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Strengthen the Evidence for Maternal and Child Health Programs

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Items in this list may be obtained from the sources cited. Contact information reflects the most current data about the source that has been provided to the MCH Digital Library.


Displaying records 1 through 20 (21 total).

Association of Maternal and Child Health Programs and Family Voices. 2016. Stories of the newly enrolled: How new ACA coverage options are impacting women and families raising children with special health care needs. Washington, DC: Association of Maternal and Child Health Programs, 7 pp.

Annotation: This brief presents five case studies of women, young adults, and families, including those raising children and youth with special health care needs (CYSCHN), about enrolling in and receiving care through the Affordable Care Act (ACA) health insurance coverage. The contents illustrate some of the benefits of the ACA's new coverage options for women and families with CYSCHN and challenges that remain in closing gaps in care and ensuring appropriate coverage for vulnerable populations. Topics include ACA provider networks, autism treatment coverage; and coverage for Native Americans; immigrant and refugee women, and young adult women. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: Association of Maternal and Child Health Programs, 1825 K Street, N.W., Suite 250, Washington, DC 20006-1202, Telephone: (202) 775-0436 Fax: (202) 478-5120 E-mail: info@amchp.org Web Site: http://www.amchp.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Access to health care, American Indians, Case studies, Children with special health care needs, Family centered care, Financing, Health care reform, Health insurance, Immigrants, Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act, Program improvement, Refugees, Women, Young adults

Murphey D. 2016. Moving beyond trauma: Child migrants and refugees in the United States. Washington, DC: Child Trends, 22 pp.

Annotation: This report examines demographic data and other research findings to focus on common challenges among immigrant children. Contents key findings and background; definitions; information about refugees and those seeking asylum, undocumented children apprehended by Border Control, and children of unauthorized immigrants; threats to migrant children's well-being, including family instability, health, education, and economic security; public assistance available to international child migrants; and recommendations and resources.

Contact: Child Trends, 7315 Wisconsin Avenue, Suite 1200 W, Bethesda, MD 20814, Telephone: (240) 223-9200 E-mail: Web Site: http://www.childtrends.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Child development, Children, Immigration, Migrants, Public assistance, Refugees, Risk factors, Trauma

National Center on Cultural and Linguistic Responsiveness. 2015. Family well-being: Oral health tip sheet. [Washington, DC]: National Center on Cultural and Linguistic Responsiveness, 2 pp.

Annotation: This tip sheet for Head Start and child care staff provides tips on how to communicate with parents from various cultural backgrounds, especially parents who are refugees, about improving their child’s oral health. The tip sheet discusses cultural considerations to keep in mind when talking to families and lists important points about oral health to mention.

Contact: Early Childhood Learning and Knowledge Center, Telephone: (866) 763-6481 E-mail: health@ecetta.info Web Site: https://eclkc.ohs.acf.hhs.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Child care, Consumer education materials, Early Head Start, Early childhood education, Families, Head Start, Migrants, Non English language materials, Oral health, Refugees, Spanish language materials, Young children

Petty D. 2015. Eliminating tooth decay in the Karen refugee population. Plymouth, MN: Minnesota Oral Health Coalition, 1 video (40 min., 27 sec.).

Annotation: This video describes qualitative and quantitative research on oral health knowledge and behavior within the Karen refugee community in Minnesota, and how the results were used to target educational oral health topics to Karen leaders, parents, adolescents, and children. The video covers evidence-based oral health topics for the Karen refugee community and strategies for collaboration among oral health professionals, educators, and refugee community leaders.

Contact: Minnesota Oral Health Coalition, 4190 Vinewood Lane N, #111-416, Plymouth, MN 55442, Telephone: (763) 381-1701 E-mail: info@minnesotaoralhealthcoalition.org Web Site: http://www.minnesotaoralhealthcoalition.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Collaboration, Community based services, Health behavior, Health literacy, Local initiatives, Minnesota, Non English language materials, Oral health, Preventive health services, Public health education, Public private partnerships, Refugees, Research

U.S. Administration for Children and Families, Office of Refugee Resettlement. 2013. Somali refugee women: Learn about your health. Washington, DC: U.S. Administration for Children and Families, 4 videos.

Annotation: This four-part video series aims to provide information for current and former Somali refugee women about their bodies and health, so they can make the choices that are right for them. Topics include the reproductive system; infections, relationships, and cancer; pregnancy and birth; and other female health issues.

Contact: U.S. Administration for Children and Families, 370 L'Enfant Promenade, S.W., Washington, DC 20447, Telephone: (202) 401-9215 Secondary Telephone: (800) 422-4453 Web Site: http://www.acf.hhs.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Consumer education materials, Audiovisual materials, Health promotion, Minority health, Refugees, Reproductive health, Videos, Women's health

Louisville Metro Public Health and Wellness. [2012]. Healthy Tomorrows Somali Bantu Project final report. Louisville, KY: Louisville Metro Public Health and Wellness, 21 pp.

Annotation: This final report summarizes the Healthy Tomorrows Somali Bantu Project, which took place between March 2006 and February 2012 and was developed to increase access to culturally competent healthcare services, health prevention, and health education services and to provide a medical home for families of the Somali Bantu refugee population who have settled in Louisville, KY since the year 2000. The report describes the project goals and objectives; discusses program activities and evaluation measures; presents the results and final outcomes; and addresses futures plans and sustainability. A quick reference guide on the diet, religion, language, and culture of the Somali Bantu refugees is included. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: Maternal and Child Health Library at Georgetown University, Telephone: (202) 784-9770 Contact Phone: 502-574-6665 E-mail: mchgroup@georgetown.edu Contact E-mail: ginger.dereksen@louisvilleky.gov; ryan.irvine@louisvilleky.gov Web Site: https://www.mchlibrary.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Access to health care, Cultural competence, Final reports, Health education, Healthy Tomorrows, Kentucky, Local programs, Minority health, Prevention programs, Refugees

McNeely C, Sprecher K, Bates D. 2010. Comparative case study of caring across communities: Identifying essential components of comprehensive school-linked mental health services for refugee and immigrant children. Knoxville, TN: University of Tennessee, Center for the Study of Youth and Political Violence and Department of Public Health, 42 pp.

Annotation: This document reports on a qualitative evaluation of the Caring Across Communities program, an initiative that supports the development of school-connected mental health care models to reduce emotional and behavioral health problems among children in low-income, refugee, or immigrant communities. The report provides background on the study, lists program sites, discusses the study methods, and presents findings.

Contact: Center for Health and Health Care in Schools, George Washington University Milken Institute School of Public Health, 2175 K Street, N.W., Suite 200, Room 213, Washington, DC 20037, Telephone: (202) 994-4895 E-mail: chhcs@gwu.edu Web Site: http://www.healthinschools.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Cultural factors, Families, Health care delivery, Immigrants, Initiatives, Language barriers, Low income groups, Mental disorders, Mental health, Parents, Prevention, Program evaluation, Refugees, School health

U.S. Administration for Children and Families. [2005]. A childhood for every child: How compassion-driven solutions are transforming the nation's well-being. Washington, DC: U.S. Administration for Children and Families, 12 pp.

Annotation: This report describes ways in which Administration for Children and Families' (ACF's) services for poor children, families with few resources, developmentally disabled adults, and refugees have been strengthened during the past four years. The report discusses ACF's programs to strengthen families, empower communities, encourage youth development, and ensure child well-being. ACF's goals for the future are also discussed.

Contact: U.S. Administration for Children and Families, 370 L'Enfant Promenade, S.W., Washington, DC 20447, Telephone: (202) 401-9215 Secondary Telephone: (800) 422-4453 Web Site: http://www.acf.hhs.gov Available at no charge; also available from the website.

Keywords: Administration for Children and Families, Adolescents, Adults, Child advocacy, Children, Communities, Developmental disabilities, Families, Federal agencies, Federal programs, Poverty, Refugees

CDC Childhood Lead Poisoning Prevention Program. [2005]. CDC recommendations for lead poisoning prevention in newly arrived refugee children. Atlanta, GA: National Center for Environmental Health, 5 pp.

Annotation: This report provides recommendations for preventing lead poisoning among refugee children newly arrived in the United States. The report includes background information as well as recommendations in the following categories: (1) primary prevention of elevated blood lead levels, (2) identification of children with elevated blood lead levels, (3) early post-arrival evaluation and therapy, and (4) health education and outreach.

Contact: National Center for Environmental Health, 1600 Clifton Road, Atlanta , GA 30329-4027, Telephone: (800) 232-4636 Secondary Telephone: (888) 232-6348 Fax: E-mail: cdcinfo@cdc.gov Web Site: http://www.cdc.gov/nceh Available from the website.

Keywords: Child health, Children, Evaluation, Health education, Immigrants, Lead poisoning, Outreach, Prevention, Refugees

Hernandez M, Isaacs MR, eds. 1998. Promoting cultural competence in children's mental health services. Baltimore, MD: Paul H. Brookes Publishing Company, 370 pp. (Systems of care for children's mental health)

Annotation: This book defines cultural competence and outlines strategies for fostering it in a wide variety of mental health programs for children from birth to age 18 and their families. The book contains self-assessment tools, troubleshooting suggestions, planning assistance, methods for recruiting and retaining ethnically diverse staff, and tips on operating in a managed care environment. Section one focuses on the need to develop organizational infrastructures that support and further cultural competence. Section two reviews methods for incorporating cultural competence principles at the local community level. Section three is focused on special issues related to serving culturally diverse populations. And section four highlights the need to continue to research and evaluate the development of culturally competent services and systems. Advice on the impact of exposure to violence, substance abuse, and stress in immigrant and refugee populations is included.

Contact: Brookes Publishing, P.O. Box 10624, Baltimore, MD 21285-0624, Telephone: (800) 638-3775 Secondary Telephone: (410) 337-9580 Fax: (410) 337-8539 E-mail: custserv@brookespublishing.com Web Site: http://www.brookespublishing.com $32.95 includes shipping and handling. Document Number: ISBN 1-55766-287-8.

Keywords: Assessment, Child mental health, Children, Communities, Cultural factors, Cultural sensitivity, Culturally competent services, Immigrants, Minority groups, Organizations, Refugees, Research, Stress, Substance abuse, Violence

New York University, School of Medicine, Division of Primary Care Internal Medicine, New York Task Force on Immigrant Health. 1995. Cross-cultural care giving in maternal and child health: A trainer's manual. New York, NY: New York University, New York Task Force on Immigrant Health, 88 pp.

Annotation: This train the trainers manual provides information on training health care providers to deliver maternal and child health services to refugees and immigrant populations while taking their cultural, linguistic, and epidemiological needs into account. The manual contains an overview of the course's methodology, organization, and objectives; it provides introductions, background materials, instructional guidelines, exercises, and references for four training modules. Evaluation materials include a staff needs assessment survey, pre- and post-tests, and session evaluation forms; and the manual lists references and other resources. The training modules cover: working with interpreters, conducting cross-cultural medical interviews, health beliefs and practices across cultures, and family dynamics and domestic abuse. [Funded in part by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: New York University, Division of Primary Care Internal Medicine, Bellevue Hospital, 550 First Avenue, Old Bellevue, Room A615, New York, NY 10016, Telephone: (212) 263-8553 Fax: (212) 263-8788 E-mail: marc.gourevitch@nyumc.org Web Site: http://www.med.nyu.edu/medicine/dgim/ Available from the website.

Keywords: Child health, Children, Cultural sensitivity, Culturally competent services, Immigrants, MCH services, Manuals, Maternal health, Mothers, Refugees, Service delivery, Training

de Bocanegra HT, ed. 1994. Integrated maternal child health care for immigrant and refugee populations. New York, NY: New York University, New York Task Force on Immigrant Health, 49 pp.

Annotation: These proceedings are from a symposium held on December 6, 1993, which focused on delivering coordinated, culturally appropriate services for immigrant or refugee mothers and children. The proceedings summarize sessions that focused on these topics: immigrant health training in maternity and infant care family planning programs, health issues faced by this group, epidemiological factors, health care entitlements, a review of cross-cultural training curricula, taking cross-cultural medical interviews including the use of interpreters, differences in health beliefs and practices, domestic violence in immigrant families, and barriers to prenatal care encountered by Latina women in New York state. Appendices include biographical sketches and lists of the participants and the members of the curriculum committee. The symposium was sponsored by the New York Task Force on Immigrant Health, the New York State Perinatal Association, and the New York State Department of Health. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: New York University, Division of Primary Care Internal Medicine, Bellevue Hospital, 550 First Avenue, Old Bellevue, Room A615, New York, NY 10016, Telephone: (212) 263-8553 Fax: (212) 263-8788 E-mail: marc.gourevitch@nyumc.org Web Site: http://www.med.nyu.edu/medicine/dgim/ Available from the website.

Keywords: Access to health care, Child health, Children, Conferences, Cultural barriers, Cultural beliefs, Cultural factors, Culturally competent services, Domestic violence, Epidemiology, Family planning, Health attitudes, Health behavior, Hispanic Americans, Immigrants, Interviews, MCH services, Maternal health, Mothers, New York, Prenatal care, Refugees, Service coordination, Service delivery

Southeast Asian Developmental Disabilities Project. 1991. SEADD training manual for bilingual/bicultural counselors. San Diego, CA: Southeast Asian Developmental Disabilities Project,

Annotation: This manual, available in Spring 1991, is designed for counselors providing case management services to Cambodian, Hmong, Laotian, and Vietnamese communities as part of the Southeast Asian Developmental Disabilities (SEADD) Project. This project aims to reduce the ethnocultural barriers and enhance the availability and utilization of genetic and other maternal and child health services for the Southeast Asian refugee populations in San Diego County, California. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: San Diego- Imperial Counties Developmental Services, 4355 Ruffin Road, Suite 205, San Diego, CA 92123, Telephone: (619) 576-2813 Contact Phone: (619) 576-2963 Fax: (619) 576-2873

Keywords: Asian Americans, Case management, Disabilities, Refugees

Georgetown University, Center for Immigration Policy and Refugee Assistance, Georgetown University Medical Center, and National Center for Education in Maternal and Child Health. 1989. The Georgetown Declaration on Health Care for Displaced Persons and Refugees: Conclusions on progress, problems and priorities. Washington, DC: Georgetown University Medical Center, Center for Immigration Policy and Refugee Assistance and Georgetown University, National Center for Education in Maternal and Child Health, 26 pp.

Annotation: This publication presents a consensus statement and keynote addresses from the international symposium, 'Health Care for Displaced Persons and Refugees,' held December 4-7, 1988, and the Interagency Conference on Cooperation and Planning which preceded the symposium on December 1-3, 1988. Proposed by two Georgetown University Medical School faculty members, the symposium was designed to strengthen cooperation among refugee assistance groups, and to identify and confront uncertainties and controversies in refugee health care. Among the issues addressed in the consensus statement are consensus on technical issues and coordination of assistance during the emergency relief phase; coordination and program development beyond the emergency assistance phase; training and personnel issues; support for the 'United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees Policy and Guidelines Regarding Refugee Protection and Assistance and Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS);' and internally displaced persons.

Contact: Georgetown University, Center for Immigration Policy and Refugee Assistance, Georgetown University, CIED Box 579400, Washington, DC 20057, Telephone: (202) 687-3801 Fax: 202-687-2555 E-mail: cied@georgetown.edu Web Site: http://63.135.104.120/templates/cied/alumni/template.cfm?page=35&/ Available from the website.

Keywords: AIDS, Health, Interagency cooperation, Programs, Refugees, Service coordination

Benjamin MP, Morgan PC. 1989. Refugee children traumatized by war and violence: The challenge offered to the service delivery system. Washington, DC: Georgetown University Child Development Center, Child and Adolescent Service Support Program Technical Assistance Center, 48 pp.

Annotation: This monograph was written to disseminate information from a national conference on refugee children held in September 1988. The conference was sponsored by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau, the National Institute of Mental Health, the Catholic University of America, and the Georgetown University Child Development Center. The monograph discusses the migration process, the process of adaptation, barriers to service delivery, model programs and services, and successful service delivery approaches. A section addressing procedures for dealing with refugee children discusses the need for service providers to recognize the importance of taking the uniqueness of the refugee experience into account at every step of the service delivery process.

Contact: Georgetown University Center for Child and Human Development, Box 571485, Washington, DC 20057-1485, Telephone: (202) 687-5503 Secondary Telephone: (202) 687-5000 Contact Phone: (202) 338-1831 Fax: (202) 687-8899 E-mail: gucdc@georgetown.edu Web Site: http://gucchd.georgetown.edu Available from the website.

Keywords: Health services, Minority health, Program evaluation, Refugees

Weiss-Fagan P, Rumbaut RG, Arroyo W, Nidorf JF, Tong TM, Lourie NV, Berry J, Hunt DJ, Espino CM, Williams C, Hoang GN, de Monchy M, Teter H. 1988. Conference on Refugee Children Traumatized by War and Violence: [Papers]. Washington, DC: Georgetown University Child Development Center, Child and Adolescent Service Support Program Technical Assistance Center, ca. 400 pp.

Annotation: This document is a set of papers from a national conference on refugee children held in September 1988. The conference was sponsored by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau, the National Institute of Mental Health, the Catholic University of America, and the Georgetown University Child Development Center. The papers discuss the migration process, the process of adaptation, barriers to service delivery, model programs and services, and successful service delivery approaches. There is an emphasis on creating procedures for dealing with refugee children and the need for service providers to recognize the importance of taking the uniqueness of the refugee experience into account at every step of the service delivery process.

Contact: Georgetown University Center for Child and Human Development, Box 571485, Washington, DC 20057-1485, Telephone: (202) 687-5503 Secondary Telephone: (202) 687-5000 Contact Phone: (202) 338-1831 Fax: (202) 687-8899 E-mail: gucdc@georgetown.edu Web Site: http://gucchd.georgetown.edu Price unknown.

Keywords: Health services, Minority health, Program evaluation, Refugees

Butcher JN. 1987 (ca.). Cross-cultural psychological assessment: Issues and procedures for the psychological appraisal of refugee patients. Minneapolis, MN: University of Minnesota, 173 pp.

Annotation: This report provides information on problems and issues of psychological assessments of refugees in mental health programs. It discusses limitations of cross-ethnic clinical assessment, highlights promising procedures, and includes recommendations. It includes an index of psychological tests for cross-cultural assessment, which lists psychological tests to be applied to different cultures, listed by test and by language. Some of these tests are available in Spanish, Vietnamese, Cambodian, Laotian, and Hmong.

Contact: Education Resources Information Center, Institute of Education Sciences, U.S. Department of Education, 555 New Jersey Avenue, N.W., Washington, DC 20208, Telephone: (202) 219-1385 E-mail: Web Site: http://www.eric.ed.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Asian language materials, Cultural barriers, Cultural sensitivity, Guidelines, Psychological characteristics, Psychological evaluation, Refugees, Spanish language materials

San Diego-Imperial Counties Developmental Services. 1987. Service delivery models for outreach/prevention/intervention Southeast Asian refugee infants, children, and their families. San Diego, CA: San Diego-Imperial Counties Developmental Services, 73 pp.

Annotation: This document contains the proceedings of a conference held in May 1987. The purpose of the conference was to bring together representatives of the agencies and organizations serving the Southeast Asian refugee population and representatives of the Cambodian, Laotian, Hmong, and Vietnamese communities in order to share existing models of service delivery and discuss innovative ideas for improving services. The proceedings contain formal addresses as well as outlines of workshops on physical health, mental health, networking, and socioeconomic matters. The 12 appendices include workshop summaries and additional papers. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]]

Contact: Maternal and Child Health Library at Georgetown University, Telephone: (202) 784-9770 E-mail: mchgroup@georgetown.edu Web Site: https://www.mchlibrary.org Available from the website. Document Number: HRSA Info. Ctr. MCHB310.

Keywords: Asian Americans, Refugees

U.S. Bureau of Health Care Delivery and Assistance, Division of Maternal and Child Health. 1987. Meeting the needs of southeast Asian refugees in maternal and child health and primary care programs. Rockville, MD: U.S. Bureau of Health Care Delivery and Assistance, Division of Maternal and Child Health, 32 pp. (Maternal and child health technical information series, March 1987)

Annotation: This report provides a brief overview of the health needs of southeast Asian refugees in maternal and child health and primary care programs. Characteristics of southeast Asian refugees and common health problems are listed. Problems in providing health and policy implications are also covered. An annotated listing of projects in various states with southeast Asian refugees follows the report.

Keywords: Asian Americans, Programs, Refugees

U.S. Children's Bureau. 1941. Care of children coming to the United States for safety under the attorney general's order of July 13, 1940: Standards prescribed by the Children's Bureau. Washington, DC: U.S. Government Printing Office, 28 pp. (Bureau publication (United States. Children's Bureau); no. 268)

Annotation: This publication presents standards for the care of children who have come to the United States seeking refuge from European war zones. The standards are based on those developed by the Child Welfare League of America and cover general standards for child caring agencies serving European children, as well as standards of family-home care, foster care, medial care, and the care of children in reception centers. It is a publication of the U.S. Department of Labor, Children's Bureau.

Contact: Maternal and Child Health Library at Georgetown University, Telephone: (202) 784-9770 E-mail: mchgroup@georgetown.edu Web Site: https://www.mchlibrary.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Child welfare agencies, Foster care, Group homes, Refugees, Standards

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This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number U02MC31613, MCH Advanced Education Policy, $3.5 M. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.