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Strengthening the evidence for maternal and child health programs

Search Results: MCHLine

Items in this list may be obtained from the sources cited. Contact information reflects the most current data about the source that has been provided to the MCH Digital Library.


Displaying records 1 through 20 (78 total).

Jensen F. 2017. The power of the adolescent brain. Rockville, MD: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Office of Adolescent Health, 1 video (30 min.) (Think, Act, Grow (TAG) Talks)

Annotation: This video shares what researchers have learned about adolescent brain development, functioning, and capacity. It explains the strengths and potential of the adolescent brain; addresses learning, risk behavior, addiction, and mental health issues; and provides practical suggestions for families with adolescents. The video is available as a full-length (30 minute) program, as well as in short, individual segments, and is accompanied by citations, additional resources, a guide to technical terms, and discussion guides for professionals and family members.

Contact: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Office of Adolescent Health, 1101 Wootton Parkway, Suite 700, Rockville, MD 20852, Telephone: (240) 453-2846 E-mail: oah.gov@hhs.gov Web Site: http://www.hhs.gov/ash/oah Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescents, Behavior, Child development, Families, Health promotion, Mental health, Protective factors, Resources for professionals, Risk taking

Kann L, Olsen EO, McManus T, Harris WA, Shanklin SL, Flint KH, Queen B, Lowry R, Chyen D, Whittle L, Thornton J, Lim C, Yamakawa Y, Brenner N, Zaza S. 2016. Sexual identify, sex of sexual contacts, and health-related behaviors among students in grades 9–12: United States and selected sites, 2015. MMWR Surveillance Summaries 65(9):1–202,

Annotation: This report summarizes results for 118 health-related behaviors plus obesity, overweight, and asthma by sexual identity and sex of sexual contacts from the 2015 national Youth Risk Behavior Survey, 25 state surveys, and 19 large urban school district surveys conducted among students in grades 9–12. Contents include a description of the Youth Risk Behavior Surveillance System, survey methodology, and survey results for the prevalence of health-risk behaviors among sexual minority students compared with nonsexual minority students. Recommendations for reducing disparities in health-risk behaviors among sexual minority students are also included.

Contact: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 1600 Clifton Road, Atlanta, GA 30329-4027, Telephone: (800) 232-4636 Secondary Telephone: (888) 232-6348 E-mail: cdcinfo@cdc.gov Web Site: http://www.cdc.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent health, Adolescent sexuality, Adolescents, Comparative analysis, Health behavior, Health surveys, Individual characteristics, Minority groups, National surveys, Population surveillance, Prevalence, Risk factors, Risk taking, School districts, School surveys, Sex factors, Sexual behavior, Sexual health, Sexual identity, Sexual partners, State surveys, Statistical data, Urban population

Smith KV, Dye C, Rotz D, Cook E, Rosinsky K, Scott M. 2016. Final impacts of the Gender Matters Program. Washington, DC: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Office of Adolescent Health, 38 pp.

Annotation: This report presents findings from a large-scale demonstration project and evaluation of Gender Matters (Gen.M), a sexuality education curriculum that aims to reduce adolescent pregnancy and associated sexual risk behaviors, in part by challenging commonly held perceptions of gender roles and promoting healthy, equitable relationships. The study reports final impacts of the program on adolescent sexual risk behaviors and other longer-term outcomes measured 18 months after participants enrolled in the study.

Contact: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Office of Adolescent Health, 1101 Wootton Parkway, Suite 700, Rockville, MD 20852, Telephone: (240) 453-2846 E-mail: oah.gov@hhs.gov Web Site: http://www.hhs.gov/ash/oah Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent health, Adolescent pregnancy, Adolescents, Attitudes, Gender discrimination, Model programs, Prevention programs, Program evaluation, Relationships, Risk taking, Sex characteristics, Sexual health

Healthy Youth Development Prevention Research Center. 2016. 2016 Minnesota adolescent sexual health report. Minneapolis, MN: University of Minnesota, Division of General Pediatrics and Adolescent Health, 5 pp.

Annotation: This report provides information about the sexual health of adolescents in Minnesota. Contents include adolescent pregnancy and birth statistics for the period 1990–2014, including information about trends in adolescent pregnancy and birth, national comparison, and subsequent births. Additional topics include geographic and racial/ethnic disparities in adolescent pregnancy, birth, and sexually transmitted infections; sexual orientation; and adverse childhood experiences.

Contact: University of Minnesota, Division of General Pediatrics and Adolescent Health, Department of Pediatrics, 717 Delaware Street, S.E., 3rd Floor, Minneapolis, MN 55414-2959, Telephone: (612) 626-2134 Fax: (612) 6264-0997 Web Site: https://www.pediatrics.umn.edu/divisions/general-pediatrics-and-adolescent-health Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent pregnancy, Adolescents, Childbirth, Ethnic factors, Geographic factors, Health disparities, Minnesota, Risk taking, Sexual health, Sexually transmitted diseases, Statistical data, Trends

MacKay JM, Steel A, Dykstra H, Wheeler T, Samuel E, Green A. 2016. Keeping kids safe in and around water: Exploring misconceptions that lead to drowning . Washington, DC: Safe Kids Worldwide, 27 pp.

Annotation: This report examines current patterns, circumstances, beliefs, and behaviors leading to childhood drowning. Topics include drownings in and around the home, pool drownings, and natural water drownings; preventing drowning in childhood through supervision, swim lessons and water survival skills, and cardiopulmonary resuscitation; pool safety tips for parents; and water recreation public policy. A fact sheet about children and the danger of drowning with information about the problem, parents' misconceptions, water survival skills, and water safety tips is included. Detailed profiles for drownings in and around the home, in pools, and in natural water are availale in the accompanying report, Dangerous Waters: Profiles of Fatal Childhood Drownings in the U.S. 2005–2014.

Contact: Safe Kids Worldwide, 1301 Pennsylvania Avenue, N.W., Suite 1000, Washington, DC 20004-1707, Telephone: (202) 662-0600 Fax: (202) 393-2072 E-mail: info@safekids.org Web Site: http://www.safekids.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Beliefs, Child safety, Children, Competence, Drowning, Injury prevention, Life skills, Parenting, Policy development, Public policy, Risk taking, Statistical data, Water safety

Carney C, McGehe D, Harland K, Weiss M, Raby M. 2015. Using naturalistic driving data to assess the prevalence of environmental factors and driver behaviors in teen driver crashes. Washington, DC: AAA Foundation for Traffic Safety, 69 pp.

Annotation: This report presents findings from a study to examine naturalistic data from crashes that involved adolescent drivers. Topics include characteristics of drivers and passengers, roadway and environment, crashes, vehicle-to-vehicle crashes, and single-vehicle crashes; and driver and passenger behaviors. Contents include a detailed description of the study methodology and the coding sheet with variable definitions.

Contact: AAA Foundation for Traffic Safety, 607 14th Street, N.W., Suite 201, Washington, DC 20005, Telephone: (202) 638-5944 Fax: (202) 638-5943 E-mail: info@aaafoundation.org Web Site: http://www.aaafoundation.org/home/ Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescents, Behavior, Data analysis, Environment, External cause of injury codes, Motor vehicle crashes, Research methodology, Risk factors, Risk taking, Safety, Transportation injuries, Unintentional injuries

Texas Department of State Health Services, Oral Health Program. 2015. Texas oral health and Youth Risk Behavior Surveillance System. Austin, TX: Texas Department of State Health Services, Oral Health Program, 2 pp.

Annotation: This document presents findings on the relationship between preventive oral health care use and health behaviors among students in grades 9-12 in Texas. Contents include the percentage of students lacking dental visits within the past year by age; race/ethnicity; risk-taking behavior (drinking soda, tobacco use, marijuana use); and healthy behavior (physical activity and good school grades).

Contact: Texas Department of State Health Services, Oral Health Improvement Program, P.O. Box 149347, Mail Code 1818, Austin, TX 78714-9347, Telephone: (512) 776-2008 Fax: (512) 776-7256 E-mail: dental@dshs.state.tx.us Web Site: http://www.dshs.state.tx.us/dental/default.shtm Available from the website.

Keywords: Academic achievement, Access to health care, Adolescents, Age factors, Children, Comparative analysis, Dental care, Ethnic factors, Health behavior, Health care disparities, Health care utilization, National surveys, Nutrition, Oral health, Preventive health services, Risk taking, State surveys, Statistical data, Texas, Tobacco, Young adults

Kann L, Kinchen S, Shanklin SL, Flint KH, Hawkins J, Harris WA, Lowry R, O'Malley Olsen E, McManus T, Chyen D, Whittle L, Taylor E, Demissie Z, Brener N, Thornton J, Moore J, Zaza S. 2014. Youth risk behavior surveillance: United States, 2013. MMWR Surveillance Summaries 63(4):1-168,

Annotation: This report summarizes results for 104 health-risk behaviors plus obesity, overweight, and asthma from the 2013 national survey, 42 state surveys, and 21 large urban school district surveys conducted among students in grades 9-12. Topics include behaviors that contribute to unintentional injuries and violence, tobacco use, alcohol and other drug use, sexual behaviors that contribute to unintended pregnancy and sexually transmitted infections including human immunodeficiency virus infection, unhealthy dietary behaviors, and physical inactivity.

Contact: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 1600 Clifton Road, Atlanta, GA 30329-4027, Telephone: (800) 232-4636 Secondary Telephone: (888) 232-6348 E-mail: cdcinfo@cdc.gov Web Site: http://www.cdc.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescents, Health behavior, Population surveillance, Risk taking, Surveys

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. 2014. Strategies for reducing health disparities: Selected CDC-sponsored interventions, United States, 2014. Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report 63(1, Suppl.):1-48,

Annotation: This supplement highlights selected interventions sponsored by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention that have been proven effective or show promise in reducing health disparities. Topics include HIV infection, vaccination, motor vehicle injuries, and tobacco use.

Contact: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 1600 Clifton Road, Atlanta, GA 30329-4027, Telephone: (800) 232-4636 Secondary Telephone: (888) 232-6348 E-mail: cdcinfo@cdc.gov Web Site: http://www.cdc.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Access to health care, Barriers, Federal programs, Health behaviors, Intervention, Model programs, Prevention services, Risk factors, Risk taking

Safe Kids Worldwide. 2014. Changing the culture of youth sports. Washington, DC: Safe Kids Worldwide, 23 pp.

Annotation: This report presents findings from a survey of athletes in grades 7-10, coaches of athletes in grades 7-10, and parents with children who play sports in grades 1-10 about sports injuries and what is being done to keep young athletes safe while playing sports. The report provides information on sports injuries in children, players who play injured, injuries resulting from foul play, and opportunities to improve coaches' knowledge and skills. Tips on sports safety are also included.

Contact: Safe Kids Worldwide, 1301 Pennsylvania Avenue, N.W., Suite 1000, Washington, DC 20004-1707, Telephone: (202) 662-0600 Fax: (202) 393-2072 E-mail: info@safekids.org Web Site: http://www.safekids.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Athletes, Child safety, Children, Injury prevention, International health, International programs, Program improvement, Recreational safety, Risk taking, Safety programs, Sports equipment, Sports injuries, Team sports

Fischer P. 2014. Distracted and dangerous: Helping states keep teens focused on the road. Washington, DC: Governors Highway Safety Association, 55 pp.

Annotation: This document provides a snapshot of current research and data on distracted driving among adolescents, and discusses how states are using this and other information to reduce its incidence. The report focuses on legislative, enforcement, and educational initiatives at the state and local level, and discusses national policies and programs specifically targeting novice driver distraction.

Contact: Governors Highway Safety Association, 444 North Capitol Street, N.W., Suite 722, Washington, DC 20001, Telephone: (202) 789-0942 Fax: (202) 789-0946 E-mail: headquarters@ghsa.org Web Site: http://www.ghsa.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescents, Community action, Motor vehicles, National initiatives, Public policy, Research, Risk taking, State programs

Institute of Medicine and National Research Council. 2014. Confronting commercial sexual exploitation and sex trafficking of minors in the United States: A guide for the health care sector. Washington, DC: Institute of Medicine , 37 pp.

Annotation: This guide for health professionals presents findings from a comprehensive review of commercial sexual exploitation and sex trafficking of minors in the United States. Topics include the definition of the issue, guiding principles, the extent of the problem, risk factors, and consequences. Additional topics include barriers to identification of victims and survivors, how health professionals can help, and recommended strategies.

Contact: National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine, Health and Medicine Division, 500 Fifth Street, N.W., Washington, DC 20001, Telephone: (202) 334-2352 Fax: (202) 334-1412 E-mail: HMD-NASEM@nas.edu Web Site: https://www.nationalacademies.org/hmd Available from the website.

Keywords: Barriers, Children, Resources for professionals, Risk taking, Sexual behavior

Sacks VH, Moore KA, Ramirez AN, Terzian M. 2014. An analysis of state underage drinking policies and adolescent alcohol use. Bethesda, MD: Child Trends, 9 pp.

Annotation: This brief examines the relationship between 14 state underage drinking laws and drinking prevalence among U. S. high school students, using data from the Youth Risk Behavior Surveillance Survey, the Alcohol Policy Information System, and the Child Trends' state policy database. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: Child Trends, 7315 Wisconsin Avenue, Suite 1200 W, Bethesda, MD 20814, Telephone: (240) 223-9200 E-mail: Web Site: http://www.childtrends.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescents, Alcohol consumption behavior, Policy analysis, Prevalence, Risk taking, State legislation

Wisconsin Department of Health Services, Injury Research Center at the Medical College of Wisconsin, Mental Health America of Wisconsin. 2014. Burden of suicide in Wisconsin 2007-2011. Madison, WI: Wisconsin Department of Health Services, 59 pp.

Annotation: This report provides an overview of the burden of suicide in Wisconsin. Topics include the extent and costs of suicidal behavior, the incidence and geographical distribution of suicide, and the implications of the data and their application to strategies for suicide prevention. Additional contents include a glossary, technical notes, and tables that provide supplemental information to the tables, figures, and data presented in the body of the report. [Funded in part by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: Wisconsin Department of Health Services, One West Wilson Street, Madison, WI 53703, Telephone: (608) 266-1865 Secondary Telephone: (888) 701-1251 Web Site: https://www.dhs.wisconsin.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescents, Adults, Attempted suicide, Costs, Incidence, Population surveillance, Risk factors, Risk taking, Statistical data, Suicide, Suicide prevention, Wisconsin

Grinnell Mutual Wellness Program, University of Iowa Injury Prevention Research Center, University of Iowa College of Public Health, Blank Children's Hospital, ACT Program. 2014. Steering teens safe: A parent guide for safe teen driving. Iowa City, IA: University of Iowa College of Public Health, 1 v.

Annotation: This guide is designed to help parents teach adolescents about safe driving. Contents include 22 lessons with examples of talking points and conversation starters to guide effective discussions with adolescents. Topics include basic safety principles, skills for safe driving, special skills for rural roads, special driving situations, and setting guidelines for a child to drive. Information about text messaging and graduated licensing laws are also included.

Contact: University of Iowa College of Public Health, S160 CPHB, 145 N. Riverside Drive, Iowa City, IA 52242, Telephone: (319) 384-1500 Web Site: https://www.public-health.uiowa.edu Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescents, Injury prevention, Iowa, Motor vehicle crashes, Parent education, Risk taking, Rural environment, State programs

Murphey D, Barry M, Vaughn B. 2013. Positive mental health: Resilience. Washington, DC: Child Trends, 6 pp. (Adolescent health highlight)

Annotation: This report presents research findings on characteristics that are associated with adolescent resilience, describes program strategies that promote resilience, and discusses links between resilience and avoidance of risk-taking behaviors. Topics include relationships and social skills, hormonal and physical changes, self confidence, spirituality, emotional self-regulation, and overall well-being. Resources and references for additional information on resilience in adolescence is provided.

Contact: Child Trends, 7315 Wisconsin Avenue, Suite 1200 W, Bethesda, MD 20814, Telephone: (240) 223-9200 E-mail: Web Site: http://www.childtrends.org Available from the website. Document Number: Pub. no. 2013-03.

Keywords: Adolescence, Adolescent behavior, Adolescent development, Coping, Psychological development, Psychosocial development, Resilience, Risk taking, Youth

Colman S, Dee TS, Joyce TJ. 2013. Do parental involvement laws deter risky teen sex?. Cambridge, MA: National Bureau of Economic Research, 43 pp. (NBER working paper series no. 18810)

Annotation: This paper addresses the question of whether laws requiring that physicians notify or obtain consent from a parent of a minor seeking an abortion before performing the procedure deter risky adolescent sexual behavior. Drawing on multiple data sources, the paper seeks to reconcile the disparate findings in the existing literature and to provide new and comprehensive evidence on the association between parental involvement (PI) laws and rates of sexually transmitted infections (STIs) in adolescents. Topics include abortion access and risky sexual activity among adolescents, data and samples, methods, and estimated impacts of PI laws on STIs.

Contact: National Bureau of Economic Research, 1050 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, MA 02138-5398, Telephone: (617) 868-3900 Fax: (617) 868-2742 E-mail: info@nber.org Web Site: http://www.nber.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Abortion, Access to health care, Adolescent behavior, Adolescent sexuality, Consent, Health services, Parents, Legislation, Prevention, Risk taking, Sexually transmitted diseases, Statistical data

Consumer Reports Health. 2013. What to reject when you're expecting: 10 procedures to think twice about during your pregnancy. Yonkers, NY: Consumer Reports, 12 pp.

Annotation: This report describes medical procedures that when conducted during normal pregnancy, labor, or childbirth have been associated with poorer outcomes for women, infants, or both. It also provides tips on what women can do before becoming pregnant to reduce the risk of adverse outcomes for themselves and their infants. A list of organizations that may serve as resources and sources for hospital data by state are included. It is part of a health communication program created by Consumer Reports for members of the National Business Group on Health based on information from the Consumer Reports website.

Contact: National Business Group on Health, 20 F Street, N.W., Suite 200, Washington, DC 20001-6700, Telephone: (202) 558-3000 Fax: (202) 628-9244 E-mail: info@businessgrouphealth.org Web Site: http://www.businessgrouphealth.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adverse effects, Childbirth, Consumer education, Consumer protection, Pregnancy, Risk taking

Child Trends Data Bank. 2013. Steroid use: Indicators on children and youth (upd.). [Bethesda, MD]: Child Trends Data Bank, 12 pp.

Annotation: This report provides information about anabolic steroid use among students in grades 8, 10, and 12. The report discusses the importance of the issue (including health problems and behavior problems related to steroid use in adolescents); trends; differences by gender, race, and HIspanic origin, and college plans; state and local estimates; international estimates; and national goals.

Contact: Child Trends, 7315 Wisconsin Avenue, Suite 1200 W, Bethesda, MD 20814, Telephone: (240) 223-9200 E-mail: Web Site: http://www.childtrends.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent attitudes, Adolescent behavior, Adolescent health, Athletes, Eduational factors, Ethnic factors, Mental health problems, Racial factors, Risk taking, Sex factors, Statistical data, Steroids, Substance abuse, Trends

Foundation for Advancing Alcohol Responsibility. 2012-. IKnowEverything. Arlington, VA: Foundation for Advancing Alcohol Responsibility, multiple items.

Annotation: This document provides guidance to facilitators of IKnowEverything, an adolescent driver safety program that reinforces how to be a safe driver, how to avoid being a distracted driver, and the role that parents play in shaping and influencing adolescent driving behaviors. Contents include a program overview, suggested messaging, facts, online resources, and tips for adolescent drivers and their parents. A video is also available.

Contact: Foundation for Advancing Alcohol Responsibility, 2345 Crystal Drive, Suite 710, Arlington, VA Telephone: (202) 637-0077 Web Site: http://responsibility.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent behavior, Alcohol consumption behavior, Alcohol related injuries, Impaired driving, Injury prevention, Motor vehicle safety, Multimedia, Parent education, Risk taking, Safety programs

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This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number U02MC31613, MCH Advanced Education Policy, $3.5 M. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.