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Strengthening the evidence for maternal and child health programs

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Items in this list may be obtained from the sources cited. Contact information reflects the most current data about the source that has been provided to the MCH Digital Library.


Displaying records 1 through 20 (31 total).

Chazin S, Glover J. 2017. A community framework for addressing social determinants of oral health for low-income populations. Hamilton, NJ: Center for Health Care Strategies, 11 pp. (Technical assistance brief)

Annotation: This brief describes a framework for assessing social determinants related to oral health and creating partnerships to improve oral health among children from families with low incomes. Topics include identifying the social determinants of oral health in a community, mapping and mobilizing community resources through partnership, selecting approaches to take action, and evaluating implementation and impact. Contents include example indicators potentially related to oral health, intervention metrics, and how the framework was applied to select an intervention.

Contact: Center for Health Care Strategies, 200 American Metro Boulevard, Suite 119, Hamilton, NJ 08619, Telephone: (609) 528-8400 Fax: (609) 586-3679 E-mail: Web Site: http://www.chcs.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Case studies, Collaboration, Community coordination, Community participation, Low income groups, Models, Needs assessment, Oral health, Outcome evaluation, Process evaluation, Program planning, Public private partnerships, Relationships, Resource allocation

Aspen Education & Society Program and Council of Chief State School Officers. 2017. Leading for equity: Opportunities for state education chiefs. Washington, DC: Council of Chief State School Officers, 32 pp.

Annotation: This guide defines educational equity and describes actions state education chiefs can take to create a more equitable education system in their state. Topics include setting and communicating an equity vision and measurable targets; focusing on the state education agency; creating accountability for equity; engaging local education agencies and providing tailored differentiated support; allocating resources to achieve fiscal equity; investing in the youngest learners; monitoring equitable implementation of standards and assessments; focusing on teachers and leaders; focusing on conditions of learning (school culture, climate, and social-emotional development); and ensuring families have access to high-quality educational options that align to community needs.

Contact: Council of Chief State School Officers, One Massachusetts Avenue, N.W., Suite 700, Washington, DC 20001-1431, Telephone: (202) 336-7000 Fax: (202) 408-8072 E-mail: info@ccsso.org Web Site: http://www.ccsso.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Accountability, Assessments, Communication, Educational change, Equal opportunities, Family centered services, Leadership, Learning, Measures, Policy development, Program development, Public education, Resource allocation, Schools, Standards, State education agencies, Students, Teachers, Teaching

National Governors Association. 2016. Improving state efforts to prepare and respond to public health emergencies. Washington, DC: National Governors Association, 9 pp.

Annotation: This paper provides state governors with actions they can take to improve preparedness for public health emergencies. Topics include understanding legal authority to respond in the event of a public health disaster, establishing and institutionalizing coordination among key players, strengthening internal and external communications, and identifying gaps in baseline capabilities and available resources needed to address these gaps.

Contact: National Governors Association, 444 North Capitol Street, Suite 267, Washington, DC 20001-1512, Telephone: (202) 624-5300 Secondary Telephone: Fax: (202) 624-5313 E-mail: webmaster@nga.org Web Site: http://www.nga.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Communication, Crisis intervention, Disaster planning, Legal issues, Program coordination, Public health infrastructure, Resource allocation, Service delivery systems, State government

Center for Mental Health in Schools. 2016. Improving ESSA planning for student and learning supports. Los Angeles, CA: Center for Mental Health in Schools, 7 pp. (Research for school improvement and transformation: Policy notes)

Annotation: This document describes a framework for developing a comprehensive and equitable system to address barriers to student learning and teaching. The framework comprises student and learning supports within the context of a continuum of interconnected subsystems that promote healthy development and prevent problems, intervene early, and treat severe and chronic problems. Contents include how organizational and operational infrastructures can be reworked to enable the development, implementation, and sustainability of the approach.

Contact: Center for Mental Health in Schools, UCLA School Mental Health Project, Box 951563, Los Angeles, CA 90095-1563, Telephone: (310) 825-3634 Secondary Telephone: (866) 846-4843 Fax: (310) 206-8716 E-mail: smhp@ucla.edu Web Site: http://smhp.psych.ucla.edu Available from the website.

Keywords: Accountability, Barriers, Child development, Collaboration, Early intervention, Equal opportunities, Health promotion, Interdisciplinary approach, Learning, Organizational change, Policy development, Program improvement, Program planning, Resource allocation, School districts, Service integration, Standards, Students, Systems development, Teaching

Cook-Harvey CM, Darling-Hammond L, Lam L, Mercer C, Roc M. 2016. Equity and ESSA: Leveraging educational opportunity through the Every Student Succeeds Act. Palo Alto, CA: Learning Policy Institute, 26 pp.

Annotation: This report for educators, researchers, policy influencers, and advocates examines provisions in the Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA) that can be used to advance equity and excellence in education for all students. The report reviews the provisions in the following four areas: higher-order skills for all students, multiple measures to assess school performance and progress, resource equity, and equity strategies and evidence-based interventions. Topics include standards and learning goals, assessments, opportunities to learn, school climate and student inclusion, equitable access to effective teaching, reporting school expenditures and tracking inequities, state plans' focus on equity, incentives for equitable funding approaches, how equity policy can leverage successes for new immigrant students, school improvement funding, early childhood education, community schools, and integration and school diversity.

Contact: Learning Policy Institute, 1530 Page Mill Road, Suite 200, Palo Alto, CA 94303, Telephone: (650) 332-9797 Web Site: https://learningpolicyinstitute.org/ Available from the website.

Keywords: Academic achievement, Barriers, Educational change, Equal opportunities, Intervention, Legislation, Low income groups, Measures, Public education, Resource allocation, Students, Systems development, Thinking, Underserved communities, Vulnerability

Association of State and Territorial Health Officials. 2014. SNAP and WIC side-by-side comparison. Arlington, VA: Association of State and Territorial Health Officials, 9 pp.

Annotation: This chart compares the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) and the Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants, and Children (WIC) across populations served, methods of resource allocation, and other dimensions. The last page of the document includes a chart of SNAP and WIC program locations within governmental agencies by state or territory including nine jurisdictions where WIC and SNAP are co-located and within the state/territory health agency under the same department.

Contact: Association of State and Territorial Health Officials, 2231 Crystal Drive, Suite 450, Arlington, VA 22202, Telephone: (202) 371-9090 Fax: (571) 527-3189 Web Site: http://www.astho.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Comparative analysis, Nutrition programs, Resource allocation, State health agencies, State programs, WIC program

Vericker T, Isaacs J, Hahn H, Toran K, Rennane S. 2012. How targeted are federal expenditures on children?: A Kid's Share analysis of expenditures by income in 2009. Washington, DC: Urban Institute and Brookings, 20 pp.

Annotation: This report provides an analysis of how the allocation of public resources for children varies by family income. Examining federal expenditures for nearly 100 federal programs in 2009, the report focuses on the distribution of spending among low-income children; the percentage of low-income children served within programs; the ten largest federal programs and tax provisions benefitting low-income children; the amount of federal dollars spent on low income children; and the state and local government contributions on spending to low income children. Key findings are presented in figures and tables.

Contact: Urban Institute, 2100 M Street, N.W., Washington, DC 20037, Telephone: (202) 833-7200 Fax: (202) 467-5775 E-mail: http://www.urban.org/about/contact.cfm Web Site: http://www.urban.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Children, Data analysis, Economic factors, Federal programs, Low income groups, Reports, Resource allocation

National Governors Association. 2012. Governor's role in aligning early education and K–12 reforms: Challenges, opportunities, and benefits for children. Washington, DC: National Governors Association, 12 pp.

Annotation: This paper describes opportunities for state governors to bring state agencies together and develop a coordinated strategy to align early childhood education (ECE) and K–12 policies so they better serve all children, starting at birth. Contents include an analysis of what ECE and K–12 goals, approaches, and reform strategies have in common and how they differ and action steps that promote greater alignment of ECE and K–12 reforms in key areas. Topics include leadership and governance, learning standards, child assessments, accountability, teacher/leader preparation and professional development, and resource allocation and reallocation.

Contact: National Governors Association, 444 North Capitol Street, Suite 267, Washington, DC 20001-1512, Telephone: (202) 624-5300 Secondary Telephone: Fax: (202) 624-5313 E-mail: webmaster@nga.org Web Site: http://www.nga.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Accountability, Assessments, Early childhood education, Educational reform, Leadership, Learning, Policy development, Program coordination, Resource allocation, Standards, State government, Training

Suitor CW. 2010. Planning a WIC research agenda: Workshop summary. Washington, DC: National Academies Press, 166 pp.

Annotation: This document summarizes information gathered during a public workshop hosted by the Institute of Medicine in July 2010 to discuss the best use of federal funds allocated for research on the short and long term impacts of WIC -- the Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants, and Children, which provides services to low-income, nutritionally at-risk individuals. The document summarizes workshop sessions on research topics including birth outcomes, obesity, breastfeeding protection, food insecurity and hunger, dietary intake and nutritional status, nutritional education, families, and the health care system in general. Proposals for future research include concerns related to methodology as well as data considerations. The full workshop agenda is included as an appendix.

Contact: National Academies Press, 500 Fifth Street, N.W., Keck 360, Washington, DC 20001, Telephone: (202) 334-3313 Secondary Telephone: (888) 624-8373 Fax: (202) 334-2451 E-mail: customer_service@nap.edu Web Site: http://www.nap.edu Available from the website after registration.

Keywords: Child health, Infant health, Meetings, Nutrition, Reports, Research, Research methodology, Research proposals, Resource allocation, WIC Program, Women's health

2010. [Discussion paper series on social determinants of health]. Geneva, Switzerland: World Health Organization,

Annotation: This series of papers provides a forum for sharing knowledge on how to tackle the social determinants of health to improve health equity. The papers explore themes related to questions of strategy, governance, tools, and capacity building. They aim to review country experiences with an eye to understanding practice, innovations, and encouraging frank debate on the connections between health and the broader policy environment.

Contact: WHO Press, World Health Organization, 20 Avenue Appia, 1211 Geneva 27, Switzerland, Telephone: +41 22 791 3264 Fax: +41 22 791 4857 E-mail: bookorders@who.int Web Site: http://apps.who.int/bookorders/ Available from the website.

Keywords: Access to health care, Health status disparities, International health, Patient advocacy, Resource allocation, Socioeconomic factors

Singh S, Darroch JE, Ashford JE, Vlassoff M. 2009. Adding it up: The costs and benefits of investing in family planning and maternal and newborn health. New York, NY: Alan Guttmacher Institute, 40 pp.

Annotation: This report is intended to guide decision-makers and resource allocators at all levels -- local and national government, bilateral and multilateral donors, and nongovernmental organizations -- in making investments that would reap the greatest returns for individuals and societies. It presents analyses on the costs and benefits of investing in two key components of sexual and reproductive health care: family planning and maternal and newborn health services.

Contact: Guttmacher Institute, 125 Maiden Lane, New York, NY 10038, Telephone: (212) 248-1111 Secondary Telephone: (800) 355-0244 Fax: (212) 248-1951; Washington, D.C. Office (202) 223-5756 E-mail: guttmacher@guttmacher.org Web Site: http://www.guttmacher.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Benefits, Contraception use, Costs, Diagnosis, Health services, International health, Maternal health, Prevention, Public policy, Reproductive health, Resource allocation, Sexual health, Sexually transmitted diseases

Vermont Department of Mental Health, Child, Adolescent and Family Unit. 2009. The statewide system of care plan for child, adolescent and family mental health in Vermont: Plan for fiscal years 2000-2011. Waterbury, VT: Vermont Department of Mental Health, 79 pp.

Annotation: This report focuses on the vision, current reality, and 3-year priorities for the development of Vermont's public mental health system. The report discusses (1) what the Child, Adolescent, and Family Unit of the Division of Mental Health is trying to accomplish in collaboration with Designated and Specialized Service agencies; (2) how the system serves Vermonters; (3) how funds are used, (4) the level of resources needed to support and expand services, and (5) the priorities for FY 2009 to FY 2011. Appendices include composite stories about children's mental health, recommendations, and other information.

Contact: Vermont Department of Mental Health, 108 Cherry Street-PO Box 70, Burlington, VT 05402, Telephone: (802) 652-2000 Secondary Telephone: (800) 464-4343 Fax: 802- 652-2005 Web Site: http://mentalhealth.vermont.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent health, Child health, Collaboration, Community programs, Costs, Families, Financing, Health care systems, Health services, Mental health, Public health, Resource allocation, State programs, Vermont

Zero to Three. 2009. Infants and toddlers in the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act: Planning tools and resources for the states. Washington, DC: Zero to Three, 2 pp.

Annotation: This document lists planning tools and resources to aid states in their efforts to address the challenges faced with accepting and administering new funds from the federal American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA). Tools and resources include state, regional and national data profiles; a strategic planning toolkit; a framework for early childhood plans; a self-assessment checklist for states; information about the ARRA; a policy guide; and a searchable database on state policies and initiatives. The document provides descriptions of each resource and a link to the Web site where the resource is located.

Contact: ZERO TO THREE: National Center for Infants, Toddlers and Families, 1255 23rd Street, N.W., Suite 350, Washington, DC 20037, Telephone: (202) 638-1144 Fax: (202) 638-0851 Web Site: http://www.zerotothree.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Federal aid, Federal legislation, Infants, Resource allocation, State programs, Very young children

Committee on the Ryan White CARE Act: Data for Resource Allocation, Planning, and Evaluation. 2004. Measuring what matters: Allocation, planning, and quality assessment for the Ryan White CARE Act. Washington, DC: National Academies Press, 302 pp.

Annotation: This report describes a study conducted by the Institute of Medicine about issues related to the allocation of Ryan White Care Amendment (RWCA) funds. Specifically, the purposes of the study were (1) to assess whether reported HIV cases are adequate, reliable, and sufficiently accurate for inclusion in formula grants under Title I and II of RWCA and to make recommendations for the improvement of HIV reporting systems, (2) to identify data and tools for assessing a community's severity of need and how that information can be used in allocation decisions, and (3) to identify available health outcome and other data that can be used to measure the quality of and access to RWCA-funded services. The report (1) provides an overview of the HIV/AIDS epidemic, financing of HIV/AIDS care, the legislative history of RWCA, and its current structure; (2) provides background on public health and HIV/AIDS surveillance and provides context for how surveillance data are used in the allocation formulas; (3) evaluates the potential for data on HIV cases to be incorporated into the Title I and II allocation formulas; (4) examines data and methods for estimating the severity of need and related resource needs, (5) reviews measures that can be used to assess the quality of HIV/AIDS care provided by the RWCA, and (6) summarizes the committee's findings and recommendations. Six appendices include financial resources of states for HIV/AIDS reporting, analyses of the sensitivity of the formula allocations to underlying changes to input data, and other information. Statistical information and other information is presented in tables and figures throughout the report. Each chapter includes references.

Contact: National Academies Press, 500 Fifth Street, N.W., Keck 360, Washington, DC 20001, Telephone: (202) 334-3313 Secondary Telephone: (888) 624-8373 Fax: (202) 334-2451 E-mail: customer_service@nap.edu Web Site: http://www.nap.edu Available from the website. Document Number: ISBN 0-309-09115-2.

Keywords: AIDS, Communities, Costs, Data, Government financing, Government programs, HIV, Health services, Population surveillance, Public health, Resource allocation

Family Health Outcomes Project. 2003. Developing an effective MCH planning process: A guide for local MCH programs. (2nd ed.). San Francisco, CA: Family Health Outcomes Project, 223 pp.

Annotation: The purpose of this manual is to assist local public health agencies in conducting a needs-based, rational planning and resource allocation process. It describes processes generic to all planning efforts at the local level and provides case examples specific to maternal and child health programs that are required to conduct a formal needs assessment and planning process every 3-5 years to receive their annual block grant funds. The manual includes the following chapters: (1) building a constituency for community assessment and date-based planning, (2) community health assessment, (3) conducting a formal problem analysis and identifying effective interventions, (4) developing objectives, performance measures, and an action plan, (5) program evaluation and performance monitoring, (6) putting it all together: creating a planning document, and (7) available tools for public health core data functions. Extensive appendices include public health indicators and their use, California county data resources on the Web, and much more.

Contact: Family Health Outcomes Project, University of California San Francisco School of Medicine, Department of Family and Community Medicine, 500 Parnassus Ave. Room MU-337, San Francisco, CA 94143, Telephone: (415) 476-5283 Contact Phone: (415) 476-5283 Fax: (415) 476-6051 E-mail: fhop@fcm.ucsf.edu Contact E-mail: fhop@itsa.ucsf.edu Web Site: http://fhop.ucsf.edu/fhop $30.00, includes shipping and handling.

Keywords: Block grants, Community health services, Community programs, Evaluation, Intervention, Local MCH programs, Local government, Needs assessment, Planning, Public health agencies, Resource allocation

Athey J, Kavanagh L, Bagley K. 2001. The MCH training program: An evaluation. Arlington, VA: National Center for Education in Maternal and Child Health, 120 pp., exec. summ. (19 pp.).

Annotation: This report describes the evaluation of the Maternal and Child Health (MCH) Training Program, conducted in two phases. Phase one focused on describing the program's history and development and identifying themes common to the 13 priorities. Phase two, the subject of this report, broadly assesses the program's accomplishments, identifies problems, and provides recommendations focused on program operations and management. The first section of the report briefly defines the 13 long-term interdisciplinary priorities. Chapter topics include the methodology, statistical snapshots, leadership training, supporting faculty, contributing to advances in the field, promoting collaboration, the economics of MCH training, and recommendations. Appendices provide listings of the evaluation project advisors, site-visited projects and their directors, and additional information on interviews with former trainees. The report also includes extensive tables, figures, notes, and a bibliography. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: Maternal and Child Health Library at Georgetown University, Telephone: (202) 784-9770 E-mail: mchgroup@georgetown.edu Web Site: https://www.mchlibrary.org Document Number: ISBN 1-57285-069-8.

Keywords: Cost effectiveness, Economic factors, Interdisciplinary approach, Leadership training, MCH training programs, Needs assessment, Professional training, Program evaluation, Resource allocation, SPRANS, Statistical analysis, Universities

National Alliance for Hispanic Health. 2001. Hispanic health needs assessment: A community guide for documenting health status and establishing priorities. (3rd. ed.). Washington, DC: National Alliance for Hispanic Health, 207 pp.

Annotation: This needs assessment is designed to help readers identify the health issues of greatest concern to Hispanics in their communities and to provide a framework to use for assessing the data that describe the populations in their areas. The needs assessment also provides questions to ask for determining what resources exist. The findings presented in the needs assessment are intended to help communities establish goals for disease prevention and health promotion. Most of the information in the needs assessment is presented in tables. The needs assessment is divided into three main sections: (1) demographic overview of the community, (2) mortality overview of the community, and (3) Healthy People 2010 objectives for improving health. Eight appendices include sample forms and letters (some in Spanish); information about health departments, data centers, offices, and clearinghouses; a glossary (in English and Spanish); and flash cards for a community leadership health care priorities survey.

Contact: National Alliance for Hispanic Health, 1501 16th Street, N.W., Washington, DC 20036-1401, Telephone: (202) 387-5000 Secondary Telephone: (866) 783-2645 Fax: E-mail: Web Site: http://www.hispanichealth.org First edition available in libraries.

Keywords: Communities, Demography, Disease prevention, Health, Health promotion, Healthy People 2010, Hispanic Americans, Mortality, Needs assessment, Resource allocation, Spanish language materials

U.S. Maternal and Child Health Bureau. 2000. Title V: A snapshot of maternal and child health 2000. Rockville, MD: U.S. Maternal and Child Health Bureau, 296 pp.

Annotation: This report describes the Title V Maternal and Child Health Block Grant to States program and provides a national statistical overview of Title V programs. The report includes a listing of the Special Projects of Regional and National Significance (SPRANS) and other federal MCH grants to each state and jurisdiction. The data presented are for FY 98. The bulk of the report consists of a statistical summary for individual states. Each summary includes data about (1) the number of pregnant women, infants, children, and children with special health care needs (CSHCN) who were served by Title V; (2) a full picture of the sources of funding for maternal and child health (MCH); (3) the relative allocation of resources among four levels of service on the MCH pyramid of services; and (4) a selection of performance and outcome measures. The report also describes the electronic reporting package (ERP) used for data collection, and includes the Maternal and Child Health Bureau strategic plan, a list of resource organizations, and a glossary. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Keywords: Block grants, Child health, Children with special health care needs, Financing, Fiscal management, MCH programs, Maternal health, Outcome and process assessment, Outcome evaluation, Resource allocation, SPRANS, State programs, Statistics, Title V programs

Ireys HT, Wehr E, Cooke RE. 1999. Defining medical necessity: Strategies for promoting access to quality care for persons with developmental disabilities, mental retardation, and other special health care needs. Arlington, VA: National Center for Education in Maternal and Child Health, 34 pp., exec. summ. (4 pp.).

Annotation: This report outlines a strategy for defining medical necessity that will promote high quality care for children, youth, and adults with developmental disabilities, mental retardation, serious emotional disorders, or other special health care needs. The report begins with background information including defining the population involved and its service needs. It explains why medical necessity determinations are important and gives key criteria including a recommended approach to defining medical necessity. Appendices include a list of contributors, medical necessity definitions by states and organizations, and an analysis of selected definitions of medical necessity. The executive summary presents a one page synopsis of specifications for defining medical necessity and includes one paragraph each on the problem, the goal, the report, and the audience. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Keywords: Access to health care, Affective disorders, Developmental disabilities, Mental retardation, Qualitative evaluation, Reports, Resource allocation, Special health care services

U.S. Maternal and Child Health Bureau, Title V Maternal and Child Health Block Grant to State Programs. 1999. Title V: A snapshot of maternal and child health 1997. Rockville, MD: U.S. Maternal and Child Health Bureau, 164 pp.

Annotation: This report describes the Title V Maternal and Child Health Block Grant to State program and provides a national statistical overview of Title V programs. The bulk of the report consists of a statistical summary for individual states. Each summary includes data about (1) the number of pregnant women, infants, children, and children with special health care needs (CSHCN) who were served by Title V; (2) a full picture of the sources of funding for maternal and child health (MCH); (3) the relative allocation of resources among four levels of service on the MCH pyramid of services; and (4) a selection of performance and outcome measures. The report also describes the electronic reporting package (ERP) used for data collection, and includes a list of resource organizations and a glossary. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Keywords: Block grants, Child health, Children with special health care needs, Financing, Fiscal management, MCH programs, Maternal health, Outcome and process assessment, Outcome evaluation, Resource allocation, State programs, Statistics, Title V programs

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This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number U02MC31613, MCH Advanced Education Policy, $3.5 M. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.