Skip Navigation

Strengthen the Evidence for Maternal and Child Health Programs

Search Results: MCHLine

Items in this list may be obtained from the sources cited. Contact information reflects the most current data about the source that has been provided to the MCH Digital Library.


Displaying records 1 through 20 (426 total).

CareQuest Institute for Oral Health, Arizona Oral Health Coalition, and Arizona Children's Action Alliance. 2022. Room to grow: An analysis of dental and health care claims in Medicaid-enrolled children in Arizona. Boston, MA: CareQuest Institute for Oral Health, 13 pp.

Annotation: This report provides information from a study that examined Arizona Health Care Cost Containment System health claims data to determine patterns of use of well-child medical visits and dental services in Arizona children enrolled in Medicaid from April 2016 to March 2020. The report introduces the issue and discusses methods. Results are presented on the following topics: demographic data of the study sample, days since the last dental or well child visit benefit was used, distance traveled to health care visit, procedure groupings by age group, access points to dental care by race, and a care-utilization model with presence of 1+ claims as the outcome variable.

Contact: CareQuest Institute for Oral Health, 465 Medford Street, Boston, MA 02129-1454, Telephone: (617) 886-1700 Web Site: https://www.carequest.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Access to health care, Age factors, Arizona, Health insurance, Low income groups, Medicaid, Oral health, Racial factors, State information, Statistical data

Public Counsel. 2022. Examining racial and ethnic inequities among children served under California's developmental services system: Where things currently stand . Los Angeles, CA: Public Counsel , 43 pp.

Annotation: This report examines racial and ethnic inequities in children's access to developmental services through California's Department of Developmental Services (DDS). It quantifies and evaluates inequities in service access and expenditures and examines the effectiveness of the set of measures developed by DDS to monitor and prevent inequities related to race, culture, and primary language spoken. A summary of findings is provided along with recommendations for legislative improvements that could help eliminate disparities to services for children with developmental disabilities in the state of California.

Contact: Public Counsel , 610 South Ardmore Avenue , Los Angeles, CA 90005, Telephone: (213) 385-2977 Fax: (213) 385-9089 Web Site: https://publiccounsel.org/ Available from the website.

Keywords: Access to health care, Barriers, California, Children with developmental disabilities, Cultural factors, Ethnic factors, Racial factors, State legislation

U.S. Government Accountability Office . 2022. Maternal health: Outcomes worsened and disparities persisted during the pandemic . Washington, DC: U.S. Government Accountability Office , 32 pp.

Annotation: This report to Congress describes 1) available federal data and what it reveals about maternal and neonatal outcomes and disparities during the COVID-19 pandemic, and 2) efforts by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) during the pandemic to address maternal health outcomes and disparities. The data is from CDC’s National Center for Health Statistics’ (NCHS) National Vital Statistics System and its Pregnancy Risk Assessment Monitoring System, a state-level surveillance system of survey-based data on maternal behaviors, attitudes, and experiences before, during, and shortly after pregnancy.

Contact: U.S. Government Accountability Office, 441 G Street, N.W., Washington, DC 20548, Telephone: (202) 512-3000 Secondary Telephone: E-mail: contact@gao.gov Web Site: http://www.gao.gov

Keywords: Data, Ethnic factors, Federal initiatives , Infectious diseases, Low birthweight, Maternal health, Maternal mortality, Neonatal morbidity, Prenancy complications, Preterm birth, Racial factors, Statistics, Virus diseases

U.S. Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality. 2022. 2022 National healthcare quality and disparities report. Rockville, MD: U.S. Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, 135 pp. (AHRQ publication no. 22(23)-0030)

Annotation: The annual National Healthcare Quality and Disparities Report summarizes the status of health and healthcare delivery in the United States. The 2022 version reports on more than 440 measures of quality and examines data in three sections: Portrait of American Healthcare; Special Emphasis Topics (maternal health, child and adolescent mental health, substance use disorders, oral health); Quality and Disparities Tables.

Contact: U.S. Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, 5600 Fishers Lane, Rockville, MD 20857, Telephone: (301) 427-1104 Secondary Telephone: (301) 427-1364 Web Site: http://www.ahrq.gov

Keywords: Access to health care, Adolescent mental health, Child health, Child mental health, Ethnic groups, Health care disparities, Health status disparities, Low income groups, Maternal health, Measures, Minority groups, Policy development, Poverty, Racial factors, Social factors, Socioeconomic factors, Socioeconomic status

American Dental Association, Health Policy Institute. [2021]. Dental care utilization among the U. S. population, by race and ethnicity. Chicago, IL: American Dental Association, Health Policy Institute, 1 p.

Annotation: This infographic provides information about oral health care use by race and ethnicity. Statistical information is presented in graphs on the percentage of children, adults, and older adults with a dental visit in the past year.

Contact: American Dental Association, Health Policy Institute, 211 East Chicago Avenue, Chicago, IL 60611-2678, Telephone: (312) 440-2500 Web Site: http://www.ada.org/en/science-research/health-policy-institute Available from the website.

Keywords: Adults, Ethnic factors, Health care utilization, Older adults, Oral health, Racial Factors

Community Catalyst. 2021 (ca.). Oral health policy equity tool. Boston, MA: Community Catalyst, multiple items.

Annotation: This tool was designed to help stakeholders analyze policies and focus oral-health-agenda setting on the principles of equity and community engagement. The tool includes (1) questions, discussion prompts, and resources to inform policy-agenda setting; (2) questions focused on how populations and marginalized groups will be affected by a policy, how inequities might be addressed, and how advocacy efforts can follow the lead of impacted populations and groups; (3) links to additional policy analysis tools; and (4) a follow-up survey.

Contact: Community Catalyst, Dental Access Project, 30 Winter Street, 10th Floor, Boston, MA 02108, Telephone: (617) 338-6035 Fax: (617) 451-5838 E-mail: info@communitycatalyst.org Web Site: http://www.communitycatalyst.org/projects?id=0014 Available from the website.

Keywords: , Advocacy, Ethnic factors, Low income groups, Oral health, Public policy, Racial factors

Community Catalyst. 2021 (ca.). Why does oral health matter?. Boston, MA: Community Catalyst, 1 p.

Annotation: This fact sheet provides information about the importance of oral health. It discusses links between oral health and overall health, health during pregnancy and childhood, economic security, academic success, and costs to states. Oral health disparities related to economic, racial, and geographic factors are also discussed.

Contact: Community Catalyst, Dental Access Project, 30 Winter Street, 10th Floor, Boston, MA 02108, Telephone: (617) 338-6035 Fax: (617) 451-5838 E-mail: info@communitycatalyst.org Web Site: http://www.communitycatalyst.org/projects?id=0014 Available from the website.

Keywords: , Costs, Economic factors, Educational attainment, Geographic factors, Oral health, Pregnant women, Racial factors

CareQuest Institute for Oral Health. 2021. The COVID-19 pandemic deepens oral health inequitites. Boston, MA: CareQuest Institute for Oral Health, (Communication brief)

Annotation: This brief highlights way in which the COVID-19 pandemic has accentuated oral health inequities. It discusses racial disparities in COVID-19 infections, hospitalizations, and deaths; persisting oral health disparities; and factors that contribute to having unmet oral health care needs. Other topics include the impact of racism and discrimination on oral health care use, the disproportionate impact of COVID-19 on oral health professionals of color and those serving underserved communities, and the importance of addressing inequities in oral health to achieve lasting change.

Contact: CareQuest Institute for Oral Health, 465 Medford Street, Boston, MA 02129-1454, Telephone: (617) 886-1700 Web Site: https://www.carequest.org Available from the website.

Keywords: COVID-19, Disease transmission, Health care utilization, Infectious diseases, Oral health, Racial factors, Virus diseases

Basu S, Alpert JL, Phillips RS. 2021. Primary care in the COVID-19 pandemic: Improving access to high-quality primary care, accelerating transitions to alternative forms of care delivery, and addressing health disparities. Boston, MA: Harvard Medical School, Center for Primary Care; New York, NY: Milbank Memorial Fund; Boston, MA: CareQuest Institute for Oral Health, 312 pp.

Annotation: This report presents ways that the COVID-19 pandemic has affected primary care. It discusses how well countries’ efforts to overcome the pandemic have worked, how primary care has been impacted by the pandemic, and how the field has innovated to adapt. Ways in which marginalized and vulnerable populations been disproportionally impacted by the pandemic are also addressed, along with how social determinants of ideologies including racism, ableism, and ageism have intersected and coalesced in the health inequities observed among communities and primary care patients. Lessons learned and how those lessons can be leveraged to catalyze systemic and structural change are also discussed.

Contact: CareQuest Institute for Oral Health, 465 Medford Street, Boston, MA 02129-1454, Telephone: (617) 886-1700 Web Site: https://www.carequest.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Age factors, Disease transmission, Global health, Infectious diseases, Primary care, Racial factors, Virus diseases

National WIC Association. 2021. Oral health needs in the WIC program. Washington, DC: National WIC Association, 5 pp.

Annotation: This paper affirms the National WIC Association’s support of the Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants and Children’s (WIC’s) commitment to promote oral health to program participants. Topics include oral health in young children, oral health in women, and racial and ethnic disparities in oral health. For each topic, ways that WIC staff can help are presented. Promoting oral health in the WIC program is also discussed.

Contact: National WIC Association, 2001 S Street, N.W., Suite 580, Washington, DC 20009, Telephone: (202) 232-5492 Fax: (202) 387-5281 E-mail: douglasg@nwica.org Web Site: http://www.nwica.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Ethnic factors, Federal programs, Health promotion, Infant health, Low income groups, Nutrition programs, Oral health, Racial factors, Women', Young children, s health

Manski R, Rohde F, Ricks T. 2021. Trends in the number and percentage of the population with any dental or medical visits, 2003–2018. Rockville, MD: U.S. Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, 18 pp. (Statistical Brief; no. 537)

Annotation: This brief provides information on the number and percentage of people with dental and medical visits using 2003–2018 data from the Medical Expenditure Panel Survey-Household Component (MEPS-HC). It includes findings in the following areas: medical and dental visits, medical and dental visits by race and ethnicity, and medical and dental visits by age. Data sources and definitions of terms are included. The brief also provides information about MEPS-HC.

Contact: U.S. Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, 5600 Fishers Lane, Rockville, MD 20857, Telephone: (301) 427-1104 Secondary Telephone: (301) 427-1364 Web Site: http://www.ahrq.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Age factors, Ethnic factors, Oral health, Racial factors, Statistical data, Surveys

U.S. Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality. 2021. 2021 national healthcare quality and disparities report: Introduction and methods. Rockville, MD: U.S. Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, 34 pp. (AHRQ publication no. 21(22)-0054-EF)

Annotation: This document provides background on the annual National Healthcare Quality and Disparities Report (NHQDR) and modifications that have occurred over time. This Introduction and Methods document also includes an overview of the methods used to generate estimates, measure trends, and examine disparities. The full report tracks over 200 healthcare process, outcome, and access measures, covering a wide variety of conditions and settings. Most of the analyses presented in the full report include data from 2000-2002 to 2013-2019.

Contact: U.S. Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, 5600 Fishers Lane, Rockville, MD 20857, Telephone: (301) 427-1104 Secondary Telephone: (301) 427-1364 Web Site: http://www.ahrq.gov

Keywords: Access to health care, Health care disparities, Health status disparities, Low income groups, Measures, Minority groups, Policy development, Poverty, Racial factors, Social factors, Socioeconomic factors, Socioeconomic status

U.S. Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality. 2021. 2021 National healthcare quality and disparities report. Rockville, MD: U.S. Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, 316 pp. (AHRQ publication no. 21(22)-0054-EF)

Annotation: This report summarizes the status of health and healthcare delivery in the United States. The 2021 report is organized in sections that provide an overview of the healthcare system and summarize access, quality, and disparity measures. In addition, the Quality and Disparity sections are divided into domain-specific chapters that highlight key healthcare trends or gaps in care. Appendixes include a list of data sources, definitions and abbreviations, and measures used in summary maps. The full report tracks over 200 healthcare process, outcome, and access measures, covering a wide variety of conditions and settings. Most of the analyses presented in the full report include data from 2000-2002 to 2013-2019.

Contact: U.S. Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, 5600 Fishers Lane, Rockville, MD 20857, Telephone: (301) 427-1104 Secondary Telephone: (301) 427-1364 Web Site: http://www.ahrq.gov

Keywords: Access to health care, Ethnic groups, Health care disparities, Health status disparities, Low income groups, Measures, Minority groups, Policy development, Poverty, Racial factors, Social factors, Socioeconomic factors, Socioeconomic status

Aspen Institute Strategy Group . 2021. Reversing the U.S. maternal mortality crisis . Washington, DC: Aspen Institute , 146 pp.

Annotation: This annual report addresses maternal morbidity and mortality in the United States and presents five big ideas on how to tackle the problem. The recommendations are based on white papers prepared by subject matter experts that provide background information and data on maternal mortality in the U.S.; analyze the current maternity care system; explore racism and racial inequity in maternal and health outcomes; and assess the role of Medicaid in understanding and potentially helping to solve the problem. The five big ideas are as follows: 1) Make a national commitment to improvement; 2) Build and support community care models; 3) Redesign insurance around women’s needs; 4) Tackle the racism that undermines women-centered maternity care; and 5) Invest in research, data, and analysis.

Contact: Aspen Institute, One Dupont Circle, NW, Suite 700, Washington, DC 20036-1133, Telephone: (202) 736-5800 Fax: (202) 467-0790 Web Site: http://www.aspeninstitute.org

Keywords: Community health, Health insurance, Maternal morbidity, Maternal mortality, Prevention, Public health, Racial factors, Racism, Women', s health

Hernandez-Cancio S, Gray V. 2021. Racism hurts moms and babies. Washington, D.C.: National Partnership for Women and Families; National Birth Equaity Collaborative , 7 pp. (Moms and Babies )

Annotation: This publication explores the link between interpersonal and community-level racism and its impact on preterm birth, lower gestational age at birth, and infant low birth weight. Rather than focusing on individual behaviors that put pregnant people of color at higher risk of poor health outcomes, the authors describe how the toxic stress of racism affects physiological processes. One in a ten-part series of publications titled Saving the Lives of Mothers and Babies produced jointly by the National Partnership for Women and Families and the National Birth Equity Collaborative.

Contact: National Partnership for Women and Families, Childbirth Connection Programs, 1875 Connecticut Avenue, N.W., Washington, DC 20009, E-mail: info@childbirthconnection.org Web Site: http://www.childbirthconnection.org

Keywords: Blacks, Infant health, Low birthweight, Maternal health, Pregnancy, Preterm birth, Racial factors, Racism, Risk factors

National Maternal and Child Oral Health Resource Center. 2020. Preventive dental visits for children and adolescents are important!. Washington, DC: National Maternal and Child Oral Health Resource Center, 2 pp.

Annotation: This infographic provides information about benefits of and barriers to receiving preventive dental visits for children and adolescents. It emphasizes the importance of these visits to reduce oral health problems and promote overall health throughout life. It discusses integration of oral health care into primary care, the cost savings that early intervention can confer, and disparities in oral health status and in access to oral health services. The infographic is available in English and in Spanish. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Maternal and Child Oral Health Resource Center, Georgetown University, Washington, DC 20057, E-mail: OHRCinfo@georgetown.edu Web Site: https://www.mchoralhealth.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Access to health care, Early intervention, Income factors, Low income groups, Medicaid, Non English language materials, Oral health, Prevention, Racial factors, Service integration, Spanish language materials

Center on the Developing Child at Harvard University. 2020. How racism can affect child development. Cambridge, MA: Center on the Developing Child at Harvard University, 1 p.

Annotation: This infographic illustrates how children's stress response systems react to systemic racism and everyday discrimination to negatively affect their learning, behavior and physical and mental health.

Contact: Center on the Developing Child at Harvard University, 50 Church Street, Fourth Floor, Cambridge, MA 02138, Telephone: (617) 496-0578 E-mail: developingchild@harvard.edu Web Site: http://www.developingchild.harvard.edu Available from the website.

Keywords: Brain, Child development, Racial factors, Racism, Social factors

Nguyen US, Smith S, Granja MR. 2020. Young children in deep poverty: Racial/ethnic disparities and child wellbeing compared to other groups. New York, NY: National Center for Children in Poverty, 20 pp.

Annotation: This report presents analyses with data that highlight the needs of young children and families in deep poverty, along with updated recommendations. Topics covered include differences in health and development indicators across income groups, differences in family and community factors across income groups, and racial/ethnic disparities in young children's experience of deep poverty.

Contact: National Center for Children in Poverty, 215 West 125th Street, Third Floor, New York, NY 10027, Telephone: (646) 284-9600 Fax: (646) 284-9623 E-mail: info@nccp.org Web Site: http://www.nccp.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Child development, Child health, Ethnic factors, Poverty, Racial factors, Social factors, Statistics, Young children

Ellmann N. 2020. Community-based doulas and midwives . Washington , DC: Center for American Progress , 37 pp.

Annotation: This report presents key perspectives, lessons learned, and policy recommendations for state- and federal-level initiatives that center around the work of doulas and midwives in addressing the nation’s maternal health crisis.The report discusses racial disparities in maternal and infant morbidity and mortality and describes how birth workers can help reduce health risks, particularly among black and indigenous individuals giving birth. Information and perspectives shared by doulas and midwives interviewed for the report fall into three major categories: 1) the role and importance of community-based birth workers and the re-centering of the community in pregnancy-related care; 2) guidelines for health care system integration and the role of government; and 3) the creation of a progressive vision for pregnancy-related care in the United States.

Contact: Center for American Progress, 1333 H Street, N.W., 10th Floor, Washington, DC 20005, Telephone: (202) 682-1611 Fax: (202) 682-1867 E-mail: progress@AmericanProgress.org Web Site: http://www.americanprogress.org

Keywords: Alaska natives , American Indians, Barriers, Blacks, Childbirth, Community health services, Maternal health, Maternal morbidity, Maternal mortality, Midwives, Pregnancy, Prevention services, Racial factors, Racism, Risk factors, Social support

Bey A, Brill A, Porchia-Albert C, Gradilla M, Strauss N. 2019. Advancing birth justice: Community-based doula models as a standard of care for ending racial disparities. [Brooklyn, NY]: Ancient Song Doula Services; Village Birth International; Every Mother Counts , 33 pp.

Annotation: This document outlines the ways in which community-based doula programs in New York state have been strategically implemented to serve families most at risk for poor maternal and infant health outcomes. It describes the state's Medicaid Doula Pilot program, including the potential cost savings; presents evidence on the effectiveness of doula care in improving childbirth outcomes; and offers recommendations for states that either provide or are planning to provide Medicaid coverage of doula care.

Contact: Ancient Song Doula Services , 521 Halsey Street , Brooklyn, NY 11233, Telephone: (347) 778-3490 E-mail: info@ancientsongdoulaservices.com Web Site: https://www.ancientsongdoulaservices.com/

Keywords: Childbirth, Cultural barriers, Ethnic factors, Medicaid, Midwifery, Community health services, Model programs, Racial factors, Social support, State Initiatives

    Next Page »

This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number U02MC31613, MCH Advanced Education Policy, $3.5 M. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.