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Strengthen the Evidence for Maternal and Child Health Programs

Search Results: MCHLine

Items in this list may be obtained from the sources cited. Contact information reflects the most current data about the source that has been provided to the MCH Digital Library.


Displaying records 1 through 8 (8 total).

n.d.. Posters. No place: No publisher, 9 posters.

Annotation: Each poster in this collection was prepared by an insurance company or a state agency. They direct attention to various issues in child safety. A poster by American Re-Insurance Company shows a child with his head bandaged, and cites the statistic on injuries when bike helmets are not worn. A second poster by American Re-Insurance Company repeats the statistic, but illustrates it with an overturned bike. The New York State Health Department poster shows a cross section of a house in which a hazardous activity is pictured in each room. The viewer is told that these hazards number forty, and is asked to identify them. The reverse side of the poster shows the answers. The remaining posters are by Massachusetts health and safety agencies. One shows a baby in a car seat and points out safety features of the seat. Another shows two gallon jugs: one of milk and one of bleach. The viewer is made to realize that a two year old would not know the difference. Three posters reinforce the "buckle up" message, and there is one on playground safety. Both English and Spanish are used in the posters.

Contact: Massachusetts Department of Public Health, Injury Prevention and Control Program, 250 Washington Street, Fourth Floor, Boston, MA 02108, Telephone: (617) 624-5557 Contact Phone: (617) 727-1246 Price unknown.

Keywords: Bicycles, Car seats, Helmets, Poisoning, Posters, Residential injuries, Seat belts, Spanish language materials

National Fire Protection Association. 2012-2015. Learn not to burn. Quincy, MA: National Fire Protection Association, 5 v.

Annotation: These resource books are designed to teach young children how to prevent fire-related injuries; they can be used alone or used to supplement the full Learn Not to Burn curriculum. The resource books use a four-step program for children in kindergarten or grade one; step one includes songs and finger plays, step two includes puppets with suggested activities, step three includes a play for the class to perform, and step four includes instructions and a masthead for developing a classroom fire safety newsletter. The set include a teacher's manual and an individual book for each of the four levels of activities.

Contact: National Fire Protection Association, One Batterymarch Park, Quincy, MA 02169, Telephone: (617) 770-3000 Secondary Telephone: (800) 344-3555 Contact Phone: (800) 344-3555 Fax: (617) 770-0700 Web Site: http://www.nfpa.org $36.50 per set; discounts available for bulk orders; teacher's guide $16.00.

Keywords: Burns, Children, Curricula, Elementary schools, Fires, Prevention, Residential injuries

National Center for Injury Prevention and Control. 2009. CDC injury research agenda. Atlanta, GA: National Center for Injury Prevention and Control, 116 pp.

Annotation: This document describes the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's research agenda, 2009-2018, which focuses on answering questions that will have a relatively rapid impact on how we prevent injuries and reduce their consequences. Topics include cross-cutting priorities for injury research, injury response; unintentional injury prevention at home and in the community, preventing injuries in sports, recreation, and exercise, (4) preventing transportation injuries; preventing child maltreatment, sexual violence and intimate partner violence, preventing suicidal behavior, and preventing youth violence.

Contact: National Center for Injury Prevention and Control, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 4770 Buford Highway, N.E., Mailstop F-63, Atlanta, GA 30341-3717, Telephone: (800) CDC-INFO Secondary Telephone: (888) 232-6348 Fax: (770) 488-4760 E-mail: cdcinfo@cdc.gov Web Site: http://www.cdc.gov/injury/index.html Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent behavior, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Child abuse, Communities, Disabilities, Domestic violence, Injuries, Injury prevention, Motor vehicle injuries, Recreational injuries, Rehabilitation, Research, Residential injuries, Sports injuries, Suicide prevention, Violence, Violence prevention

Children's Safety Network. 1994. Building safe communities: State and local strategies for preventing injury and violence. Arlington, VA: National Center for Education in Maternal and Child Health, 190 pp.

Annotation: This manual provides descriptions of injury prevention projects implemented in several states. These projects were carried out by state and local departments of health, and by other health/injury-related entities. Interventions cover 12 specific injuries and two overarching contributing factors—firearms and alcohol. For each project, the manual describes the problem, the project objective(s), components, maternal and child health (MCH) role, resources needed, lessons learned, and evaluation. These cases represent concrete examples of what has been tried, what has worked, and what has not. The case studies are indexed by age group protected, by primary target audience, by state, and by MCH setting. Appendices include nine key injury prevention activities for state MCH agencies, and a sample case study format. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: Maternal and Child Health Library at Georgetown University, Telephone: (202) 784-9770 E-mail: mchgroup@georgetown.edu Web Site: https://www.mchlibrary.org Available for loan.

Keywords: Alcohol, Assault, Bicycles, Burns, Case studies, Correlates of injury, Drowning, Evaluation, Family violence, Firearms, Homicide, Injury prevention, Motor vehicles, Occupational injuries, Playgrounds, Program development, Residential injuries, Sexual abuse, Sports, Suicide

Children's Safety Network. 1991. A data book of child and adolescent injury. Washington, DC: National Center for Education in Maternal and Child Health, 69 pp., 41 slides.

Annotation: This data book and a related set of slides present information on the nature and incidence of unintentional and intentional injuries among U.S. children and adolescents ages 1–19. The book is divided into five sections: (1) Overview—comparisons between injury and diseases, international comparisons; (2) mortality—major causes of injury by developmental stage, mortality data compared to morbidity data; (3) unintentional injury—motor vehicles, pedestrians, bicycles, drowning and near drowning, fires and burns, unintentional firearms, poisoning, falls, occupational injuries, farm injuries, sports, toys and recreational equipment; (4) violence—homicide, assault, suicide, child abuse and neglect, rape; and (5) interventions—chart by age group, the cost of injury, suggestions for ways to prevent child and adolescent injury. An appendix presents 1988 injury mortality rates for children ages 1–4, 5–9, 10–14, and 15–19, for 11 major injury categories. Federal agencies contributing data include the National Center for Health Statistics, National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, Consumer Product Safety Commission, Department of Justice, and National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: Maternal and Child Health Library at Georgetown University, Telephone: (202) 784-9770 E-mail: mchgroup@georgetown.edu Web Site: https://www.mchlibrary.org Publication and slides available for loan; publication also available from ERIC Document Reproduction Service, 7420 Fullerton Road, Suite 110, Springfield, VA 22153-2852. Telephone: (800) 443-ERIC / e-mail: EDRS@inet.ed.gov / website: http://edrs.com/; gopher://edrs.com. Document Number: HRSA Info. Ctr. MCHE049; MCHF098 (slides), MCHF108 (brochure); book ERIC ED 342 152.

Keywords: Adolescent health, Adolescents, Advocacy, Audiovisual materials, Child development, Child health, Children, Costs, Data, Firearm injuries, Infants, Injuries, Integration, Morbidity, Mortality, Occupational injuries, Planning, Preschool children, Recreational injuries, Residential injuries, Safety equipment, Schools, Slides, Suicide, Toddlers, Transportation injuries, Violence

National Committee for Injury Prevention and Control. 1989. Injury prevention: Meeting the challenge. New York, NY: Oxford University Press, 303 pp., exec. summ. (26 pp.).

Annotation: This book and its executive summary were produced by the multidisciplinary National Committee for Injury Prevention and Control as a tool for practitioners and a companion piece to "Injury in America" which focused on research issues. It provides guidelines for problem identification, working with and learning from data, program design and evaluation and program implementation. Possible collaborators and funders in injury prevention are described. Chapters devoted to violence prevention explore assaultive injury, child abuse, domestic violence, elder abuse, rape and sexual assault, suicide and firearm injury. Each chapter describes the magnitude of the intentional injury problem, risk factors, prevention, interventions and recommendations. The publication represents the collaborative efforts of the Maternal and Child Health Bureau, the Division of Injury Epidemiology and Control of the Centers for Disease Control, and the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration of the U. S. Department of Transportation.

Keywords: Child abuse, Injury prevention, Occupational injuries, Residential injuries, Traffic injuries, Violence

Massachusetts Department of Public Health, Division of Family Health Services, Statewide Comprehensive Injury Prevention Program. 1987. Injuries in Massachusetts: A status report. Boston, MA: Massachusetts Department of Public Health, 94 pp.

Annotation: This document presents a picture of injuries in the State of Massachusetts in a five-year period. The surveillance and research produced a look at how injuries occur and to whom, the number and rate of injuries at the local level and made recommendations on injury prevention programming for Massachusetts. Injury pictures produced profiles on age, sex, cause of injury, potential years of life lost and a breakdown of injuries by locality. Specific interventions and recommendations were included in the conclusion. A summary report is also available. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: Massachusetts Department of Public Health, Injury Prevention and Control Program, 250 Washington Street, Fourth Floor, Boston, MA 02108, Telephone: (617) 624-5557 Contact Phone: (617) 727-1246 Available in libraries.

Keywords: Data, Emergency room data, External cause of injury codes, Hospital discharge data, Injury prevention, Intervention, Mortality, Needs assessment, Population surveillance, Research, Residential injuries, State plans, Transportation injuries

Massachusetts Department of Public Health, Division of Family Health Services, Statewide Comprehensive Injury Prevention Program. 1986. Safestate, safehome inspector's notes. Boston, MA: Massachusetts Department of Public Health, Statewide Comprehensive Injury Prevention Program, 28 pp.

Annotation: This product from a SPRANS project of SCIPP and the Massachusetts Department of Public Health describes the SAFEHOME program. The program's goal was to reduce the number of serious residential injuries to children 6 years old and under, by reducing hazards and promoting safe practices in the home. At the core of the program is a HOME SAFETY CHECK which can be done in a 15-minute version or the 1-hour full check. The program involves a trained SAFEHOME inspector who, using the SAFEHOME Checklist, goes with the parents or caretakers on a room by room tour. Conditions that pose risks to children are explained by the inspector along with changes that will make for a SAFEHOME. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: Massachusetts Department of Public Health, Injury Prevention and Control Program, 250 Washington Street, Fourth Floor, Boston, MA 02108, Telephone: (617) 624-5557 Contact Phone: (617) 727-1246

Keywords: Burns, Child safety, Choking, Falls, Household safety, Injury prevention, Massachusetts, Poisoning, Residential injuries, Scalds, State programs

   

This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number U02MC31613, MCH Advanced Education Policy, $3.5 M. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.