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Strengthening the evidence for maternal and child health programs

Search Results: MCHLine

Items in this list may be obtained from the sources cited. Contact information reflects the most current data about the source that has been provided to the MCH Digital Library.


Displaying records 1 through 20 (20 total).

Tappin K. 2015. Inequities in maternal and child health: An analysis of policy, practice, and social determinants over the life-course. Greenbelt, MD: Mid Atlantic Health Policy Research Consortium, 43 pp.

Annotation: This paper examines the social determinants experienced over the life course and their influence on adverse birth outcomes for black women in Maryland. Contents include background on Maryland and data on maternal and child health (MCH) outcomes in Baltimore City, Montgomery County, Prince Georges County, and on the Eastern Shore; vital statistics data on the health of mothers and infants in Maryland; and a set of proposals to strengthen Maryland's policies and programs around MCH.

Contact: Health Policy Research Consortium, CTIS, 6401 Golden Triangle Drive, Suite 310, Greenbelt, MD 20770, Telephone: (301) 375-2021 Fax: (240) 582-7846 E-mail: info@hprc.info Web Site: http://hprc.info Available from the website.

Keywords: Adverse effects, Blacks, Health care disparities, Health disparities, Infants, Life course, MCH programs, MCH research, MCH services, Maryland, Mothers, Outcome and process assessment, Policy development, Pregnant women, Program development, Racial discrimination, Racial factors, Racism, Sociocultural factors, Socioeconomic factors, State programs, Statistical data, Women

Dowd AC, Bensimon EM. 2015. Engaging the "race question:" Accountability and equity in U.S. higher education. New York, NY: Teachers College Press, 240 pp.

Annotation: This book for college faculty, administrators, and student affairs professionals demonstrates what educators need to know and do to take an active role in racial equity work on college and university campuses. The book provides examples of policy and practice for improving equity in postsecondary education, examines the role of individuals and groups in the change process, includes examples of action research tools, and offers other strategies for professional development and organizational change.

Contact: Teachers College Press, 1234 Amsterdam Avenue, New York, NY 10027, Telephone: (212) 678-3929 E-mail: tcp.cs@aidcvt.com Web Site: https://www.tcpress.com $34.36 ebook; $43.95 paperback; $50.94 bundle (paperback and ebook); $86 hardcover. Document Number: ISBN 978-0-8077-5609-6.

Keywords: Accountability, Case studies, Colleges, Equal opportunities, Leadership, Organizational change, Policy development, Postsecondary education, Program improvement, Racism

CityMatCH, Association of Maternal and Child Health Programs, National Healthy Start Association, EveryWoman Southeast. 2013. Addressing racism's impact on infant mortality: Lessons learned from the Partnership to Eliminate Disparities in Infant Mortality. Washington, DC: Association of Maternal and Child Health Programs, 1 video (60 min., 24 sec.).

Annotation: This webinar explores the persistent gap in infant mortality between white and black infants and how to address challenges and opportunities. The experiences of 11 community and state teams and partners in addressing racism's impact on infant mortality are shared and lessons learned are described with actionable steps for programs to take. Examples are provided from California, Colorado, Connecticut, Florida, Ohio, Illinois, Louisiana, Massachusetts, Michigan, Texas, and Wisconsin.

Contact: Association of Maternal and Child Health Programs, 1825 K Street, N.W., Suite 250, Washington, DC 20006-1202, Telephone: (202) 775-0436 Fax: (202) 478-5120 E-mail: info@amchp.org Web Site: http://www.amchp.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Blacks, Case studies, Community programs, Infant death, Infant mortality, Multimedia, Racial factors, Racism, State initiatives

Martinez K, Franics K, Poirier JM, Brown Jr. LD, Wang M. 2013. A blueprint for using data to reduce disparities/disproportionalities in human services and behavioral health care. Washington, DC: American Institutes for Research, 40 pp.

Annotation: This blueprint describes a framework and multistep process to reduce disparities and disproportionalities in human services and behavioral health care. The steps discussed include (1) readiness, (2) community engagement, (3) identification, (4) assessment, (5) intervention, (6) evaluation/continuous quality improvement, (7) replication, and (8) sustainability. A case study in a hypothetical community is included.

Contact: American Institutes for Research, 1000 Thomas Jefferson Street, N.W., Suite 400, Washington, DC 20007, Telephone: (202) 944-5400 Secondary Telephone: (877) 334-3499 Fax: (202) 403-5454 E-mail: center@air.org Web Site: http://www.air.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Quality assurance, Access to health care, Communities, Data, Statistical data, Community programs, Cultural competence, Cultural factors, Ethnic factors, Human services, Intervention, Prevention, Program evaluation, Racial factors, Racism, Treatment

Rough A. 2012. The Partnership to Eliminate Disparities in Infant Mortality. Washington, DC: Grantmakers in Health, 2 pp. (Views from the field)

Annotation: This document provides information about the Partnership to Eliminate Disparities in Infant Mortality, which focuses on eliminating racial inequities contributing to infant mortality in U.S. urban areas. The brief discusses the partnership's activities, actions identified to reduce infant mortality, challenges and impacts, and lessons learned.

Contact: Grantmakers In Health, 1100 Connecticut Avenue, N.W., Suite 1200, Washington, DC 20036-4101, Telephone: (202) 452-8331 Fax: (202) 452-8340 Web Site: http://www.gih.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Blacks, Communication, Infant mortality, Intervention, Prevention, Programs, Racial factors, Racial factors, Racism, Urban populations

Cable LP. 2012. Conversations that matter: A how-to guide for hosting discussions about race, racism, and public health. Omaha, NE: CityMatCH; Charlotte NC: Lee Institute, 40 pp.

Annotation: This guide is intended to serve as a resource to assist public health professionals in initiating open and honest conversations about racism's impact on community health. Topics include how to use the guide, conversation essentials, essentials for group meetings, and essentials for planning teams.

Contact: CityMatCH, University of Nebraska Medical Center, Department of Pediatrics, 982170 Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, NE 68198-2170, Telephone: (402) 552-9500 E-mail: citymch@unmc.edu Web Site: http://www.citymatch.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Communication, Communities, Public health, Racial factors, Racism

Partnership to Eliminate Disparities in Infant Mortality. 2011. Infant mortality and racism: Action Learning Collaborative meeting summary. [no place]: Partnership to Eliminate Disparities in Infant Mortality, 6 pp.

Annotation: This report summarizes the second of three meetings of the Infant Mortality & Racism Action Learning Collaborative held on June 1-3, 2009, in Long Beach, California. The report provides background and discusses communicating about racism; racism, stress, and reproductive disadvantage; and planning for change.

Contact: National Healthy Start Association, 1325 G Street, N.W., Suite 500, Washington, DC 20005, Telephone: (202) 296-2195 E-mail: info@nationalhealthystart.org Web Site: http://www.nationalhealthystart.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Infant mortality, Racism, Reproductive health, Stress

Leavitt R. 2009. Cultural competence: A lifelong journey to cultural proficiency. Thorofare, NJ: SLACK, 264 pp.

Annotation: This book represents an effort to facilitate the development of cultural competence and cultural proficiency among physical therapists. The book covers theory, practice, and professional development areas of study that have frequently been omitted from the traditional curriculum for rehabilitation professional students or continuing education for the practitioner. Chapters 1,2, and 3 address the domains of culture and cultural competence from a broad perspective. Chapter 4 identifies special considerations that need to be addressed when doing an ethnography of a client. Chapter 5 is devoted to understanding disability. Chapter 6 focuses on present-day circumstances of disparities in health status, health care, and physical therapy. Chapters 7 and 8 are about poverty and racism. Chapter 9 is about communication. Chapter 10 introduces the concept of service learning and explores the relationship between service learning and cultural competence. Chapter 11 discusses the social construct of disability. Chapter 2 provides specific strategies to enable individual physical therapists and the profession of physical therapy to work toward increased cultural competence.

Contact: Slack, Incorporated, 6900 Grove Road, Thorofare, NJ 08086, Telephone: (856) 848-1000 Fax: (856) 853-5991 Web Site: http://www.slackbooks.com Available in libraries. Document Number: ISBN 978-1-55642-876-0.

Keywords: Chronic illnesses and disabilities, Communication, Cultural competence, Health, Health care disparities, Health status disparities, Physical therapists, Physical therapy, Physical therapy education, Poverty, Racism, Rehabilitation

CityMatCH. 2006. Undoing institutional racism: Defining terms; moving forward. CityLights 15(1):1-8,

Annotation: This issue of City Lights focuses on undoing institutional racism. The issue provides background on how racism affects urban women, children, and families and defines racism-related terms. Articles are also included on the challenge of undoing racism, research on reducing racial disparities in birth outcomes, CityMatch's effort to tackle racism, undoing racism in Seattle and King County, and addressing disparities in premature birth in the wake of the 2005 Gulf Coast hurricanes. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: CityMatCH, University of Nebraska Medical Center, Department of Pediatrics, 982170 Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, NE 68198-2170, Telephone: (402) 552-9500 E-mail: citymch@unmc.edu Web Site: http://www.citymatch.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Children, Families, Prevention, Racial discrimination, Racial factors, Racism, Research, State programs, Washington, Women, infants

Grantmakers for Children, Youth, and Families. 2006. Building constitutencies in diverse communities: Lessons from a learning journey. Insight: A Review of Current GCYF Topics and Issues. 1-38. Summer 2006,

Annotation: This issue describes factors involved in effective grantmaking strategies for working in diverse communities including: changing demographics, disparities, and the limitations of traditional grantmaking models. It analyzes the contextual dynamics through which the work of building constituencies in diverse communities takes place through three lenses: structural racism, racial equality, and inclusionary grantmaking. The issue discusses three work arenas in which the work of building constituencies takes place: internal practices, community engagement, and capacity building.

Contact: Grantmakers for Children, Youth and Families, 12138 Central Avenue, Suite 422, Mitchellville, MD 20721, Telephone: (301) 589-4293 Fax: (301) 589-4289 E-mail: info@gcyf.org Web Site: http://www.gcyf.org Available for members only.

Keywords: Foundations, Grants, Guidelines, Minority groups, Nonprofit organizations, Racism, Underserved communities

Berger L, McDaniel M, Paxson C. 2005. Assessing parenting behaviors across racial groups: Implications for the child welfare system. Princeton, NJ: Princeton University, Bendheim-Thoman Center for Research on Child Wellbeing, 42 pp. (Working paper no. 05-19-FF)

Annotation: This paper focuses on the process by which individuals make judgments about the parenting behaviors of others, and whether these judgments are influenced by race. The authors examine racial differences in parenting (if any) and whether racial differences in socioeconomic status and maternal characteristics can explain these differences. The paper, which includes an abstract, provides background, data and measures, empirical analysis, and conclusions. Statistical information is presented in tables grouped together at the end of the report. The report includes one appendix: interviewer-assessed maternal and child behavior characteristics. References and endnotes are included.

Contact: Princeton University, Bendheim-Thoman Center for Research on Child Wellbeing, Wallace Hall, Princeton, NJ 08544, Telephone: (609) 258-5894 Fax: (609) 258-5804 E-mail: crcw@opr.princeton.edu Web Site: http://crcw.princeton.edu Available from the website.

Keywords: MCH research, Maternal behavior, Parenting, Racial factors, Racism, Socioeconomic factors, Socioeconomic status

Walker VS, Snarey JR, eds. 2004. Race-ing moral formation: African American perspectives on care and justice. New York, NY: Teacher's College Press, 208 pp.

Annotation: The papers collected in this volume reveal the contribution of African American voices to understanding the relationship between justice and care. The first part of the text provides a psychological perspective on moral formation among African Americans during childhood, adolescence, and adulthood. Part two provides practical, pedagogical perspectives drawn from the past, present, and ongoing challenges of African American educational practices, focusing on what African American voices have to say about promoting care, justice, and moral formation within schools. Appendices include information on chapter-correlated films that illustrate these values and a summary of ways in which each chapter contributes to the understanding of each of the justice-and-care primary dual values. References, information on the contributors, and an index are included.

Contact: Teacher's College Press, 1234 Amsterdam Avenue, New York, NY 10027, Telephone: (800) 575-6566 Secondary Telephone: (212) 678-3929 Fax: (212) 678-4149 E-mail: tcpress@tc.columbia.edu Web Site: http://www.tcpress.com Available in libraries. Document Number: ISBN 0-8077-4449-2.

Keywords: Blacks, Criminal justice system, Education, Life skills, Moral development, Moral values, Racial discrimination, Racial factors, Racism, Social discrimination, Social integration, Social values

Barnes-Josiah D, Fitzgerald M, ed. 2004. Undoing racism in public health: A blueprint for action in urban MCH. Omaha, NE: CityMatCH, University of Nebraska Medical Center, 55 pp.

Annotation: This report, which focuses on strategies for eliminating racism and racial disparities in public health, is divided into three main sections. Section 1 examines the scientific basis for racism as a determinant of health status and health disparities, and how institutional racism manifests in health care and health departments. Section 2 provides an overview of existing directions, options, and resources for eliminating racism. Section 3 outlines a series of activities for a local public health-based initiative for eliminating racism. The report includes three appendices: (1) assessing institutional readiness and priorities for eliminating racism in local public health agencies, (2) a list of relevant organizations, and (3) a list of workgroup participants.

Contact: CityMatCH, University of Nebraska Medical Center, Department of Pediatrics, 982170 Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, NE 68198-2170, Telephone: (402) 552-9500 E-mail: citymch@unmc.edu Web Site: http://www.citymatch.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Attitude change, Attitudes, Health care, Health status, Initiatives, Public health, Public health agencies, Racial discrimination, Racism, Resource materials

Dunne C, Goode T. 2004. Using a book club to confront attitudinal barriers and other "isms". Washington, DC: National Center for Cultural Competence, 7 pp. (Seeds of change: Promising practices for enhancing cultural & linguistic competence at the individual and institutional levels)

Annotation: This pamphlet discusses how to use a book club to learn about bias, discrimination, stereotyping, and prejudice. It explains how books can be catalysts for change, how to make a book club a reality, the impact of such a book club, and how a book club can grow into something larger. The pamphlet also includes start-up strategies, sample book club selections, and contact information. The pamphlet highlights the experiences of the Family Support Organization of Burlington County, NJ, a group of parents or guardians of children with emotional, behavioral, or mental health challenges.

Contact: National Center for Cultural Competence, Georgetown University Center for Child and Human Development, P.O. Box 571485, Washington, DC 20057-1485, Telephone: (202) 687-5387 Secondary Telephone: (800) 788-2066 Fax: (202) 687-8899 E-mail: cultural@georgetown.edu Web Site: http://nccc.georgetown.edu Available from the website.

Keywords: Community programs, Cultural competence, Discrimination, Groups, Model programs, Racism, Reading, Social bias

Quiroz-Martinez J, HoSang D, Villarosa L. 2004. Changing the rules of the game: Youth development and structural racism. Washington, DC: Youth and Racial Equity Project Team, Philanthropic Initiative for Racial Equity, 48 pp.

Annotation: This report on findings from the Youth and Racial Equity Project focuses on a sample of 16 youth development and youth organizing groups that address structural racism (defined as the history, public policies, institutional practices, and cultural stereotypes and norms that together maintain racial hierarchies and inequitable racial group outcomes) as part of their work. The report, which includes an executive summary, is divided into the following main sections: (1) what is the Youth and Racial Equity Project?, (2) findings, (3) recommendations, and (4) appendices (which consist of participant lists). Some of the information is presented in figures, tables, and boxes.

Contact: Philanthropic Initiative for Racial Equity, 1720 N Street, N.W., Washington, DC 20036, Telephone: (202) 375-7770 Fax: (202) 375-7771 E-mail: info@racialequity.org Web Site: http://www.racialequity.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescents, Cultural factors, Outcomes, Public policy, Racial factors, Racism, Youth agencies, Youth development

Movement Strategy Center, Young Wisdom Project. 2004. Making space, making change: Profiles of youth-led and youth-driven organizations. [Oakland, CA]: Young Wisdom Project, Movement Strategy Center, 79 pp.

Annotation: This report provides background on youth-led organizations and highlights five youth-led social justice efforts, describing the lessons they have learned and the tools they have developed. The organizations are: (1) Youth Organizations United (HIV education and reproductive health policy), (2) Lummi CEDAR Project (respecting traditional values, building intergenerational bridges, and supporting youth-led community organizing, (3) Kids As Self Advocates (educating about youth with disabilities), (4) About Face Youth Theater (empowering lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and questioning youth and their allies), and (5) National Conference for Community and Justice (fighting bias, bigotry, and racism).

Keywords: Adolescent attitudes, Adolescent sexuality, Adolescents, Adolescents with special health care needs, Advocacy, Chronic illnesses and disabilities, Collaboration, Community organizations, Community programs, Education, HIV infection, Leadership, Moral values, Participation, Public policy, Racism, Reproductive health, Social change, Social values, Young adults

Shapiro I. 2002. Training for racial equity and inclusion: A guide to selected programs. Washington, DC: Aspen Institute, 125 pp.

Annotation: This publication provides an in-depth review and comparison of ten selected training programs developed to address racism and the changing shape of race relations through transforming people's attitudes and behaviors, intergroup relationships, and social institutions and policies. The report explores the programs' theory of practice and theory of change, and examines how programs understand the sources and dynamics of racial and ethnic oppression and what principles and methods they use to address the problems. Section contents include: (1) program summaries; (2) important related work; (3) similarities and differences across programs; and (4) challenges and implications. The report concludes with program selection guidelines and a bibliography. The appendices include interview questions and the observational protocol.

Contact: Aspen Institute, One Dupont Circle, NW, Suite 700, Washington, DC 20036-1133, Telephone: (202) 736-5800 Fax: (202) 467-0790 Web Site: http://www.aspeninstitute.org $12.00; also available from the website. Document Number: ISBN 0-89843-353-3.

Keywords: Cultural diversity, Ethnic groups, Program evaluation, Racism, Sensitivity training, Social behavior, Surveys

Bebelle CF, Quant T. 1994. The Community Leadership Training Institute: A Great Expectations community development strategy. (Draft). New Orleans, LA: Great Expectations, 11 pp.

Annotation: This document is designed to train local community leaders involved in the Healthy Start and other community based programs. Included in this guide are the mission statement, rationale, strategic goals, and objectives of the training program. The curriculum is organized into 12 sessions that include the following subjects: African heritage; community focused leadership; team building; barriers to effective leadership; developing community organizing processes; health issues; community issues; government and politics; action planning and problem solving; and a commencement. Also included in the curriculum are plans for ongoing development meetings where there would be opportunities for information sharing, recent issues review, progress reports, and action planning. A list of faculty profiles completes the document. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: Great Expectations Foundation, Inc., 4298 Elysian Fields Avenue, Suite B, New Orleans, LA 70122, Telephone: (504) 288-7818 Fax: (504) 288-7328 E-mail: arichard@greatexp.org Web Site: Price unknown.

Keywords: Communication skills, Community coordination, Community development, Community participation, Conflict resolution, Curricula, Economic factors, Families, Government financing, Healthy Start, Leadership training, Louisiana, MCH programs, Mediation, Negotiation, Public health, Racism, Strategic plans

Study Circles Resource Center. 1994. Can't we all just get along?: A manual for discussion programs on racism and race relations (2nd ed.). Pomfret, CT: Study Circles Resource Center, 41 pp.

Annotation: This teaching guide explains how to lead study circles in which the participants discuss race relations and racism in their communities. The guide contains two sections; the first contains materials necessary to develop a discussion program on this topic. It provides a context, core materials for five discussion sessions, suggestions for organizing and leading the sessions, and general information on the study circle method of promoting communication and problem solving. The second section provides suggestions for tailoring the material to specific communities or organizations, contains readings, and includes an annotated bibliography. A handbook for participants is available in English and Spanish; it is called "The Busy Citizen's Discussion Guide: Racism and Race Relations."

Contact: Everyday Democracy, 111 Founders Plaza, Suite 1403, East Hartford, CT 06108, Telephone: (860) 928-2616 Fax: (860) 928-3713 E-mail: info@everyday-democracy.org Web Site: http://www.everyday-democracy.org $5.00 plus $2.00 shipping and handling; discounts available for bulk orders.

Keywords: Communication, Community action, Conflict resolution, Group dynamics, Problem solving, Racism, Resources for professionals, Social problems, Spanish language materials

Study Circles Resource Center. 1994. The busy citizen's discussion guide: Racism and race relations (2nd ed.). Pomfret, CT: Study Circles Resource Center, 16 pp.

Annotation: This study guide is for the use of participants in study circles that are discussing racism and race relations in their communities. It discusses the rationale for talking about this problem, provides an overview, includes discussion topics for five sessions, and contains ground rules for discussing these problems in groups. This guide is a companion to the study circle leader's guide, "Can't We All Just Get Along;" it is available in English and Spanish.

Contact: Everyday Democracy, 111 Founders Plaza, Suite 1403, East Hartford, CT 06108, Telephone: (860) 928-2616 Fax: (860) 928-3713 E-mail: info@everyday-democracy.org Web Site: http://www.everyday-democracy.org $1.00 plus $2.00 shipping and handling; discounts available for bulk orders.

Keywords: Communication, Community action, Conflict resolution, Educational materials, Group dynamics, Problem solving, Racism, Social problems, Spanish language materials

   

This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number U02MC31613, MCH Advanced Education Policy, $3.5 M. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.