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Strengthening the evidence for maternal and child health programs

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Items in this list may be obtained from the sources cited. Contact information reflects the most current data about the source that has been provided to the MCH Digital Library.


Displaying records 1 through 20 (32 total).

Herndon JB. 2016. Final report on testing pediatric oral health care performance measures: Tooth mortality of primary teeth and treatment after sealant placement on permanent molars. Chicago, IL: American Dental Association, 19 pp.

Annotation: This report provides information about validation testing for pediatric oral health performance measures. Topics include tooth mortality and treatment following dental sealant placement. Contents include background, data sources, and key testing findings.

Contact: American Dental Association, 211 East Chicago Avenue, Chicago, IL 60611-2678, Telephone: (312) 440-2500 Fax: (312) 440-7494 E-mail: info@ada.org Web Site: http://www.ada.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Children, Dental care, Dental sealants, Dentistry, Health services delivery, Measures, Oral health, Outcome and process assessment, Pediatric care, Quality assurance, Research design, Research methodology

Borrud L, Chiappa MM, Burt VL, Gahche J, Zipf G, Dohrmann SM, Johnson CL. 2014. National health and nutrition examination survey: National youth fitness survey plan, operations, and analysis, 2012. Hyattsville, MD: National Center for Health Statistics, 16 pp. (Vital and health statistics; Series 2, Data evaluation and methods research; no. 163)

Annotation: The report provides information about the plan, operations, and analysis of the first national-level survey to estimate the physical activity and fitness levels of children and adolescents ages 3-15 in the United States. Contents include information on the planning and sample design; ethical, privacy, and confidentiality considerations; field operations; mobile examination center operations; a report of findings and remuneration; and data release and analytic guidelines.

Contact: National Center for Health Statistics, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 3311 Toledo Road, Room 5419, Hyattsville, MD 20782, Telephone: (800) 232-4636 Secondary Telephone: (888) 232-6348 Fax: (301) 458-4020 E-mail: nchsquery@cdc.gov Web Site: http://www.cdc.gov/nchs Available from the website. Document Number: DHHS Pub. No. 2014–1363.

Keywords: Adolescents, Children, Confidentiality, Data analysis, Data collection, Evaluation methods, National surveys, Physical activity, Physical fitness, Research design

World Health Organization. 2013. Oral health surveys: Basic methods (5th ed.). Geneva, Switzerland: World Health Organization, 66 pp.

Annotation: This manual provides guidelines for assessing the oral health status of a population and determining need for oral health intervention. The manual aims to encourage national oral health survey planners to standardize measurements of oral diseases and conditions that are important for planning and evaluating oral health programs, as well as to ensure the comparability of data collected in a wide range of environments. The manual advocates applying the World Health Organization (WHO) global approach to chronic-disease-surveillance to an operational model for the integration of oral health into chronic disease surveillance systems. Topics include basic principles of oral health surveys, oral health self-assessment, and obtaining assistance from WHO.

Contact: World Health Organization, 20, Avenue Appia, Geneva, Switzerland , Telephone: (+ 41 22) 791 21 11 Fax: (+ 41 22) 791 3111 E-mail: info@who.int Web Site: http://www.who.int/en Available from the website. Document Number: ISBN 9789241548649.

Keywords: Data analysis, Data collection, International health, Oral health, Research design, Research methodology, Surveys, World Health Organization

Kirkendall N; Institute of Medicine, Committee on National Statistics. 2013. Design of the National Children's Study: A workshop summary. Washington, DC: National Academies Press, 94 pp.

Annotation: This summary reports on a January 2013 workshop on issues related to the overall design (including the framework for implementation) of the National Children's Study (NCS). The NCS is designed to study the environmental influences (including physical, chemical, biological, and psychosocial) on children's health and development. Summary contents include environmental measures, consideration of multiple cohorts in the sample design, imputation and estimation, and moving forward. The workshop agenda, a list of participants, and information on the Committee on National Statistics are also included.

Contact: National Academies Press, 500 Fifth Street, N.W., Keck 360, Washington, DC 20001, Telephone: (202) 334-3313 Secondary Telephone: (888) 624-8373 Fax: (202) 334-2451 E-mail: customer_service@nap.edu Web Site: http://www.nap.edu Available from the website. Document Number: ISBN 978-309-28840-8.

Keywords: Chemicals, Child health, Children, Environmental influences, Meetings, Physical development, Prospective studies, Psychosocial development, Research design

Harvard Clinical and Translational Science Center, Community Health Innovation and Research Program. 2013. Toolkit for building primary care research at your community health center. Cambridge, MA: Harvard Clinical and Translational Science Center, Community Health Innovation and Research Program, 8 modules.

Annotation: This toolkit is designed to provide clinical and administrative staff at community health centers with the essentials needed to build a primary care research infrastructure. Organized into eight stand-alone audio-recorded modules, the toolkit helps health center clinicians and staff find information on: (1) introduction to quality improvement and research, (2) building primary care research infrastructure, (3) data: access and utilization, (4) study design and methods overview, (5) dissemination and action, (6) funding research, (7) partnerships for research, and (8) ethics and the Institutional Review Board. Appendices are included after each module to provide access to sample agreements, forms, policies, slides, and worksheets.

Contact: Harvard University, T.H. Chan School of Public Health, 677 Huntington Avenue, Boston, MA 02115, Telephone: (617) 495-1000 Web Site: https://www.hsph.harvard.edu Available from the website.

Keywords: Collaboration, Community health centers, Data collection, Data sources, Ethics, Fundraising, Primary care, Qualitative evaluation, Research, Research design, Research methodology

Burwick A, Strong D, Xue Y, Koball H, Coffee-Borden B, Zaveri H, Boller K, Daro D. 2012. Supporting evidence-based home visiting to prevent child maltreatment: Cross-site evaluation cost study background and design update. Princeton, NJ: Mathematica Policy Research; Chicago, IL: Chapin Hall at the University of Chicago, 22 pp. (Supporting evidence-based home visiting to prevent child maltreatment)

Annotation: This report provides background and design information for assessing the costs of home visiting programs that aim to prevent child maltreatment. Topics include the purpose of cost analyses, existing literature on the costs of home visiting program models, study design, and approaches to the collection and analysis of cross-site cost study data.

Contact: FRIENDS National Resource Center for Community-Based Child Abuse Prevention, Chapel Hill Training Outreach Project, 800 Eastowne Drive, Suite 105, Chapel Hill, NC 27514, Web Site: http://www.friendsnrc.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Costs, Evaluation methods, Home visiting, Maltreated children, Prevention programs, Research design

National Registry of Evidence-Based Programs and Practices. 2012. Non-researcher's guide to evidence-based program evaluation. Rockville, MD: Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Adminstration, 48 pp.

Annotation: This course provides a basic overview of program evaluation including the goals of evaluation, types of evaluation, and common study designs. It provides general guidance on how to successfully plan, conduct, and manage an evaluation. The course also covers how to address research quality and disseminate findings so that the results of the evaluation will have maximum impact.

Contact: National Registry of Evidence-Based Programs and Practices, Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Adminstration, One Choke Cherry Road, Rockville, MD Telephone: (877) SAMHSA-7 Secondary Telephone: (877) 726-4727 Web Site: http://www.nrepp.samhsa.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Distance education, Information dissemination, Program evaluation, Program management, Program planning, Research design, Training

MDRC. 2011. Building a culture of quality in home visitation. New York, NY: MDRC,

Annotation: This webinar focused on the essential prerequisites to developing and implementing a continuous quality improvement (CQI) strategy in home visiting programs. The webinar was held on January 13, 2011, the first in a series of technical assistance webinars. The series is part of the Design Options for Home Visiting Evaluation (DOHVE) project, sponsored by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, which is providing technical assistance to grantees of the federal home visiting program and developing design options for conducting a national evaluation of the federal initiative.

Contact: MDRC, 16 East 34th Street, 19th Floor, New York, NY 10016-4326, Telephone: (212) 532-3200 Fax: (212) 684-0832 E-mail: information@mdrc.org Web Site: http://www.mdrc.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Federal initiatives, Home visiting, Program evaluation, Quality assurance, Research design, Technical assistance

Meyers D, Peikes D, Lundquist DS, Genevro J. 2011. Improving evaluations of the medical home. Rockville, MD: U.S. Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, 4 pp. (Patient-Centered Medical Home Decisionmaker Brief)

Annotation: This brief highlights six key recommendations for evaluators and those considering commissioning evaluations of the patient-centered medical home model. Contents include the rationale and examples in practice for each recommendation. The brief accompanies a white paper on this topic, which is also available from the website.

Contact: U.S. Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, 5600 Fishers Lane, Rockville, MD 20857, Telephone: (301) 427-1104 Secondary Telephone: (301) 427-1364 Web Site: http://www.ahrq.gov Available from the website. Document Number: AHRQ Publication No. 11-0091.

Keywords: Cost effectiveness, Evidence based health care, Medical home, Program improvement, Quality assurance, Quantitative evaluation, Research design, Research methodology, Treatment effectiveness

Peikes D, Dale S, Lundquist E, Genevro J, Meyers D. 2011. Building the evidence base for the medical home: What sample and sample size do studies need?. Rockville, MD: U.S. Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, 46 pp.

Annotation: This paper provides suggestions for generating evidence on the effects of the patient-centered medical home (PCMH) model. The paper focuses on quantitative evaluations designed to measure effectiveness. Topics include accounting for clustering inherent in effectiveness research, determining what effect sizes a given study can expect to detect, approximating the number of clients and practices required to detect policy-relevant yet achievable effects, and varying the outcomes and types of clients included in the analyses to improve a study's ability to detect true effects. An accompanying brief highlights key recommendations for evaluators and those considering commissioning evaluations of the PCMH model.

Contact: U.S. Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, 5600 Fishers Lane, Rockville, MD 20857, Telephone: (301) 427-1104 Secondary Telephone: (301) 427-1364 Web Site: http://www.ahrq.gov Available from the website. Document Number: AHRQ Publication No. 11-0100-EF.

Keywords: Cost effectiveness, Evidence based health care, Medical home, Program improvement, Quality assurance, Quantitative evaluation, Research design, Research methodology, Treatment effectiveness

Hargreaves MB. 2010. Evaluating system change: A planning guide. Princeton, NJ: Mathematica, 20 pp. (Methods brief)

Annotation: This methods brief provides guidance on planning effective evaluations of system change interventions. It begins with a general overview of systems theory and then outlines a three-part process for designing system change evaluations. This three-part process aligns (1) the dynamics of the targeted system or situation, (2) the dynamics of the system change intervention, and (3) the intended purpose(s) and methods of the evaluation. It discusses how incorporating systems theory and dynamics into evaluation planning can improve an evaluation's design by capturing system conditions, dynamics, and points of influence that affect the operation and impact of a system change intervention. The goal is to provide an introduction to system change evaluation planning and design and to encourage funders, program planners, managers, and evaluators to seek out more information and apply systems methods in their own evaluation work.

Contact: Mathematica Policy Research, P.O. Box 2393, Princeton, NJ 08543-2393, Telephone: (609) 799-3535 Fax: (609) 799-0005 E-mail: info@mathematica-mpr.com Web Site: http://www.mathematica-mpr.com Available from the website.

Keywords: Evaluation methods, Program evaluation, Research design, Research methodology, Service delivery systems

Lang TA, Secic M. 2006. How to report statistics in medicine: Annotated guidelines for authors, editors, and reviewers [2nd ed]. Philadelphia, PA: American College of Physicians, 490 pp. (Medical writing and communication)

Annotation: This book is a guide to understanding and presenting statistical information for authors, editors, and reviewers who prepare or evaluate biomedical research articles for publication. It is divided into four parts: annotated guidelines for reporting statistical information; guidelines to statistical terms and tests; an unannotated, referenced list of guidelines; and appendices on reporting clinical trials, mathematical symbols and notation, rules for presenting numbers in text, and spelling of statistical terms and tests. In addition, there is a bibliography listing the articles and books on which the guidelines are based.

Contact: American College of Physicians, 190 North Independence Mall West, Philadelphia, PA 19106-1572, Telephone: (215) 351-2400 Secondary Telephone: (800) 523-1546 Contact Phone: (215) 351-2620 Web Site: https://www.acponline.org Available in libraries. Document Number: ISBN 0-943126-44-4.

Keywords: Analysis of covariance, Analysis of variance, Guidelines, Multivariate analysis, Research design, Research methodology, Sampling studies, Statistics, Writing

U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. [2005]. Research-based web design and usability guidelines. Washington, DC: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, 267 pp.

Annotation: These revised guidelines were developed to help managers, designers, and others involved in creating websites base their decisions on the most current and best available information. The guidelines are particularly relevant to the design of information-oriented sites but can be applied across a wide spectrum of sites. Researchers who investigate web design issues may also find the guidelines useful. The guidelines strive to contribute to the creation of better health and human services websites, provide quantified peer-reviewed website design guidelines, and stimulate research in areas that will influence the creation of useful websites.

Contact: U.S. Government Publishing Office, 732 North Capitol Street, N.W., Washington, DC 20401, Telephone: (202) 512-1800 Secondary Telephone: (866) 512-1800 Fax: (202) 512-2104 E-mail: contactcenter@gpo.gov Web Site: http://www.gpo.gov Available from the website. Document Number: ISBN 0-16-076270-7.

Keywords: Design, Graphic design, Guidelines, Health, Information, Information sources, Research, Resource materials, World wide web

Blumberg SJ, Olson L, Frankel MR, Osborn L, Giambo P. 2005. Design and operation of the National Survey of Early Childhood Health, 2003. Hyattsville, MD: National Center for Health Statistics, 109 pp. (Vital and health statistics: Series 1, Program and collection procedures; no. 40)

Annotation: COMPARE This report presents the development, plan, and operation of the National Survey of Early Childhood Health, a module of the State and Local Area Integrated Telephone Survey, conducted by the National Center for Health Statistics. The survey was designed to assess parents' perceptions of their children's pediatric care. The report outlines key features of the survey, background information, sample design, the questionnaire, survey operations, data files, estimation procedures, quality control, and guidelines for data use. References are provided. The appendices include a sampling and sampling weight technical summary; related survey content and sources of questions; computer-assisted telephone interviewing specifications; a sample advance letter; and disposition code frequencies and response rate calculations.

Contact: National Center for Health Statistics, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 3311 Toledo Road, Room 5419, Hyattsville, MD 20782, Telephone: (800) 232-4636 Secondary Telephone: (888) 232-6348 Fax: (301) 458-4020 E-mail: nchsquery@cdc.gov Web Site: http://www.cdc.gov/nchs Available from the website.

Keywords: COMPARE Surveys, Child health, Evaluation, Health promotion, National surveys, Patient satisfaction, Pediatric care, Research design, Young children

U.S. Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality. 2003. Creating partnerships, improving health: The role of community-based participatory research. [Rockville, MD]: U.S. Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, 9 pp.

Annotation: This brochure focuses on community-based participatory research (CBPR), a type of research that actively involves the community being studied. The brochure discusses how CBPR is different and how a community can make sure that its involvement is worthwhile, why health-related research has had to change, challenges that CBPR partners face, and how to get involved. A national meeting on CBPR that took place in November 2001 is also discussed. The brochure contains a list of resources as well as descriptions of different perspectives on CBPR, two from communities' points of view and one from a researcher's point of view.

Contact: U.S. Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, 5600 Fishers Lane, Rockville, MD 20857, Telephone: (301) 427-1104 Secondary Telephone: (301) 427-1364 Web Site: http://www.ahrq.gov Available at no charge; also available from the website.

Keywords: Community health services, Community participation, Community surveys, Health promotion, Low income groups, Medical research, Research design

Blumberg SJ, Olson L, Osborn L, Srinath KP, Harrison H. 2002. Design and operation of the National Survey of Early Childhood Health, 2000. Hyattsville, MD: National Center for Health Statistics, 97 pp. (Vital and health statistics: Series 1, Program and collection procedures, no. 40)

Annotation: This report presents the development, plan, and operation of the National Survey of Early Childhood Health, a module of the State and Local Area Integrated Telephone Survey, conducted by the National Center for Health Statistics. The survey was designed to assess parents' perceptions of their children's pediatric care. The report outlines key features of the survey, background information, sample design, the questionnaire, survey operations, data files, estimation procedures, quality control, and guidelines for data use. References are provided. The appendices include a sampling and sampling weight technical summary; related survey content and sources of questions; computer-assisted telephone interviewing specifications; a sample advance letter; and disposition code frequencies and response rate calculations.

Contact: National Center for Health Statistics, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 3311 Toledo Road, Room 5419, Hyattsville, MD 20782, Telephone: (800) 232-4636 Secondary Telephone: (888) 232-6348 Fax: (301) 458-4020 E-mail: nchsquery@cdc.gov Web Site: http://www.cdc.gov/nchs Available from the website.

Keywords: Child health, Evaluation, Health promotion, National surveys, Patient satisfaction, Pediatric care, Research design, Surveys, Young children

Li RM, McCardle P, Clark RL, Kinsella K, Berch D, eds. 2001. Diverse voices: The inclusion of language-minority populations in national studies—Challenges and opportunities. Bethesda, MD: National Institute on Aging, National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, 42 pp.

Annotation: This report summarizes a workshop held at the National Institutes of Health in Bethesda, MD, on July 27-28, 2000, on the barriers to and the inclusion of language-minority populations in national studies. Participants included demographers, statisticians, sociologists, psychologists, linguists, anthropologists, experts in emerging computerized translation technologies, representatives of major private survey organizations and translation agencies, opinion leaders, and representatives of federal agencies. Report sections include a description of language-minority populations; a review of challenges for including language-minority populations; sampling, measuring, and interviewing these populations; and technological innovation and linguistic logistics. The report also includes an executive summary, summary of barriers to inclusion and enabling inclusion, and references. The appendices include recent and current-practice examples, the workshop agenda, biographical sketches of presenters, and a list of workshop participants.

Contact: Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, Information Resource Center, P.O. Box 3006, Rockville, MD 20847, Telephone: (800) 370-2943 Secondary Telephone: Fax: (866) 760-5947 E-mail: NICHDInformationResourceCenter@mail.nih.gov Web Site: http://www.nichd.nih.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Cultural diversity, Cultural sensitivity, Language barriers, Limited English speakers, National Institutes of Health, National programs, Research design, Research methodology, Surveys, Translations

Schonlau M, Fricker RD, Elliott MN. 2001. Conducting research surveys via e-mail and the Web. Santa Monica, CA: Rand, 118 pp.

Annotation: This book provides practical information for researchers who are contemplating using the Internet in their survey activities. The authors examine the reported strengths and limitations of using the Internet to conduct research surveys and offers guidelines. Chapter topics include background on the survey process; a literature review of Web and e-mail surveys; choosing between the various types of Internet surveys; guidelines for designing and implementing Internet surveys; and case studies. The appendices include a literature review of response rates, a summary of evidence in the literature, and a discussion of using a convenience sample to supplement a probability sample. References conclude the book.

Contact: Rand Corporation, 1776 Main Street, Santa Monica, CA 90407-3208, Telephone: (310) 393-0411 Fax: 310-393-4818 E-mail: correspondence@rand.org Web Site: http://www.rand.org Available from the website. Document Number: ISBN 0-8330-3110-4.

Keywords: Internet, Research design, Research methodology, Surveys

Blumberg SJ, Olson L, Frankel M, Osborn L, Becker CJ, Srinath KP, Giambo P. 2001. Design and operation of the National Survey of Children with Special Health Care Needs, 2001. Hyattsville, MD: National Center for Health Statistics, 132 pp. (Vital and health statistics: Series 1, Program and collection procedures; no. 41)

Annotation: This report presents the development, plan, and operation of the National Survey of Children with Special Health Care Needs, a module of the State and Local Area Integrated Telephone Survey, conducted by the National Center for Health Statistics. The survey was designed to assess parents' perceptions of their children's pediatric care. The report outlines key features of the survey, background information, sample design, the questionnaire, survey operations, data files, estimation procedures, quality control, and guidelines for data use. References are provided. The appendices include a sampling and sampling weight technical summary; related survey content and sources of questions; computer-assisted telephone interviewing specifications; a sample advance letter; and disposition code frequencies and response rate calculations.

Contact: National Center for Health Statistics, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 3311 Toledo Road, Room 5419, Hyattsville, MD 20782, Telephone: (800) 232-4636 Secondary Telephone: (888) 232-6348 Fax: (301) 458-4020 E-mail: nchsquery@cdc.gov Web Site: http://www.cdc.gov/nchs $20.00; also available from the website. Document Number: DHHS (PHS) 2003-1317.

Keywords: Child health, Children with special health care needs, Evaluation, Health promotion, National surveys, Patient satisfaction, Pediatric care, Research design, Surveys

McGlynn EA, Kerr EA, Damberg CL, Asch SM, eds. 2000. Quality of care for women: A review of selected clinical conditions and quality indicators. Santa Monica, CA: Rand, 432 pp.

Annotation: This book, written for clinicians, health plans, insurers, and health services researchers, describes QA Tools, a comprehensive, clinically based system for assessing care for women. The quality indicators that comprise these Tools cover 46 clinical areas and all 4 functions of medicine - screening, diagnosis, treatment, and follow-up. The introduction discusses how the clinical areas were selected, how the indicators were chosen, and what is included in the overall system. The rest of the volume is organized into chapters that summarize the results of the literature for one condition, provides a table of staff recommended indicators based on that review, and lists the cited studies in a references section. Appendix A provides definitions of terms used in the indicators tables. Appendix B contains the panel rating sheets for each condition. Appendix C contains a crosswalk table of original and final indicators. Tables and figures are used frequently throughout the chapters.

Contact: Rand Corporation, 1776 Main Street, Santa Monica, CA 90407-3208, Telephone: (310) 393-0411 Fax: 310-393-4818 E-mail: correspondence@rand.org Web Site: http://www.rand.org Available in libraries. Document Number: ISBN 0-8330-2923-1.

Keywords: Literature reviews, Qualitative evaluation, Research design, Service delivery, Women's health

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This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number U02MC31613, MCH Advanced Education Policy, $3.5 M. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.