organization of State Offices of Rural Health, 1 p.

Annotation: This fact sheet explains what a state office of rural health (SORH) is, goals of a SORH, and why SORHs are important. Topics include how SORHs support and build local capacity and draw attention to the challenges and successes in rural health care and how they support coordination and information sharing on rural health issues within state health agencies.

Contact: Association of State and Territorial Health Officials, 2231 Crystal Drive, Suite 450, Arlington, VA 22202, Telephone: (202) 371-9090 Fax: (571) 527-3189 Web Site: http://www.astho.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Access to health care, Health services delivery, Information dissemination, Public health infrastructure, Role, Rural health, Rural population, Service coordination, State health agencies, State programs, Technical assistance

Golden J. 2018. Babies made us modern: How infants brought America into the twentieth century. New York, NY: Cambridge University Press,

Annotation: This book examines how babies shaped American society and culture and led their families into the modern world to become more accepting of scientific medicine, active consumers, open to new theories of human psychological development, and welcoming of government advice and programs. The book also examines the influence of cultural traditions and religious practices upon the diversity of infant lives, exploring the ways class, race, region, gender, and community shaped life in the nursery and household.

Contact: Cambridge University Press, 32 Avenue of the Americas, New York, NY 10013-2473, Telephone: 212-924-3900 Secondary Telephone: (914) 937-9600 Fax: 212-691-3239 E-mail: information@cup.org Web Site: http://www.cambridge.org/us/

Keywords: Community role, Cultural beliefs, Infants, Regional factors, Religion, Social change, Social factors, Sociocultural factors

O'Connor C. 2017. Working toward well-being: Community approaches to toxic stress. Washington, DC: Center for the Study of Social Policy, Early Childhood LINC Learning Lab on Community Approaches to Toxic Stress, 7 pp.

Annotation: This brief defines toxic stress from a community perspective and presents a framework for a community approach to addressing toxic stress, nested within the broader context of working toward healthy development and well-being. The brief also provides examples of how communities are taking action and recommendations for next steps to promote and further develop comprehensive approaches to toxic stress in communities across the country. Strategies for parents and caregivers; service providers; and multisystem, community partners and policymakers are included.

Contact: Center for the Study of Social Policy, 1575 Eye Street, N.W., Suite 500, Washington, DC 20005, Telephone: (202) 371-1565 Fax: (202) 371-1472 E-mail: info@cssp.org Web Site: http://www.cssp.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Advocacy, Child development, Child health, Communication, Communities, Community action, Community based services, Community role, Coordination, Early childhood, Families, Health education, Leadership, Models, Organizational change, Parents, Policy development, Protective factors, Social change, Stress, Systems development, Young children

Schubel J. 2017. Medicaid helps schools help children. Washington, DC: Center on Budget and Policy Priorities, 7 pp.

Annotation: This brief examines the role of Medicaid in funding critical health-related services for students with disabilities. Topics include providing reimbursement for health care services that are necessary for students with disabilities to succeed in school and ensuring schools' compliance with Individuals with Disabilities Education Act requirements, helping students to stay healthy and succeed academically, and connecting students to coverage. The brief also describes the long-term benefits of Medicaid for eligible children and the potential impact of spending reductions on students, local communities, and state budgets. The appendix contains a table on state and federal Medicaid spending in schools.

Contact: Center on Budget and Policy Priorities, 820 First Street N.E., Suite 510, Washington, DC 20002, Telephone: (202) 408-1080 Fax: (202) 408-1056 E-mail: center@cbpp.org Web Site: http://www.cbpp.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Academic achievement, Chronic illnesses and disabilities, Eligibility, Enrollment, Medicaid, Reimbursement, Role, School health services, Schools, Special health care needs, State programs, Students

Erikson C. 2017. Health workforce research centers: Key findings 2013–2016. Washington, DC: George Washington University, Health Workforce Institute, 32 pp.

Annotation: This report provides an overview of how the collective work of six health work force research centers has contributed to a better understanding of critical health work force challenges. The report describes the establishment of the centers, the evolving health work force configuration, job growth and career paths in middle- and low-skill health occupations, and work force strategies to increase access to quality health care. Topics include the effect of system-level transformations on team roles and human resources, emerging occupations, expanded roles, supply and demand, training needs, career pathways, team models and staffing arrangements, the role of technology in improving access to health care, and the relationship between training location and other factors influencing supply and utilization.

Contact: George Washington University, Health Workforce Institute, 2176 K Street, N.W., Suite 500, Washington, DC 20037, Telephone: (202) 994-3423 Web Site: http://www.gwhwi.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Access to health care, Careers, Educational change, Evolution, Health occupations, Models, Policy development, Professional education, Professional training, Quality assurance, Research, Role, Teamwork, Technology, Work force

National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Division of Population Health. 2017. Managing chronic health conditions in schools: The role of the school nurse. Atlanta, GA: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 3 pp.

Annotation: This fact sheet describes the role of school nurses in improving student academic achievement and decreasing absenteeism by helping students with chronic health conditions manage their condition. Topics include providing direct care such as giving children medications, providing case management, and advocating for students and their families to help them get the resources and support they need.

Contact: National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Division of Population Health, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 1600 Clifton Road, Atlanta, GA 30329-4027, Telephone: (800) 232-4636 Secondary Telephone: (888) 232-6348 E-mail: cdcinfo@cdc.gov Web Site: http://www.cdc.gov/NCCDPHP/dph Available from the website.

Keywords: Academic achievement, Case management, Chronic illnesses and disabilities, Disease management, Elementary schools, Families, Family support services, Health services delivery, Homeless persons, Program coordination, Role, School age children, School nurses, Students

Association of Maternal and Child Health Programs. 2017. National Title V children and youth with special health care needs program profile. Washington, DC: Association of Maternal and Child Health Programs, 15 pp.

Annotation: This report provides a snapshot of Title V Children and Youth with Special Health Care Needs (CYSHCN) programs across the United States. Contents include background and history of CYSHCN programs, recent changes affecting CYSHCN programs, and methods and results from an electronic survey of Title V CYSHCN directors to assess key characteristics of each state's CYSHCN program. Topics include program structure and strengths, roles in systems of care, CYSHCN program partnerships, financing of care for CYSHCN populations and emerging issues for CYSHCN programs.

Contact: Association of Maternal and Child Health Programs, 1825 K Street, N.W., Suite 250, Washington, DC 20006-1202, Telephone: (202) 775-0436 Fax: (202) 478-5120 E-mail: info@amchp.org Web Site: http://www.amchp.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Advocacy, Children with special health care needs, Community based services, Consultation, Cultural competency, Data, Family centered care, Financing, Health care delivery, Health care reform, Health care systems, Health insurance, Leadership, Medicaid managed care, Models, Networking, Pediatric care, Policy development, Program coordination, Program development, Public health infrastructure, Public private partnerships, Quality assurance, Reimbursement, Role, Standards, State MCH programs, Title V programs

Alperin M, Uden-Holman TM, Rodgers KC, eds. 2017. U.S. Public Health Learning Network: Innovative competency-based training for the public health workforce. Pedagogy in Health Promotion: The Scholarship of Teaching and Learning 3(1, Suppl.):5S–87S,

Annotation: This supplement comprises 15 articles focused on the work of the U.S. Public Health Learning Network (PHLN). Contents include commentaries, a reflective piece, descriptive best practices, and original research that describe the work of the regional public health training centers (PHTCs), local performance sites, and National Coordinating Center for Public Health Training, which comprise the PHLN. Topics include recommendations for successful implementation of Public Health 3.0 principles, the role that practice-based experiences such as internships and field placements have on public health students, the role of the PHLN in strengthening the public health work force, and the major areas of activity of the PHTC program.

Contact: Sage Publications, 2455 Teller Road, Thousand Oaks, CA 91320-2218, Telephone: (805) 499-9774 Secondary Telephone: (800)818-7243 Fax: (805) 499-0871 E-mail: order@sagepub.com Web Site: http://www.sagepub.com Available from the website.

Keywords: Health personnel, Learning: Training, Public health, Role, Teaching, Work force

U.S. Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality. 2016–. Guide to improving patient safety in primary care settings by engaging patients and families. Rockville, MD: U.S. Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, multiple items.

Annotation: This guide for primary care health professionals provides four strategies they can adopt to improve patient safety, as well as materials to support adoption. Topics include supporting adoption of teach-back, a technique to ensure health care professionals that they have explained medical information clearly so that patients and their families understand what is communicated to them; helping patients and their families prepare for and become more fully engaged in their medical appointments; engaging with patients and caregivers to create a complete and accurate medical list for addressing medication reconciliation and management issues; and the warm handoff, a transfer of care from one clinician to another, where the handoff occurs in front of the patient and family. Contents include implementation guides, interactive learning modules, posters and handouts, fact sheets, sample processes and procedures, staff checklists, and videos.

Contact: U.S. Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, 5600 Fishers Lane, Rockville, MD 20857, Telephone: (301) 427-1104 Secondary Telephone: (301) 427-1364 Web Site: http://www.ahrq.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Consumer education materials, Family centered care, Health literacy, Participation, Patient care, Physician patient relations, Prevention programs, Primary care, Program improvement, Quality assurance, Resources for professionals, Role, Safety programs

U.S. Department of Education. 2016. Healthy students, promising futures: State and local action steps and practices to improve school-based health. Washington, DC: U.S. Department of Education, 16 pp.

Annotation: This toolkit contains information that details five high impact opportunities for states and local school districts to support communities through collaboration between the education and health sectors, highlighting best practices and key research in both areas. Contents include resources, programs, and services offered by non-governmental organizations.

Contact: U.S. Department of Education, 400 Maryland Avenue, S.W., Washington, DC 20202, Telephone: (800) 872-5327 Secondary Telephone: (800) 437-0833 Web Site: http://www.ed.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Case management, Collaboration, Communities, Community action, Educational reform, Eligibility, Health care reform, Health education, Health insurance, Health services delivery, Hospitals, Medicaid managed care, Needs assessment, Nutrition, Physical activity, Public private partnerships, Reimbursement, Role, School districts, State government, Students

Snyder JE. 2016. Community health workers: Roles and responsibilities in health care delivery system reform. Washington, DC: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Office of the Assistant Secretary for Planning and Evaluation, 23 pp.

Annotation: This report reviews health services research findings on community health workers (CHWs) and considers key challenges for CHWs to improve health care delivery, including oral health care delivery. Topics include major roles for CHWs in the health care system, a national profile of CHWs, evidence on the clinical impact of CHWs, the policy impact potential for CHW interventions, opportunities for reimbursement through Medicaid, and state and health care innovation models.

Contact: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Office of the Assistant Secretary for Planning and Evaluation, Hubert H. Humphrey Building, 200 Independence Avenue, S.W., Room 415 F, Washington, DC 20201, Web Site: http://aspe.hhs.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Allied health personnel, Barriers, Community health aides, Community role, Culturally competent services, Financing, Health care delivery, Health care reform, Home health aides, Low income groups, Medicaid, Minority groups, Oral health, Patient care teams, Policy development, Preventive health services, Program improvement, Reimbursement, Service delivery systems, Standards, Sustainability, Training, Work force

Diop H, Hwang S, Leader D, Silk H, Chie L, Lu E, Stone SL, Flaherty K. 2016. Massachusetts oral health practice guidelines for pregnancy and early childhood. Boston, MA: Massachusetts Department of Public Health, 14 pp.

Annotation: These guidelines provide oral health care recommendations and resources for health professionals caring for pregnant women and young children. Contents include background information about oral diseases; the status of oral health among pregnant women and children in Massachusetts and national and state efforts to improve it; and the role of prenatal care health professionals, oral health professionals, and pediatric care health professionals in improving pregnant women's and children's oral health. Topics include assessing, advising, educating, referring, collaborating, and providing treatment and management. Resources on medication use during pregnancy, sample referral forms, and reproducible handouts on healthy portion sizes and healthy eating during pregnancy are also provided.

Contact: Massachusetts Department of Public Health, Office of Oral Health, 250 Washington Street, 5th Floor, Boston, MA 02108, Telephone: (617) 624-6060 Secondary Telephone: (617) 624-5992 Fax: (617) 624-6062 Web Site: http://www.mass.gov/dph/oralhealth Available from the website.

Keywords: Assessment, Collaboration, Consumer education materials, Dental care, Health education, Massachusetts, Oral health, Pediatric care, Pregnancy, Pregnant women, Prenatal care, Preventive health services, Referrals, Role, State programs, Young children

Lesley B. 2016. The racial generation gap and the future of our children. Washington, DC: First Focus, 28 pp.

Annotation: This report highlights five demographic trends that illustrate challenges and opportunities for children. Topics include a declining federal investment in children, a growing difference between the share of the population younger than 18 that is a racial or ethnic minority compared to those who are 65 and older, a growing child population in geographic regions with the poorest outcomes in child well-being, growth in minority voters who are highly supportive of children's programs, and changing gender roles and growing support among younger men for children's issues.

Contact: First Focus, 1400 Eye Street, N.W., Suite 650, Washington, DC 20005, Telephone: (202) 657-0670 Fax: (202) 657-0671 Web Site: http://www.firstfocus.net Available from the website.

Keywords: Age factors, Barriers, Child health, Children, Equal opportunities, Federal aid, Geographic factors, Health disparities, Minority groups, Population growth, Racial factors, Role, Trends

Minnesota Department of Health, Child and Teen Checkups Program. 2016. Dental check-ups: Child and Teen Checkups (C&TC) fact sheet for dental providers (rev.). St. Paul, MN: Minnesota Department of Health, Child and Teen Checkups Program, 2 pp.

Annotation: This fact sheet provides information for physicians, nurse practitioners, physician assistants, and nurses about their role in and responsibility for supporting the oral health of infants, children, and adolescents from birth to age 20 who are eligible for Minnesota’s Early and Periodic Screening, Diagnostic, and Treatment program. Topics include requirements for the visit, personnel training, and documentation of counseling and referral; recommendations for oral health risk assessment and fluoride-varnish application; why preventive oral health care is important; anticipatory guidance; professional recommendations; and resources.

Contact: Minnesota Department of Health, Child and Teen Checkups Program, P.O. Box 64882, St. Paul, MN 55164-0882, Telephone: (651) 201-3760 E-mail: health.childandteencheckups@state.mn.us Web Site: http://www.health.state.mn.us/divs/cfh/program/ctc Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescents, Anticipatory guidance, Children, Counseling, Dental caries, EPSDT, Examinations, Fluorides, Infants, Medicaid, Minnesota, Oral health, Preventive health services, Risk assessment, Role, Screening, Service integration, Standards, State programs

CDC Foundation. 2016. Health and well-being for all: Accelerating learning about social determinants [Meeting-in-a-box]. Atlanta, GA: CDC Foundation, multiple items.

Annotation: This tool is designed to help health and health care professionals at all stages of professional development explore the determinants underlying health problems faced by patients and communities. It simulates a 6-step process for leading change to improve the community's health. The tool incorporates a big-picture visual with supporting materials including data cards, group dialogue exercises, and facilitator tips to identify and engage collaborators in addressing asthma, obesity, and gang violence. It also includes tips on using the materials, resources for hosting an event, a fact sheet for sharing information about the tool, and a webinar describing it's use.

Contact: CDC Foundation, 600 Peachtree Street, N.E., Suite 1000, Atanta, GA 30308, Telephone: (404) 653-0790 Secondary Telephone: (888) 880-4CDC Fax: (404) 653-0330 Web Site: http;//www.cdcfoundation.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Asthma, Behavior change, Collaboration, Facilitated communication, Interpersonal violence, Learning, Obesity, Problem solving, Program improvement, Role playing, Social change, Training

Association of Maternal and Child Health Programs. 2016. Family engagement in state Title V maternal and child health (MCH) and children with special health care needs (CYSHCN) programs: Results from a survey–Executive summary. Washington, DC: Association of Maternal and Child Health Programs, 11 pp.

Annotation: This document summarizes findings from a nationwide survey of maternal and child health (MCH) and children and youth with special health care needs (CYSHCN) directors about family engagement policies and practices in Title V-funded programs. The findings provide a snapshot of strategies to support meaningful family engagement, effective and innovative practices, and areas of need for improvement and technical assistance. Topics include creating a culture of family engagement, levels of family engagement, roles of family staff or consultants, family members employed as staff, sustaining and diversifying family engagement, and evaluating family engagement. An overview of the survey development and response, programmatic definitions of family, and a discussion of the results is included. A series of briefs that detail the results in specific areas are also available. [Funded in part by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: Association of Maternal and Child Health Programs, 1825 K Street, N.W., Suite 250, Washington, DC 20006-1202, Telephone: (202) 775-0436 Fax: (202) 478-5120 E-mail: info@amchp.org Web Site: http://www.amchp.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Cultural diversity, Evaluation, Families, Leadership, National surveys, Participation, Public private partnerships, Role, State programs, Sustainability, Title V programs

Association of Maternal and Child Health Programs. 2016. AMCHP case study: Engaging diverse populations–State examples. Washington, DC: Association of Maternal and Child Health Programs, 3 pp.

Annotation: This document describes family engagement as a critical part of Title V maternal and child health (MCH) and children and youth with special health care needs (CYSHCN) programs and ways that states are engaging diverse populations. Contents include case study examples in Kentucky and Texas. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: Association of Maternal and Child Health Programs, 1825 K Street, N.W., Suite 250, Washington, DC 20006-1202, Telephone: (202) 775-0436 Fax: (202) 478-5120 E-mail: info@amchp.org Web Site: http://www.amchp.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Case studies, Community participation, Cultural diversity, Families, Kentucky, Leadership, Public private partnerships, Role, State programs, Texas, Title V programs

Association of Maternal and Child Health Programs. 2016. AMCHP case study: Family engagement–State examples. Washington, DC: Association of Maternal and Child Health Programs, 5 pp.

Annotation: This document describes family engagement as a critical part of Title V maternal and child health (MCH) and children and youth with special health care needs (CYSHCN) programs and highlights ways that states are engaging families. Contents include case study examples in Louisiana, Michigan, and Washington. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: Association of Maternal and Child Health Programs, 1825 K Street, N.W., Suite 250, Washington, DC 20006-1202, Telephone: (202) 775-0436 Fax: (202) 478-5120 E-mail: info@amchp.org Web Site: http://www.amchp.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Case studies, Cultural diversity, Families, Leadership, Louisiana, Michigan, Participation, Public private partnerships, Role, State programs, Title V programs, Washington

Rhode Island Department of Elementary and Secondary Education and Department of Health. 2016. Rhode Island school health manual model guidelines. Providence, RI: Rhode Island Department of Elementary and Secondary Education and Department of Health, 12 pp.

Annotation: This manual for school nurses and other school health personnel provides recommendations, resources, and guidelines for coordinated school health practice and programs throughout Rhode Island. Topics include the role of the school nurse and school administrator; state statutes, regulations, and requirements; health services including dental screenings; and healthful school environment including statewide bullying policy.

Keywords: Guidelines, Models, Program coordination, Rhode Island, Role, School health programs, School health services, School nursing, School safety

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This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number U02MC31613, MCH Advanced Education Policy, $3.5 M. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.