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Strengthening the evidence for maternal and child health programs

Search Results: MCHLine

Items in this list may be obtained from the sources cited. Contact information reflects the most current data about the source that has been provided to the MCH Digital Library.


Displaying records 1 through 20 (239 total).

National Birth Defects Prevention Network. 2017. National birth defects prevention month. Houston, TX: National Birth Defects Prevention Network, multiple items.

Annotation: These materials and resources are designed to assist state program staff and others interested in promoting birth defects prevention during "January is Birth Defects Prevention Month." Contents include fact sheets, pamphlets, and posters about birth defects, preconception health, infections and immunizations, and healthy lifestyle. Topics include what you should know about birth defects, including congenital heart defects; folic acid and fetal alcohol syndrome; toxoplasmosis, cytomegalovirus, and tips on preventing infections during pregnancy; and diabetes, smoking, and domestic violence. The resources are available in English and Spanish.

Contact: National Birth Defects Prevention Network, 1321 Upland Drive, Suite 1561, Houston, TX 77043, E-mail: nbdpn@nbdpn.org Web Site: https://www.nbdpn.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Congenital abnormalities, Gestational diabetes, Preconception care, Prevention, Public awareness campaigns, Reproductive health, Spanish language materials

U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and U.S. Food and Drug Administration. 2017. Advice about eating fish: What pregnant women & parents should know (upd.). [Silver Spring, MD]: U.S. Food and Drug Administration, 1 p.

Annotation: This chart is designed to help pregnant women and parents choose which fish to eat, and how often to eat them, based on their mercury levels. Contents include best choices (lowest levels of mercury), good choices, and choices to avoid (highest mercury levels) and the number of servings per day. A description of serving sizes for adults and young children (ages 4 to 7) is included.

Contact: U.S. Food and Drug Administration, 10903 New Hampshire Ave., Silver Spring, MD 20993, Telephone: (888) 463-6332 Fax: (301) 443-3100 Web Site: http://www.fda.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Child development, Child health, Children, Consumer education materials, Decision making, Environmental exposures, Environmental pollution, Nutrition, Parents, Pregnant women, Reproductive hazards

Chen A, Wilson D. 2017. How Medicaid expansion benefits maternal and child health. Washington, DC: National Health Law Program, 5 pp.

Annotation: This brief explains how the Affordable Care Act (ACA), through Medicaid expansion and expanded Medicaid coverage criteria for children, has improved maternal and child health (MCH). Topics include the impact of expanded coverage for women of reproductive age, particularly for preconception and interconception health care, and eligibility criteria for children ages 6 to 19 on MCH.

Contact: National Health Law Program, 1441 I Street, N.W., Suite 1105, Washington, DC 20005, Telephone: (202) 289-7724 E-mail: nhelp@healthlaw.org Web Site: http://www.healthlaw.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Child health, Children, Chronic illnesses and disabilities, Health care reform, Health insurance, Health status, Maternal health, Maternal health services, Medicaid, Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act, Preconception care, Pregnant women, Prenatal care, Reproductive health, Women's health

U.S. Preventive Services Task Force. 2017. Preeclampsia: Screening. Rockville, MD: U.S. Preventive Services Task Force,

Annotation: This resource presents the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force recommendation on screening for preeclampsia in pregnant women with blood pressure measurements throughout pregnancy. The recommendation statement; supporting documents, including the research plan, evidence review, evidence summary, clinical summary; and related information for health professionals.

Contact: U.S. Preventive Services Task Force, 540 Gaither Road, Rockville, MD 20850, Telephone: (301) 427-1584 Web Site: http://www.uspreventiveservicestaskforce.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Childbirth, Evidence based medicine, Hospitals, Preeclampsia, Pregnancy induced hypertension, Pregnant women, Prenatal care, Reproductive health, Screening, Women's health

University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill School of Medicine, Center for Maternal and Infant Health. 2017. W.K. Kellogg Foundation Report: May 2017–The National Preconception Health & Health Care Initiative. Chapel Hill, NC: University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill School of Medicine, Center for Maternal and Infant Health, 11 pp.

Annotation: This report summarizes activities and outcomes from a project to integrate and implement preconception care into clinic and community settings. Contents include information about the project's progress toward meeting the goal and objectives, future plans, and dissemination. Topics include reframing and diversifying messages; launching a consumer-facing campaign; partnering with preconception peer educators; implementing a pregnancy intention screening tool; engaging, training, and providing technical assistance to clinics and health care systems; and catalyzing change by convening meetings. Environment, challenges, opportunities, collaboration and observations are discussed.

Contact: University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill School of Medicine, Center for Maternal and Infant Health, Old Clinic Building, Room 3018, Campus Box 7181, Chapel Hill, NC 27599-7181, Telephone: (919) 843-7865 Fax: (919) 843-7865 E-mail: cmih@med.unc.edu Web Site: https://www.mombaby.org/ Available from the website.

Keywords: Clinics, Communication, Community based services, Men's health, National initiatives, Organizational change, Outcome and process assessment, Peer education, Preconception care, Prevention programs, Program development, Public awareness campaigns, Public private partnerships, Reproductive health, Screening, Service integration, Technical assistance, Training, Women's health

University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill School of Medicine, Center for Maternal and Infant Health. 2017. The National Preconception Health & Health Care Initiative: W.K. Kellogg Foundation Evaluation Report–April 2017. Chapel Hill, NC: University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill School of Medicine, Center for Maternal and Infant Health, 6 pp.

Annotation: This report summarizes the impact of a national preconception outreach and education initiative for young men and women and clinicians. Contents include media metrics following the launch of national consumer website and social media platform to increase the visibility of preconception health messages and provide young adults with essential, evidence-based information to improve their health, reduce their risks, and improve birth outcomes. Topics include launch results and analytic snapshot and information about the related grantee and preconception peer educator ambassador programs. Additional contents summarize the impact of a partnership to integrate preconception health into routine clinical care using a learning collaborative, peer-reviewed publications, a website, traditional media, social media, expanded conversations, conferences and webinars, and a national newsletter.

Contact: University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill School of Medicine, Center for Maternal and Infant Health, Old Clinic Building, Room 3018, Campus Box 7181, Chapel Hill, NC 27599-7181, Telephone: (919) 843-7865 Fax: (919) 843-7865 E-mail: cmih@med.unc.edu Web Site: https://www.mombaby.org/ Available from the website.

Keywords: Clinics, Communication, Community based services, Mass media, Measures, Men's health, National initiatives, Organizational change, Peer education, Preconception care, Prevention programs, Program evaluation, Public awareness campaigns, Public private partnerships, Reproductive health, Screening, Service integration, Technical assistance, Training, Women's health

American College of Rheumatology, Lupus Foundation of America. 2017. Be Fierce. Take Control™. Atlanta, GA: American College of Rheumatology; Washington, DC: Lupus Foundation of America, multiple items.

Annotation: This public health campaign website was launched with the goal of educating and empowering young African American and Latino women (including those ages 15-18), who are most at-risk for developing lupus, to be aware of it signs and symptoms. The campaign uses the web, social media, digital advertising, and audience engagement to reach young women and educate them about the signs and symptoms of lupus. The campaign website also provides tools and resources such as the Lupus Foundation of America’s “Could it Be Lupus?” interactive questionnaire so those with possible symptoms can learn how to take that next step and talk to their health care provider.

Contact: Lupus Foundation of America, 2000 L Street, N.W., Suite 410, Washington, DC 20036, Telephone: (202) 349-1155 Secondary Telephone: (800) 558-0121 Fax: (202) 349-1156 Web Site: http://www.lupus.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent health, Advocacy, African Americans, Autoimmune diseases, Early intervention programs, Empowerment, Ethnic factors, Hispanic Americans, Lupus erythematosus, Prevention programs, Public awareness campaigns, Reproductive health, Risk factors, Self care, Women's health

U.S. Health Resources and Services Administration. 2016. Women's preventive services: Required health plan coverage guidelines. [Rockville, MD]: U.S. Health Resources and Services Administration,

Annotation: This website provides information about required health plan coverage guidelines for women's preventive services under the Affordable Care Act. It includes a table listing type of preventive service, guidelines for health insurance coverage, and frequency of coverage. Preventive service types listed include well-woman visits, gestational diabetes screening, human papillomavirus testing, counseling for sexually transmitted infections, counseling and screening for human immune-deficiency virus, contraceptive methods and counseling, and screening and counseling for interpersonal and domestic violence.

Contact: U.S. Health Resources and Services Administration, 5600 Fishers Lane, Rockville, MD 20857, Telephone: (888) 275-4772 Secondary Telephone: (877) 464-4772 Fax: (301) 443-1246 E-mail: ask@hrsa.gov Web Site: http://www.hrsa.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Contraception, Counseling, Domestic violence, Gestational diabetes, HIV screening, Health care reform, Health insurance, Health services, Human papillomavirus, Interpersonal violence, Legislation, Prevention, Reproductive health, Screening, Sexually transmitted infections, Testing, Women's health

McKee C. 2016. Medicaid managed care final regulations and reproductive care. Washington, DC: National Health Law Program, 7 pp. (Issue brief no. 5)

Annotation: This brief reviews implementation requirements governing access to reproductive health services in Medicaid managed care. Topics include network adequacy and access to services, travel time and distance standards, timely availability of services, direct access to providers, information requirements, and utilization controls. Recommendations for states are also included.

Contact: National Health Law Program, 1441 I Street, N.W., Suite 1105, Washington, DC 20005, Telephone: (202) 289-7724 E-mail: nhelp@healthlaw.org Web Site: http://www.healthlaw.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Access to health care, Barriers, Health care utilization, Health services delivery, Medicaid managed care, Provider networks, Regulations, Reproductive health, Standards, Third party payers, Women's health

New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene. 2016. Sexual and reproductive health care best practices for adolescents and adults. New York, NY: New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene, 24 pp.

Annotation: This guide for health care professionals in multiple settings describes best practices for sexual and reproductive health, with a focus on contraceptive care and the prevention, screening, and testing of sexually transmitted infections (STI) and HIV. Contents include information about leading with a sexual and reproductive justice approach; policy and practice recommendations; and best practices specific to the primary care and prenatal, labor and delivery, and postpartum care settings. Additional contents include tools and resources on topics such as contraception care and provision, STI and HIV prevention and treatment, adolescent health care, patient-centered care and the sexual and reproductive justice framework, LGBTQ health care, intimate partner violence and reproductive coercion, health insurance access, and financial assistance and device reimbursement.

Contact: New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene, 2 Lafayette Street, 20th Floor, CN-65, New York, NY 10007, Telephone: (212) 676-2188 E-mail: http://www.nyc.gov/html/mail/html/maildoh.html Web Site: http://www1.nyc.gov/site/doh/index.page Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent health, Contraception, Contraceptive use, Culturally competent services, Family planning, Health promotion, Preventive health services, Primary care, Program improvement, Quality assurance, Reproductive health, Service integration, Sexual health, Sexually transmitted diseases

National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Office on Smoking and Health. 2016. Betel quid with tobacco (gutka). Atlanta, GA: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 1 p.

Annotation: This fact sheet provides information about the use and health effects of betel quid, a combination of betel leaf, areca nut, and slaked lime. Topics include betel quid and gutka (betel quid with tobacco) use by men and women and by region. Health issues associated with the use of betel quid and gutka such as precancerous conditions, cancer, reproductive health problems, and nicotine addiction are also discussed.

Contact: National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Office on Smoking and Health, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 1600 Clifton Road, Atlanta, GA 30329-4027, Telephone: (800) 232-4636 Secondary Telephone: (888) 232-6348 Fax: E-mail: cdcinfo@cdc.gov Web Site: http://www.cdc.gov/tobacco Available from the website.

Keywords: Cancer, Drug effects, Nicotine, Oral health, Pregnant women, Preventive health services, Reproductive health, Risk factors, Smokeless tobacco, Tobacco use

NARAL Pro-Choice America. 2015. Who decides? The status of women's reproductive rights in the United States (24th ed.). Washington, DC: NARAL Pro-Choice America, 90 pp.

Annotation: This document provides findings on pro-choice policy, threats to reproductive choice, and the political landscape. It summarizes the status of anti-choice and pro-choice legislation, and provides profiles of each state. Additional information is available on the website www.whodecides.org.

Contact: NARAL, Pro-Choice America , 1156 15th Street, N.W., Suite 700, Washington, DC 20005, Telephone: (202) 973-3000 Fax: (202) 973-3096 Web Site: http://www.naral.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Abortion, Adolescents, Proposed legislation, Reproductive health, Sexuality education, State legislation, Women

Love HL, Schelar E, Taylor K, Schlitt J, Even M, Burns A, Mackey S, Couillard M, Danaux J, Mizzi A, Surti D, Windham D. 2015. 2013–14 digital census report. Washington, DC: School-Based Health Alliance, 1 v.

Annotation: This report presents findings from a national survey of centers and programs connected with schools to document the role of school-based health centers (SBHCs) in meeting the health care needs of children and adolescents. The report describes the funding sources that support the SBHCs, policies, and characteristics of schools where SBHCs are located. The analysis and data presented in the report include SBHCs that pro- vide primary care. Topics include growth; access; comprehensive care, including behavioral health and oral health care; adolescent care; health system partnerships; sustainability; and accountability. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: School-Based Health Alliance, 1010 Vermont Avenue, N.W., Suite 600, Washington, DC 20005, Telephone: (202) 638-5872 Secondary Telephone: (888) 286-8727 Fax: (202) 638-5879 E-mail: info@nasbhc.org Web Site: http://www.sbh4all.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Data, Early intervention, Mental health services, National surveys, Oral health, Participation, Preventive health services, Primary care, Reproductive health, School based clinics

Women Deliver. 2014. Invest in girls and women: Everybody wins–The path ahead to sustainable development. New York, NY: Women Deliver, 19 pp.

Annotation: This toolkit presents specific tasks and goals related to maternal and newborn health, family planning and reproductive health, women's health, education, and equality, with the aim of providing global partners with a course of action to advocate for the health and well-being of girls and women. Contents include infographics, data points, and key messages to make the case for investing in girls and women.

Contact: Women Deliver, 584 Broadway, Suite 306, New York, NY 10012, Telephone: (646) 695-9100 Fax: (646) 695-9145 E-mail: info@womendeliver.org Web Site: http://www.womendeliver.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent females, Advocacy, Child health, Data, Education, Family planning, Female children, Goals, International health, Maternal health, Reproductive health, Women's health

Henry J. Kaiser Family Foundation. 2014. The U.S. government and international family planning and reproductive health: Statutory requirements and policies. Menlo Park, CA: Henry J. Kaiser Family Foundation, 3 pp.

Center for Health and Gender Equity, Elizabeth Glaser Pediatric AIDS Foundation, Family Care International, Maternal Health Task Force, Women Deliver, White Ribbon Alliance. 2014. Maternal health and respectful maternity care. Washington, DC: Center for Health and Gender Equity, 2 pp.

Gavin L, Moskosky S, Carter M, Curtis K, Glass E, Godfrey E, Marcell A, Mautone-Smith N, Pazol K, Tepper N, Zapata L. 2014. Providing quality family planning services: Recommendations of CDC and the U.S. Office of Population Affairs. Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report Recommendations and Reports 63(4):1-54,

Pickett OK, DeFrancis Sun B. 2014. Assisted reproductive technologies (ART) and families: Resource brief (upd. ed.). Washington, DC: National Center for Education in Maternal and Child Health, multiple items.

Annotation: This brief is a guide to resources that focus on the psychological and social impacts of assisted reproductive technologies (ART) on children conceived via ART and on their families. The brief lists resources related to ethical and legal issues associated with ART. For the most part, the listed resources are available electronically at no charge. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Center for Education in Maternal and Child Health, Georgetown University, Box 571272, Washington, DC 20057-1272, Telephone: (202) 784-9770 E-mail: mchgroup@georgetown.edu Web Site: https://www.ncemch.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Biotechnology, Ethics, Legal issues, Reproductive health, Resources for professionals

United Nations Population Fund, International Confederation of Midwives, World Health Organization. 2014. The state of the world's midwifery: A universal pathway–A woman's right to health. New York, NY: United Nations Population Fund, 218 pp.

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Office for State, Tribal, Local, and Territorial Support. 2014. Bronx Teens Connections' Clinic Linkage Model: Connecting young people with clinical sexual and reproductive health services. Atlanta, GA: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Office for State, Tribal, Local, and Territorial Support, 2 pp. (Public health practice stories from the field)

Annotation: This document describes the Bronx Teens Connection (BxTC) program of the New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene, a multicomponent initiative to reduce pregnancy rates among adolescent and young adult females ages 15-19. Contents include information on program activities, accomplishments, and lessons learned. Topics include establishing formal linkages between clinics and schools or youth-serving organizations, connecting youth to high-quality clinical sexual health services.

Contact: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Office for State, Tribal, Local, and Territorial Support, 4770 Buford Highway, N.E., Mailstop E-70, Atlanta, GA 30341, E-mail: cdcinfo@cdc.gov Web Site: http://www.cdc.gov/stltpublichealth Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent pregnancy, Clinics, Health services delivery, Local MCH programs, Model programs, Prevention programs, Reproductive health, School linked programs, Sexual health, Urban population

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This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number U02MC31613, MCH Advanced Education Policy, $3.5 M. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.