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Strengthen the Evidence for Maternal and Child Health Programs

Search Results: MCHLine

Items in this list may be obtained from the sources cited. Contact information reflects the most current data about the source that has been provided to the MCH Digital Library.


Displaying records 1 through 20 (27 total).

National Maternal and Child Oral Health Resource Center. 2020. Networks for oral health integration: Overview and project profiles. Washington, DC: National Maternal and Child Oral Health Resource Center, 12 pp.

Annotation: This report provides information about the Networks for Oral Health Integration (NOHI) Within the Maternal and Child Health Safety Net projects. The goal of the initiative is to improve access to and utilization of comprehensive, high-quality oral health care in community health centers for pregnant women, infants and children from birth to age 40 months, and children ages 6–11 at high risk for oral disease. The report includes a profile of each of the three projects: Midwest Network for Oral Health Integration, Rocky Mountain Network, and Transforming Oral Health for Families. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Maternal and Child Oral Health Resource Center, Telephone: (202) 784-9771 E-mail: OHRCinfo@georgetown.edu Web Site: https://www.mchoralhealth.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Access to health care, Health care utilization, High risk groups, Oral health, Pregnant women, Regional programs, Service integration

Payne E, Garcia S, Minkovitz C, Grason H, Strobino D. 2017. Strengthen the evidence base for maternal and child health programs: NPM 3–Risk-appropriate perinatal care [NPM 3 brief]. Baltimore, MD: Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Women's and Children's Health Policy Center, 3 pp.

Annotation: This brief identifies evidence-informed strategies that state Title V programs may consider implementing to increase the percentage of very low birth weight (<1500 gm) infants born in hospitals with a level III or higher neonatal intensive care unit. Contents include information about the methods and results of the evidence review, key findings, and implications. The full review is also available. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Women's and Children's Health Policy Center, 615 North Wolfe Street, Room E4143, Baltimore, MD 21205, Telephone: (410) 502-5450 Fax: (410) 502-5831 Web Site: http://www.jhsph.edu/wchpc Available from the website.

Keywords: Block grants, Childbirth, Evidence-based practice, High risk pregnancy, Hospitals, Infant mortality, Intervention, Literature reviews, Low birthweight, Measures, Model programs, Neonatal intensive care units, Newborn infants, Perinatal care, Policy development, Program planning, Protective factors, Regional medical centers, Regional planning, Resources for professionals, State MCH programs, Systems development, Title V programs

U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Children's Health Protection. 2015. Healthy schools, healthy kids. Washington, DC: U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Children's Health Protection, multiple items.

Annotation: These resources are designed to help individuals and families, states, and communities establish, maintain, or enhance a school environmental health program. Topics include how school environments can impact child performance and health, opting for environmentally-friendly transportation, assessing and improving air and water quality, reducing chemical exposures, and improving the performance of school buildings. Contents include information on student curricula; national programs; and regional, tribal, state, and local resources for engaging communities in activities to improve children's health and safety. Additional contents include law, regulation, and policy resources; guidelines; and a software tool for conducting assessments, and tracking and managing health issues.

Contact: U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Children's Health Protection, Room 2512 Ariel Rios North, 1200 Pennsylvania Avenue, N.W., Mail Code 1107-T, Washington, DC 20004, Telephone: (202) 564-2188 Fax: (202) 564-2733 Web Site: http://www2.epa.gov/children Available from the website.

Keywords: Community participation, Consumer education materials, Curricula, Environmental health, Model programs, Multimedia, Regional planning, Resources for professionals, School age children, School health, School health programs, Students

Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Women's and Children's Health Policy Center. 2015. Strengthen the evidence for MCH programs: Environmental scan of strategies National Performance Measure (NPM) #3: Perinatal regionalization. Baltimore, MD: Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Women's and Children's Health Policy Center, 6 pp.

Annotation: This environmental scan identifies collections of strategies to advance performance for NPM #3: Perinatal Regionalization--percent of very low birth weight (VLBW) infants born in a hospital with a Level III+ neonatal intensive care unit (NICU). It includes a list of reviews and compilations on the topic; frameworks and landmark initiatives; databases and related search terms; and inclusion and exclusion criteria. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Women's and Children's Health Policy Center, 615 North Wolfe Street, Room E4143, Baltimore, MD 21205, Telephone: (410) 502-5450 Fax: (410) 502-5831 Web Site: http://www.jhsph.edu/wchpc Available from the website.

Keywords: Block grants, Evidence-based practice, Hospitals, Literature reviews, Low birthweight infants, Measures, Model programs, Neonatal intensive care units, Perinatal care, Policy development, Program planning, Regional planning, Resources for professionals, State MCH programs, Title V programs

From the First Tooth. 2014–. From the First Tooth. [Portland, ME]: From the First Tooth, multiple items.

Annotation: This initiative provides resources that can help prenatal care health professionals, primary care health professionals, and oral health professionals improve infants’ and young children’s oral health by integrating preventive oral health care into primary care well-child visits. The initiative is located in New England (Connecticut, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, Maine, Rhode Island, and Vermont). Information for parents and other caregivers about promoting oral health and obtaining oral health care is also included, along with information for community organizations.

Contact: From the First Tooth / Before the First Tooth, c/o MaineHealth, 110 Free Street, Portland, ME 04101, Telephone: (207) 662-6296 E-mail: info@fromthefirsttooth.org Web Site: http://www.fromthefirsttooth.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Collaboration, Community based services, Dental care, Dental caries, Disease prevention, Fluorides, Health promotion, Infants, New England, Oral health, Pediatric care, Preventive health services, Primary care, Public private partnerships, Regional programs, Reimbursement, Risk assessment, Service integration, State initiatives, Training, Young children

McCoy C. 2014. State Title V program approaches to improving birth outcomes. Washington, DC: Association of Maternal and Child Health Programs, 24 pp.

Annotation: This issue brief focuses on efforts to reduce non-medically indicated deliveries before 39 weeks gestation and methods that state Title V maternal and child health (MCH) programs are using to improve birth outcomes. Topics include national and state initiatives to make lowering the number of non-medically indicated deliveries before 39 weeks a priority; the role of state Title V MCH programs in implementing quality improvement programs and payment reforms; and examples from California, North Carolina, and Texas. The appendix contains a matrix of national and regional initiatives to improve birth outcomes including a description, geographic scope, funding, and partners for each initiative.

Contact: Association of Maternal and Child Health Programs, 1825 K Street, N.W., Suite 250, Washington, DC 20006-1202, Telephone: (202) 775-0436 Fax: (202) 478-5120 E-mail: info@amchp.org Web Site: http://www.amchp.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Childbirth, National initiatives, Prematurity, Program improvement, Quality assurance, Regional programs, Reimbursement, State MCH programs, Treatment outcome

Emergency Medical Services for Children (EMSC) National Resource Center. 2014. Pediatric regionalization of care primer. Silver Spring, MD: Emergency Medical Services for Children (EMSC) National Resource Center, 40 pp.

Annotation: This primer describes a structured system of care to ensure that all seriously ill and injured children receive the care they need, regardless of the local availability of health care resources. Topics include its evolution, components, and models, as well as unique considerations for systems development. Contents include general information about regionalization and pediatric specialty care; hospital regulations, mandates, and standards; and a summary, footnotes, and glossary. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: Emergency Medical Services for Children (EMSC) National Resource Center, 801 Roeder Road, Suite 600, Silver Spring, MD 20910, Telephone: (301) 244-6300 Fax: (301) 244-6301 E-mail: emscinformation@childrensnational.org Web Site: http://www.emscnrc.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Emergency medical services for children, Health care systems, Regional planning, Regional programs, Systems development

Toldson IA, Manekin SD. 2014. Building bridges: Connecting out-of-school time to classroom success among school-age Black males in the District of Columbia. Washington, DC: D.C. Children and Youth Investment Trust Corporation, 74 pp.

Lee V. 2014. Collaborative Improvement and Innovation Network (CoIIN) To Reduce Infant Mortality: Update on regions IV, V and VI. Rockville, MD: U.S. Maternal and Child Health Bureau, 16 pp.

Annotation: This set of slides describes the Collaborative Improvement & Innovation Network (CoIIN) to Reduce Infant Mortality, including its aims, strategies, and measures, including reducing early elective delivery and smoking rates among pregnant women, increasing safe sleep practices and mothers delivering infants at the appropriate level of care, and changing Medicaid policies to increase the number of women who receive interconception care. It provides data showing trends from 2011 to 2013 and other accomplishments and the secrets of its success. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: Secretary's Advisory Committee on Infant Mortality, U.S. Maternal and Child Health Bureau, Parklawn Building, 5600 Fishers Lane, Rockville, MD 20857, Web Site: http://www.hrsa.gov/advisorycommittees/mchbadvisory/InfantMortality/index.html Available from the website.

Keywords: Childbirth, Infant mortality, Perinatal care, Preconception care, Prevention programs, Regional programs, Smoking, Women's health

Safe Kids Upstate. (2013). The Upstate Cribs for Kids Program. Greenville, SC: Safe Kids Upstate,

Annotation: This website describes Upstate Cribs for Kids -- a regional program in South Carolina that aims to reduce the number of infant deaths due to unsafe sleeping environments. The site provides safe sleep education and materials to help families and caregivers avoid putting their children at risk due to unsafe sleep practices. Also included is a link to the online safe sleep video, Room to Breathe.

Contact: Safe Kids Upstate, 255 Enterprise Boulevard, Suite 110, Greenville, SC Telephone: (864) 454-1100 E-mail: cfryer@ghs.org Web Site: http://www.safekidsupstate.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Infant death, Prevention, Regional programs, Risk factors, SIDS, Sleep position, South Carolina, State programs

Kirkendall N, House C, Citro C, Committee on National Statistics, Food and Nutrition Board. 2013. Research opportunities concerning the causes and consequences of child food insecurity and hunger: Workshop summary. Washington, DC: National Academies Press, 194 pp.

Annotation: This report reviews the adequacy of current knowledge, identifies substantial research gaps, and considers data availability of economic, health, social, cultural, demographic, and other factors that contribute to childhood hunger or food insecurity. It also considers the geographic distribution of childhood hunger and food insecurity; the extent to which existing federal assistance programs reduce childhood hunger and food insecurity; childhood hunger and food insecurity persistence, and the extent to which it is due to gaps in program coverage; and the inability of potential participants to access programs, or the insufficiency of program benefits or services.

Contact: National Academies Press, 500 Fifth Street, N.W., Keck 360, Washington, DC 20001, Telephone: (202) 334-3313 Secondary Telephone: (888) 624-8373 Fax: (202) 334-2451 E-mail: customer_service@nap.edu Web Site: http://www.nap.edu Available from the website. Document Number: ISBN 978-309-29284-9.

Keywords: Barriers, Children, Economic factors, Federal programs, Food consumption, Geographic factors, Hunger, Regional factors, Statistical data

Murphey D, Redd Z, Moodie S, Knewstub D, Humble J, Bell K, Cooper M. 2012. Assessing the status and needs of children and youth in the national capital region (rev. ed.). Washington, DC: Child Trends, 165 pp.

Annotation: This report presents a comprehensive, baseline assessment of the status of children, adolescents, and young adults (from birth to age 24) in the National Capital Region (NCR), which includes the District of Columbia, two independent cities and four counties in Virginia, and two counties in Maryland, The report is organized in the following indicator sections: demographic characteristics; pregnancy and birth outcomes; infant, child, and adolescent health and safety; economic well-being; child welfare; and education. For each indicator, the report cites differences evident among the various jurisdictions of the NCR, as well as notable disparities along lines of gender, race and Hispanic origin, or age. The evidence on what works to improve conditions for youth is also summarized for many of the indicators. The report concludes with a summary of knowledge gaps and comments about interpretation.

Contact: Child Trends, 7315 Wisconsin Avenue, Suite 1200 W, Bethesda, MD 20814, Telephone: (240) 223-9200 E-mail: Web Site: http://www.childtrends.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescents, Children, Cities, County programs, District of Columbia, Health planning, Health status, Maryland, Needs assessment, Regional planning, Statistical data, Virginia

First Focus. 2012. Big ideas: Children in the Southwest. Washington, DC: First Focus, 176 pp.

Annotation: This compilation of 12 papers examines the distinct needs of children in the southwestern United States (Arizona, California, Colorado, Nevada, New Mexico) and provides ideas for meeting those needs. Topics include changing demographics; inclusive, culturally relevant, and family-focused policy solutions; successful programs; and establishing common-ground for addressing challenges facing children in the Southwest.

Contact: First Focus, 1400 Eye Street, N.W., Suite 650, Washington, DC 20005, Telephone: (202) 657-0670 Fax: (202) 657-0671 Web Site: http://www.firstfocus.net Available from the website.

Keywords: Children, Culturally competent services, Family centered care, Language, Model programs, Policy development, Regional factors, Sociocultural factors, Trends

Highmark Foundation. 2010. Working together: Improving access to oral health and dental care for underserved populations. Pittsburgh, PA: Highmark Foundation, 13 pp.

Annotation: This report describes an initiative to reduce oral health burdens among individuals in Pennsylvania who cannot afford dentists or who are unable to find oral health professionals who will treat them and their families. Contents include stories from community-based grantees who were awarded foundation funding to (1) improve coordination and build capacity, (2) address a regional strategy to support expansion of oral health services, or (3) expand or improve existing dental equipment. The report presents an analysis of the impact the grants have had to date using three metrics: access to care, quality of care, and financial sustainability. Implications for future improvements in the oral health of underserved populations in Pennsylvania are also addressed.

Contact: Highmark Foundation, Fifth Avenue Place, 120 Fifth Avenue, Pittsburgh, PA 15222-3099, Telephone: (800) 789-1726 Fax: (412) 544-6120 E-mail: info@highmarkfoundation.org Web Site: http://www.highmark.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Children, Collaboration, Dental care, Diffusion of innovation, Financing, Foundations, Model programs, Oral health, Pennsylvania, Public health, Regional planning, State initiatives

Steffensen J. 2003. Migrant and Seasonal Head Start Region XII Oral Health Forum: Enhancing Partnerships for Migrant and Seasonal Head Start and Oral Health. Washington, DC: Health Systems Research, 24 pp.

Annotation: This report describes the activities of the region XII oral health forum held on February 6, 2003, in Washington, DC. The purpose of the forum was to determine how organizations and agencies could work together at the regional level to improve the oral health of children enrolled in migrant and seasonal Head Start (MSHS) programs. Topics include assessing and prioritizing oral health issues and challenges faced by MSHS programs, identifying promising practices, and developing strategies for regional action to enhance the oral health component of MSHS programs. Additional discussion is included on enhancing prevention, expanding effective education and collaboration between organizations and agencies, and increasing access to care. [Funded in part by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Maternal and Child Oral Health Resource Center, Telephone: (202) 784-9771 E-mail: OHRCinfo@georgetown.edu Web Site: https://www.mchoralhealth.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Access to health care, Conferences, Dental care, Dental education, Head Start, Migrant health, Oral health, Regional programs, Young children

Billings J, Weinick RM. 2003. Monitoring the health care safety net. Rockville, MD: U.S. Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, 3 v., 1 CD-ROM.

Annotation: This three-volume set provides information that can help policymakers understand the status of their local and regional safety nets by providing measures and comparisons with other communities for a wide variety of characteristics of the safety net. Volume 1 presents data from 30 states and the District of Columbia. The data in this book describe the health care safety net in the places where 75 percent of the total American population lives and where 80 percent of Americans with family incomes below the federal poverty line live. Volume 2 presents data for 1, 818 states and counties. The data and analyses in this volume attempt to link the characteristics of the safety net to its outcomes on a widespread basis. Volume 3 offers strategies and concrete tools for assessing local health care safety nets.

Contact: U.S. Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, 5600 Fishers Lane, Rockville, MD 20857, Telephone: (301) 427-1104 Secondary Telephone: (301) 427-1364 Web Site: http://www.ahrq.gov Available in libraries.

Keywords: County programs, Data, Families, Health care delivery, Health services, Low income groups, Measures, Poverty, Regional programs, State programs, Urban areas

William M. Mercer. 2001. Geographic managed care dental program evaluation: Executive summary. Oakland, CA: Medi-Cal Policy Institute, 24 pp.

Annotation: This executive summary reports on a comprehensive, independent analysis of the California State Department of Health Services Geographic Managed Care dental program in Sacramento County, California, by using the Fresno County services of the statewide Denti-Cal program as a benchmark. The following topics are evaluated: (1) access to dental care, (2) quality of dental care, (3) relative value of services, (4) data collected, and (5) program monitoring. The report includes sections on methodology, a brief summary of findings, detailed findings, and recommendations.

Keywords: California, Children, Dental care, Families , Managed care, Oral health, Program evaluation, Regional programs

Green M,Palfrey JS, eds. 2001. Bright Futures: Guidelines for health supervision of infants, children, and adolescents (2nd ed.) (Rev.). Arlington, VA: National Center for Education in Maternal and Child Health, 338 pp.

Annotation: These Bright Futures guidelines provide health professionals and families with practical information, effective preventive techniques, and health promotion materials. They are designed to be adapted to meet regional priorities, take advantage of community resources, and help health professionals organize their practices to meet their patient needs. The guidelines begin with a brief description of the Bright Futures program and an introduction to health supervision. Individual chapters focus on infancy, early childhood, middle childhood, and adolescence. Each chapter covers age-specific information about the preparation families can do before a health visit, strengths and issues of the age group, and developmental charts. Appendices include (1) the Bright Futures periodicity schedule, (2) medical history, (3) recommended immunization schedule, (4) hearing screening, (5) vision screening, (6) iron-deficiency anemia screening, (7) screening for elevated blood lead levels, (8) hyperlipidemia screening, (9) hypertension screening, (10) tooth eruption chart, (11) sexual maturity ratings, (12) sexually transmitted disease prevention and screening, (13) safe, quality child care, (14) a bibliography, and (15) a list of participants in the first edition of these guidelines. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: Maternal and Child Health Library at Georgetown University, Telephone: (202) 784-9770 E-mail: mchgroup@georgetown.edu Web Site: https://www.mchlibrary.org Available for loan. Document Number: BF0902-001; ISBN 1-57285-070-1.

Keywords: Adolescent health, Adolescents, Bright Futures, Child health, Children, Community programs, Families, Guidelines, Health supervision, Infant health, Infants, Injury prevention, Patient care, Prevention services, Preventive health services, Psychosocial development, Regional factors

Green M, Palfrey JS, eds. 2000. Bright Futures: Guidelines for health supervision of infants, children, and adolescents (2nd ed.). Arlington, VA: National Center for Education in Maternal and Child Health, 338 pp., 1 CD-ROM.

Annotation: These Bright Futures guidelines provide health professionals and families with practical information, effective preventive techniques, and health promotion materials. They are designed to be adapted to meet regional priorities, take advantage of community resources, and help health professionals organize their practices to meet their patient needs. The guidelines begin with a brief description of the Bright Futures program and an introduction to health supervision. Individual chapters focus on infancy, early childhood, middle childhood, and adolescence. Each chapter covers age-specific information about the preparation families can do before a health visit, strengths and issues of the age group, and developmental charts. Appendices include (1) the Bright Futures periodicity schedule, (2) medical history, (3) recommended immunization schedule, (4) hearing screening, (5) vision screening, (6) iron-deficiency anemia screening, (7) screening for elevated blood lead levels, (8) hyperlipidemia screening, (9) hypertension screening, (10) tooth eruption chart, (11) sexual maturity ratings, (12) sexually transmitted disease prevention and screening, (13) safe, quality child care, (14) a bibliography, and (15) a list of participants in the first edition of these guidelines. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: Maternal and Child Health Library at Georgetown University, Telephone: (202) 784-9770 E-mail: mchgroup@georgetown.edu Web Site: https://www.mchlibrary.org Available for loan. Document Number: BF0902-001; ISBN 1-57285-058-2.

Keywords: Adolescent health, Adolescents, Bright Futures, CD-ROMs, Child health, Children, Community programs, Families, Guidelines, Health supervision, Infant health, Infants, Injury prevention, Patient care, Prevention services, Preventive health services, Psychosocial development, Regional factors

Huertas A Jr, Sullivan C. 1995. Safe schools within safe communities: A regional summit in the heartland. Oak Brook, IL: North Central Regional Educational Laboratory, 19 pp. (Policy briefs: Special report; October 1995)

Annotation: This report documents a seminar where information was shared about existing violence prevention policies, legislation, resources, success stories, and state initiatives. Those attending developed a long-range, coordinated state policy agenda and action plan for safe schools. The keynote speech, Minnesota's plan of action, selected community examples, and the summaries of the attending states' action planning session are included in this report.

Keywords: Budgeting, Budgets, Iowa, Juvenile delinquents, Juvenile justice, Michigan, Minnesota, Missouri, Nebraska, North Dakota, Ohio, Regional programs, School safety, South Dakota, Violence prevention

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This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number U02MC31613, MCH Advanced Education Policy, $3.5 M. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.