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Strengthening the evidence for maternal and child health programs

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Items in this list may be obtained from the sources cited. Contact information reflects the most current data about the source that has been provided to the MCH Digital Library.


Displaying records 1 through 20 (32 total).

Golden J. 2018. Babies made us modern: How infants brought America into the twentieth century. New York, NY: Cambridge University Press,

Annotation: This book examines how babies shaped American society and culture and led their families into the modern world to become more accepting of scientific medicine, active consumers, open to new theories of human psychological development, and welcoming of government advice and programs. The book also examines the influence of cultural traditions and religious practices upon the diversity of infant lives, exploring the ways class, race, region, gender, and community shaped life in the nursery and household.

Contact: Cambridge University Press, 32 Avenue of the Americas, New York, NY 10013-2473, Telephone: 212-924-3900 Secondary Telephone: (914) 937-9600 Fax: 212-691-3239 E-mail: information@cup.org Web Site: http://www.cambridge.org/us/

Keywords: Community role, Cultural beliefs, Infants, Regional factors, Religion, Social change, Social factors, Sociocultural factors

Terzian MA, Moore KA, Constance N. 2014. Transitioning to adulthood: The role of supportive relationships and regular religious involvement. Bethesda, MD: Child Trends, 10 pp. (Research brief)

Annotation: This research brief presents findings from a study to assess the long-term implications of supportive relationships and religious involvement, by assessing whether young adults who reported having positive relationships with their parents, teachers, or friends or who reported weekly religious involvement when they were adolescents were more likely to later have lower-risk transitions to adulthood relative to young adults who had not reported these positive social connections as adolescents, even taking sociodemographic background and negative childhood experiences into account. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: Child Trends, 7315 Wisconsin Avenue, Suite 1200 W, Bethesda, MD 20814, Telephone: (240) 223-9200 E-mail: Web Site: http://www.childtrends.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescents, Longitudinal studies, Relationships, Religion, Research, Risk factors, Social factors, Transitions, Young adults, Youth development

Arzola F, Diaz HL, Durante Y, Escobar D, Humphreys M, with Marrero, Jr. E, Zareth A, eds. 2013. Countering the silence: A faith leader's toolkit for preventing teen pregnancy. Philadelphia, PA: Esperanza; Washington, DC: National Campaign to Prevent Teen and Unplanned Pregnancy, 59 pp.

Annotation: This toolkit includes data and research, as well as Bible studies and suggested activities and ideas on how faith leaders can openly discuss topics such as sex, dating, and relationships with teens and parents from a religious perspective. Available in both English and Spanish, the toolkit includes action steps for faith leaders, a video for youth leaders and senior pastors, assessment tools, and recommended sermon topics for pastors and youth leaders.

Contact: National Campaign to Prevent Teen and Unplanned Pregnancy = Power to Decide, 1776 Massachusetts Avenue, N.W., Suite 200, Washington, DC 20036, Telephone: (202) 478-8500 Fax: (202) 478-8588 E-mail: campaign@teenpregnancy.org Web Site: http://www.thenationalcampaign.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent pregnancy, Prevention services, Religion, Sexuality education, Unplanned pregnancy

Shaefer SJM, Buckley K, eds. 2012. Voices from the community: Cross cultural expressions of grief at the loss of an infant. Washington, DC: American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists, National Fetal Infant Morality Review Program, 74 pp.

Annotation: This document summarizes a series of panel discussions conducted by the Association of SIDS and Infant Mortality Programs at four National Fetal-Infant Mortality Review Program annual conferences in 1998, 2001, 2004, and 2007. The content is drawn from the panelists' personal experiences with and professional expertise in the cultural traditions that may affect a family's expression of grief and loss. Topics include history and culture, general bereavement customs, service delivery issues, recommendations for practice, and implications for providers. Cultures and religions described include African American, specific tribes of American Indians, Hispanic/Latino, Chinese, Hmong, Iranian, Jewish, Muslim, and deaf and hard-of-hearing, [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Fetal-Infant Mortality Review Program, American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists, 409 12th Street, S.W.***DEFUNCT***, Washington, DC 20024, Telephone: (202) 863-2587 E-mail: nfimr@acog.org Web Site: http://www.nfimr.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Cultural factors, Culturally competent services, Ethnic groups, Grief, Infant death, Perinatal bereavement, Religion, Service delivery

Kosciw JG. 2010. The 2009 national school climate survey: The school-related experiences of our nation's lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender youth. New York, NY: Gay, Lesbian and Straight Education Network, 139 pp.

Annotation: This report describes the National School Climate Survey conducted by the Gay, Lesbian and Straight Education Network. The survey asked lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) youth about biased language in their schools; feelings of comfort and safety in school; and experiences of verbal, physical, and sexual harassment based on sexual orientation, gender, gender expression, race/ethnicity, disability, and religion. The report, which includes an executive summary, also contains a description of the study's methodology, results, and a conclusion. Extensive statistical information is presented in figures and tables throughout the report.

Contact: Gay, Lesbian and Straight Education Network, 90 Broad Street, Second Floor, New York, NY 10004, Telephone: (212) 727-0135 Fax: (212) 727-0254 E-mail: glsen@glsen.org Web Site: http://www.glsen.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent sexuality, Adolescents, Ethnic factors, Gender discrimination, Homosexuality, Language, Racial factors, Religion, Safety, Schools, Sexual harassment, Surveys

Guttmacher Institute. 2010. Emergency contraception. New York, NY: Guttmacher Institute, 3 pp. (State policies in brief)

Annotation: This fact sheet provides information about state policies on providing emergency contraception. The fact sheet offers background on the topic and also includes highlights of how state policies on providing emergency-contraception-related services differ.

Contact: Guttmacher Institute, 125 Maiden Lane, New York, NY 10038, Telephone: (212) 248-1111 Secondary Telephone: (800) 355-0244 Fax: (212) 248-1951; Washington, D.C. Office (202) 223-5756 E-mail: guttmacher@guttmacher.org Web Site: http://www.guttmacher.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Access to health care, Emergency contraception, Moral values, Pregnancy, Religion, State legislation

Guttmacher Institute. 2010. Insurance coverage of contraceptives. New York, NY: Guttmacher Institute, 3 pp. (State policies in brief)

Annotation: This fact sheet provides information about state policies on insurance coverage of contraceptives. The fact sheet offers background on the topic, particularly as these policies relate to whether employers or insurers can refuse to cover contraceptives on religious or moral grounds. The fact sheet also includes highlights of how states differ in terms of their contraceptive insurance coverage policies.

Contact: Guttmacher Institute, 125 Maiden Lane, New York, NY 10038, Telephone: (212) 248-1111 Secondary Telephone: (800) 355-0244 Fax: (212) 248-1951; Washington, D.C. Office (202) 223-5756 E-mail: guttmacher@guttmacher.org Web Site: http://www.guttmacher.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Contraception, Ethics, Insurance, Moral values, Religion, State legislation

Guttmacher Institute. 2010. Refusing to provide health services. New York, NY: Guttmacher Institute, 3 pp. (State policies in brief)

Annotation: This fact sheet provides information about state policies on refusing to provide health services. The fact sheet offers background on policies allowing health professionals, institutions, and pharmacies or pharmacists to refuse to provide health services (particularly abortion, contraception, or sterilization services) owing to religious or moral objections. The fact sheet also includes highlights of how state policies on providing health services differ.

Contact: Guttmacher Institute, 125 Maiden Lane, New York, NY 10038, Telephone: (212) 248-1111 Secondary Telephone: (800) 355-0244 Fax: (212) 248-1951; Washington, D.C. Office (202) 223-5756 E-mail: guttmacher@guttmacher.org Web Site: http://www.guttmacher.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Abortion, Access to health care, Contraception, Moral values, Religion, State legislation, Sterilization

National Health Law Program. 2010. Health care refusals: Undermining quality care for women. Los Angeles, CA: National Health Law Program, 80 pp.

Annotation: This report addresses health care refusals and denials for care to women that are rooted in political ideology or institutional or personal religious objections and evaluations their potential impact access to care. The report provides background and analysis of the ethical and legal concepts of standards of care and informed consent and then analyzes religious, ideological, and political restrictions and denials of care that conflict with and undermine established medical standards. The report also provides detailed descriptions and analysis of the standards of care that govern medical practice for a range of common health conditions and illustrates how refusals and denials of care violate those standards and put women's health at risk. Topics include standards of care, pregnancy prevention, abortion, pregnancy attainment, and healthy sexuality.

Contact: National Health Law Program, 3701 Wilshire Boulevard, Suite 750, Los Angeles, CA 90010, Telephone: (310) 204-6010 Fax: (213) 386-0774 E-mail: nhelp@healthlaw.org Web Site: http://www.healthlaw.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Abortion, Access to health care, Ethics, Informed consent, Legal issues, Pregnancy, Prevention, Religion, Reproductive health, Sexuality, Standards, Women's health

Vexler EJ. 2007. Voices heard: Latino adults and teens speak up about teen pregnancy: A national survey of Latinos. Washington, DC: National Campaign to Prevent Teen Pregnancy, 28 pp.

Annotation: This report focuses on enhancing the nation's understanding of the adolescent pregnancy problem in the Latino community and what to do about it. Section topics include highlights from parents and adolescents on abstinence and contraception; regret, virginity, and older partners; gender differences, religion, social norms and beliefs; and the media. The report is also available in Spanish.

Contact: National Campaign to Prevent Teen and Unplanned Pregnancy = Power to Decide, 1776 Massachusetts Avenue, N.W., Suite 200, Washington, DC 20036, Telephone: (202) 478-8500 Fax: (202) 478-8588 E-mail: campaign@teenpregnancy.org Web Site: http://www.thenationalcampaign.org Available from the website. Document Number: ISBN 1-58671-067-2.

Keywords: Abstinence, Adolescent pregnancy, Adolescent sexuality, Adolescents, Contraception, Hispanic Americans, Parents, Peer pressure, Religion, Spanish language materials, Surveys

Shaefer J. 2007. When an infant dies: Cross cultural expressions of grief and loss III. Washington, DC: American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists; [Lansing, MI]: Association of SIDS and Infant Mortality Programs, 20 pp. (Bulletin [no. 3])

Annotation: This bulletin summarizes a panel presentation from the National Fetal and Infant Mortality Review Program's Fifth National Conference, held August 12-14, 2004 in Washington, DC. It explores the cultural traditions of Hmong, African American, and Jewish families grieving the loss of a pregnancy or infant. It is the third in a series focused on cross-cultural grief and loss and provides an updated review of the literature. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Fetal-Infant Mortality Review Program, American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists, 409 12th Street, S.W.***DEFUNCT***, Washington, DC 20024, Telephone: (202) 863-2587 E-mail: nfimr@acog.org Web Site: http://www.nfimr.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Bereavement, Blacks, Child death, Cultural factors, Death attitudes, Ethnic factors, Ethnic groups, Fetal death, Grief, Infant death, Neonatal death, Perinatal bereavement, Pregnancy loss, Religion

Kempner ME. 2006. Toward a sexually healthy America: Abstinence-only-until-marriage programs that try to keep our youth "scared chaste". New York, NY: Sexuality Information and Education Council of the United States, 70 pp.

Annotation: This report is based on a review conducted by the Sexuality Information and Education Council of the United States of nine of the most widely available abstinence-only-until-marriage curricula designed for junior and senior high school students that emphasize the negative consequences of premarital sexual activity, portray sexual behavior as universally dangerous, and deny young people information about pregnancy and disease prevention. The report discusses the educational philosophy of these curricula and their scope and context. Topics covered include sexuality and abstinence, religion and morality, fear and shame, sexual pressure, sexual arousal, sexually transmitted diseases, HIV and AIDS, condoms and contraception, marriage and family structure, gender, sexual orientation, pregnancy options and abortion, teaching methods, curricula strong point, and the future of sexuality education. Brief reviews of the curricula are provided. A list of abstinence-education curricula that do not include messages of fear or shame is included. The report includes references.

Contact: Sexuality Information and Education Council of the United States, 90 John Street Suite 402, New York, NY 10038, Telephone: (212) 819-9770 Fax: (212) 819-9776 E-mail: siecus@siecus.org Web Site: http://www.siecus.org Available from the website.

Keywords: AIDS, Abortion, Abstinence, Adolescent sexuality, Condoms, Contraception, Curricula, Families, HIV, Marriage, Moral values, Pregnancy, Prevention, Religion, Sexual identity, Sexuality education, Sexually transmitted diseases

Nimer M. 2005. A health care providers guide to Islamic religious practices. Washington, DC: Council on American-Islamic Relations, 19 pp. (CAIR guides to Islamic religious practices)

Annotation: This guide provides information to assist health professionals in formulating and implementing policies and procedures aimed at the delivery of more culturally competent care for Muslims. It also serves as a guide for the accommodation of religiously mandated practices of Muslim clients. Topics include Muslim view of illness and treatment, U.S. legal protections of religious freedom, daily prayer, washing, prayer space, Friday congregational prayer, fasting, Muslim holidays, dietary requirements, clothing, touching, birth and circumcision, death, on call chaplains, autopsy, assisted suicide and euthanasia, and abortion and stillborns. Information on medical procedures and a glossary of Muslim terms are also included.

Contact: Council on American-Islamic Relations, 453 New Jersey Avenue, S.E., Washington, DC 20003, Telephone: (202) 488-8787 Fax: (202) 488-0833 Web Site: http://www.cair.com/Home.aspx $2.00 plus postage and handling; also available from the website.

Keywords: Culturally competent services, Health attitudes, Health behavior, Health care delivery, Muslims, Religion

Shah MA, ed. 2004. Transcultural aspects of perinatal health care: A resource guide. [2nd ed.]. Tampa, FL: National Perinatal Association, 313 pp.

Annotation: This resource guide, written for health practitioners, public health departments, academic centers, and libraries, contains information about women's perinatal health care issues of various cultures including African American, Amish (Old Order), Cambodian, Chinese, Cuban, Hmong, Jamaican, Japanese, Jewish, Korean, Mexican, Mormon, Native American, Pakistani, and Seventh-Day Adventist. Each section contains information and history about the culture, health and illness, pregnancy and prenatal care, labor and delivery, postpartum and newborn care, family planning, death and burial rites, and perinatal health care issues highlighted for each of these topics, and references. Charts offered in the preface provide statistical data on infant mortality and recommended standards. The guide concludes with an index.

Contact: American Academy of Pediatrics, 345 Park Boulevard, Itasca, IL 60143, Telephone: (630) 626-6000 Secondary Telephone: (847) 434-4000 Fax: (847) 434-8000 Web Site: https://www.aap.org Available in libraries. Document Number: ISBN 0-58110-097-3.

Keywords: Childbirth, Cultural diversity, Cultural factors, Ethnic factors, Family planning, Infant death, Labor, Perinatal care, Perinatal health, Postpartum care, Pregnancy, Religion

National Institute of Child Health and Human Development and National Black Child Development Institute. 2003. An activity book for African American families: Helping children cope with crisis. Rockville, MD: National Institute of Child Health and Human Development; Washington, DC: National Black Child Development Institute, 90 pp.

Annotation: The activities in this book are designed to help black parents talk with their children about emotions, thoughts, and feelings that may be difficult to discuss so that families can begin dealing with feelings in positive, constructive ways. The book is divided into the following sections: (1) inspire hope in your child, (2) be still and listen to your child, (3) support, comfort, and love your child, (4) give your child information that is age-appropriate, (5) help your child feel safe, (6) making a plan with your child for emergencies, (7) help your child feel good about himself, (8) pay attention to what your child watches on TV, (9) share your faith with your child, and (10) just for parents. Each section provides an explanation of the goals of the activities within the section, an affirmation drawn from African and African American proverbs, and several activities. The book contains color photographs and illustrations.

Contact: Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, P.O. Box 3006, Rockville, MD 20847, Telephone: (800) 370-2943 Secondary Telephone: (888) 320-6942 Fax: (866) 760-5947 Web Site: https://www.nichd.nih.gov/Pages/index.aspx Available from the website. Document Number: NIH Pub. No. 03-5362B.

Keywords: Blacks, Child safety, Children, Communication, Coping, Cultural sensitivity, Emergencies, Emotional development, Emotions, Family life education, Materials for children, Parent child relations, Parent education, Parenting, Religion, Self esteem, Television

Bridges LJ, Moore KA. 2002. Religious involvement and children's well-being: What research tells us (and what it doesn't). Washington, DC: Child Trends, 8 pp. (Research brief)

Annotation: This research brief summarizes findings from recent studies that examine linkages between adolescents' beliefs and practices of religions (i.e., "religiosity") and their well-being. The brief also touches on parents' religious practices and beliefs in relation to their adolescents' well-being. The report provides a snapshot of respondents' religious practices and beliefs and their connection to topics such as general delinquency, drug and alcohol use and abuse, adolescent sexual activity, socially beneficial behavior and moral values, and personality and mental health. Additional topics include parental influences, research concerns, conclusions, and implications for policy and practice. Endnotes are provided.

Contact: Child Trends, 7315 Wisconsin Avenue, Suite 1200 W, Bethesda, MD 20814, Telephone: (240) 223-9200 E-mail: Web Site: http://www.childtrends.org Available at no charge; also available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent behavior, Psychosocial development, Religion, Research reviews, Risk taking, Sexual behavior, Substance abuse

Boehnlein JK, ed. 2000. Psychiatry and religion: The convergence of mind and spirit. Washington, DC: American Psychiatric Press, 196 pp.

Annotation: This book, written for psychiatric educators and practitioners, centers on the proposition that psychiatry and religion are parallel and complimentary frames of reference for understanding and describing the human experience and human behavior. The book is divided into three sections: general theoretical principles and historical trends; pragmatic treatment issues at the interface of religion and psychiatry; and consideration of issues that will affect the future relationship between psychiatry and religion. Each chapter is independently authored and contains a summary or conclusion and references. The book concludes with an index.

Contact: American Psychiatric Publishing, 1000 Wilson Boulevard, Suite 1825, Arlington, VA 22209, Telephone: 703-907-7322 Secondary Telephone: 800-368-5777 Fax: 703-907-1091 E-mail: appi@psych.org Web Site: http://www.appi.org Available in libraries. Document Number: ISBN 0-88048-920-0.

Keywords: Behavior, Cultural factors, Interdisciplinary training, Mental health services, Psychiatry, Religion, Trends

Hammad A, Kysia R, Rabah R, Hassoun R, Connelly M. 1999. Guide to Arab culture: Health care delivery to the Arab American community. Dearborn, MI: Arab Community Center for Economic and Social Services Community Health Center, Health Research Unit, 30 pp. (Research report; no. 7)

Annotation: This report is part of the cultural competency material from the Annual Oral Health Conference 2000 held in Lansing, Michigan in June, 2000. It discusses Arab immigration to the United States and especially Michigan, health and healing in the Arab Middle East, understanding Islamic socio-religious behavior, and Arab cultural issues in health care.

Contact: Arab Community Center for Economic and Social Services Community Health Center, Health Research Unit, 2651 Saulino Court , Dearborn, MI 48120, Telephone: (313) 842-7010 Fax: (313) 842-5150 Web Site: http://www.accesscommunity.org Price unknown.

Keywords: Arab Americans, Cultural beliefs, Cultural sensitivity, Culturally competent services, Ethnic groups, Health care delivery, Michigan, Middle East, Muslims, Religion

Kaiser Family Foundation. 1998. Kaiser Family Foundation and YM Magazine national survey of teens: Teens talk about dating, intimacy, and their sexual experiences. Menlo Park, CA: Henry J. Kaiser Family Foundation, 37 pp.

Annotation: This document reports the findings of a survey (650 boys and girls ages 13-18) that asked adolescents what kinds of sexual situations they face today, how they negotiate dating, sex, and intimacy, and what kind of information adolescents need. The report discusses dating and relationships, extent of sexual activity, how and why does the decision to have sex occur, choosing to be a virgin, sexuality and religion, differences in the way boys and girls attach importance to sex in a relationship, adolescents' feelings about being together, uncomfortable sexual situations, what adolescents will talk about, where adolescents get advice on talking about sex, whether parents know what is happening, adolescent concerns about pregnancy and sexually transmitted diseases, and whether adolescents protect themselves sexually. The methodology of the study is explained and the statistical results are provided.

Contact: Henry J. Kaiser Family Foundation, 2400 Sand Hill Road, Menlo Park, CA 94025, Telephone: (650) 854-9400 Secondary Telephone: (202) 347-5270 Contact Phone: (800) 656-4KFF Fax: (650) 854-4800 Web Site: http://www.kff.org

Keywords: Adolescent pregnancy, Adolescent sexuality, Communication, Dating, Parents, Religion, Research methodology, Sexually transmitted diseases, Statistics, Surveys

Daughterty D, Stanhope V, eds. 1998. Pathways to tolerance: Student diversity. Bethesda, MD: National Association of School Psychologists, 52 pp.

Annotation: This publication demonstrates how schools can meet the educational and psychological needs of America's increasingly diverse student population. Illustrative programs are described that value the uniqueness of each individual and recognize and respect student diversity as a strength. Articles include information that promote knowledge and understanding of the effects of culture, race, ethnicity, religion, gender, sexual orientation, disability, and language on students' learning and behavior. Overall, the articles provide approaches to promote a safe learning environment for children. The guide is intended for parents, educators, administrators, pupil services providers, and policy makers.

Contact: National Association of School Psychologists, 4340 East West Highway, Suite 402, Bethesda, MD 20814, Telephone: (301) 657-0270 Secondary Telephone: (866) 331-NASP Fax: (301) 657-0275 E-mail: sgorin@naspweb.org Web Site: http://www.nasponline.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Cultural diversity, Cultural sensitivity, Disabilities, Ethnic factors, Gender discrimination, Homosexuality, Racial factors, Religion, Students

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This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number U02MC31613, MCH Advanced Education Policy, $3.5 M. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.