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Strengthen the Evidence for Maternal and Child Health Programs

Search Results: MCHLine

Items in this list may be obtained from the sources cited. Contact information reflects the most current data about the source that has been provided to the MCH Digital Library.


Displaying records 1 through 20 (33 total).

Singleton M, Atukpawu-Tipton G, Joraanstad A. 2022. Advancing equity in home visiting. Arlington, VA: James Bell Associates, 9 pp. (National Home Visiting Resource Center innovation roundup brief)

Annotation: This brief summarizes several initiatives to advance health and/or racial equity in home visiting. Some examples include: Home Visiting Collaborative Improvement and Innovation Network 2.0 (HV CoIIN 2.0) Health Equity Collaborative, Michigan Home Visiting Initiative (MHV), and Massachusetts Racial Equity Movement. The brief also highlights the National Leadership Academy for the Public's Health (NLAPH) program.

Contact: James Bell Associates, 3033 Wilson Boulevard, Suite 650, Arlington, VA 22201, Telephone: (800) 546-3230 Fax: (703) 243-3017 E-mail: info@jbassoc.com Web Site: http://www.jbassoc.com

Keywords: Child health, Early childhood development, Ethnic groups, Family support services, Health equity, Home visiting, Model programs, Race, Social factors

Michener J. 2022. A racial equity framework for assessing health policy. New York, NY: Commonwealth Fund, 1 item

Annotation: This issue brief presents the Racial Equity and Policy (REAP) framework for systematically assessing health policy through the lens of racial equity. The framework considers three themes: disproportionality, decentralization, and voice.

Contact: Commonwealth Fund, One East 75th Street, New York, NY 10021, Telephone: (212) 606-3800 Fax: (212) 606-3500 E-mail: info@cmwf.org Web Site: http://www.commonwealthfund.org

Keywords: Ethnic groups, Health care disparities, Health status disparities, Measures, Medicaid, Race, Racial groups

Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services. 2021. Disparities impact statement. Baltimore, MD: Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services, 7 pp.

Annotation: This tool can be used by all health care stake holders to achieve health equity for racial and ethnic minorities, people with disabilities, sexual and gender minorities, individuals with limited English proficiency, and rural populations. The worksheet has five steps: identify health disparities and priority populations, define goals, establish health equity strategy, determine needs to implement strategy, monitor and evaluate progress.

Contact: U.S. Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services, 7500 Security Boulevard, Baltimore, MD 21244, Telephone: (877) 267-2323 Secondary Telephone: (410) 786-3000 Fax: Web Site: https://www.cms.gov

Keywords: Access to health care, Discrimination, Ethnic groups, Health care disparities, Health status disparities, Measures, Minority groups, Program evaluation, Race, Racial groups, Rural populations

Radley DC, Baumgartner JC, Collins SR, Zephyrin L, Schneider EC. 2021. Achieving racial and ethnic equity in U.S. health care: A scorecard of state performance. New York, NY: Commonwealth Fund, 1 item

Annotation: This report evaluates health equity across race and ethnicity, both within and between states, to demonstrate how health systems perform for Black, white, Latinx/Hispanic, American Indian/Alaska Native (AIAN), and Asian American, Native Hawaiian, and Pacific Islander (AANHPI) populations. The report displays data using multiple charts and figures; the data can also be displayed by individual race/ethnic group on its own. The report also recommends policy changes to address disparities in access to health care.

Contact: Commonwealth Fund, One East 75th Street, New York, NY 10021, Telephone: (212) 606-3800 Fax: (212) 606-3500 E-mail: info@cmwf.org Web Site: http://www.commonwealthfund.org

Keywords: Access to health care, Ethnic groups, Health care disparities, Health status disparities, Legislation, Measures, Policy development, Race, Racial groups, State programs

Annie E. Casey Foundation. 2018. Race equity crosswalk tool: Targeted and universal strategies achieve better and more equitable results. Baltimore, MD: Annie E. Casey Foundation, 2 pp.

Annie E. Casey Foundation. 2017. Considering culture: Building the best evidence-based practices for children of color. Baltimore, MD: Annie E. Casey Foundation, 16 pp. (Race for results case study series; 4)

Annotation: This case study examines the role of culture in informing and enhancing efforts to provide equity for children of color. Readers will learn how organizations are applying evidence-based practices in culturally relevant ways and how local programs are adopting nontraditional approaches to successfully serve communities of color. Case studies of successful programs include Strong African American Families, an evidence-based program that helps rural African American families strengthen family relationships, improve parenting skills, and develop youth competencies, and Con Mi Madre, which helps young Latinas and their mothers achieve goals for higher education.

Contact: Annie E. Casey Foundation, 701 Saint Paul Street, Baltimore, MD 21202, Telephone: (410) 547-6600 Fax: (410) 547-6624 E-mail: webmail@aecf.org Web Site: http://www.aecf.org

Keywords: Adolescents, Children, Children, Education, Ethnic groups, Evidence-based programs, Family support, Infants, Measures, Neighborhoods, Policy development, Race, Racial groups, Work force, Young children, Youth

U.S. Maternal and Child Health Bureau, MCH Training Program. 2016. Diversity and cultural competency resources. Rockville, MD: U.S. Maternal and Child Health Bureau, 2 pp.

Annotation: This document describes federal activities and resources to support diversity and cultural competency within the maternal and child health (MCH) work force. Topics include agency-wide strategic planning to improve health equity; pipeline training program requirements for collecting data on the race and ethnicity of trainees and faculty and the degree to which programs have incorporated cultural and linguistic competence into policies, guidelines, contracts, and training; and resources to support programs in advancing and sustaining cultural and linguistic competence such as technical assistance, peer mentoring, and collaboration.

Contact: U.S. Maternal and Child Health Bureau, Health Resources and Services Administration, 5600 Fishers Lane, Rockville, MD 20857, Telephone: (301) 443-2170 Web Site: https://mchb.hrsa.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Collaboration, Cultural competence, Cultural diversity, Culturally competent services, Data collection, Ethnic groups, Goals, Health care disparities, Health disparities, Information dissemination, MCH training programs, Measures, Mentors, Peer groups, Program development, Program improvement, Program planning, Race, Technical assistance, Work force

Coalition for Community Schools, Communities in Schools, Strive Together. 2016. Aligning networks to enable every student to thrive. Washington, DC: Institute for Educational Leadership, Coalition for Community Schools, 6 pp.

Annotation: This document describes progress toward educational equity and opportunities to achieve shared goals by aligning assets and expertise across networks, school districts, and communities. Contents include a unifying concept of student-centered education and five principles for driving the work. Topics include trusting relationships, cross-sector partnerships, purposeful engagement, actionable data, and shared accountability.

Contact: Institute for Educational Leadership, Coalition for Community Schools, 4301 Connecticut Avenue, N.W., Suite 100, Washington, DC 20008-2304, Telephone: (202) 822-8405 X111 Fax: (202) 872-4050 E-mail: ccs@iel.org Web Site: http://www.communityschools.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Accountability, Barriers, Collaboration, Community action, Data, Education, Equal opportunities, Ethnic groups, Networking, Policy development, Poverty, Public private partnerships, Race, Social support, Trust

Annie E. Casey Foundation. 2016. Tools for thought: Using racial equity impact assessments for effective policymaking. Baltimore, MD: Annie E. Casey Foundation, 16 pp. (Race for results case study series; 3)

Annotation: This case study discusses using racial equity assessment tools to measure the impact of proposed legislation on populations of color. The document looks at how two cities, Minneapolis and Seattle, used Racial Equity Impact Assessment (REIA) tools to promote equity for communities of color. In addition, this report includes resources to help foster the use of REIA tools.

Contact: Annie E. Casey Foundation, 701 Saint Paul Street, Baltimore, MD 21202, Telephone: (410) 547-6600 Fax: (410) 547-6624 E-mail: webmail@aecf.org Web Site: http://www.aecf.org

Keywords: Children, Ethnic groups, Legislation, Measures, Neighborhoods, Policy development, Race, Racial groups

Annie E. Casey Foundation. 2016. By the numbers: Using disaggregated data to inform policies, practices and decision-making. Baltimore, MD: Annie E. Casey Foundation, 12 pp. (Race for results case study series; 2)

Annotation: This publication features an inside look at how two organizations, the W. Haywood Burns Institute and the Kirwan Institute for the Study of Race and Social Policy, use disaggregated data on race and ethnicity to improve the lives of children and communities of color. The report includes a section on lessons learned, which provides readers with action steps and resources for using data on race to advocate for impacted communities.

Contact: Annie E. Casey Foundation, 701 Saint Paul Street, Baltimore, MD 21202, Telephone: (410) 547-6600 Fax: (410) 547-6624 E-mail: webmail@aecf.org Web Site: http://www.aecf.org

Keywords: Children, Communities, Data, Data analysis, Ethnic groups, Legislation, Measures, Neighborhoods, Policy development, Race, Racial groups

Nelson J, Brooks L. 2016. Racial equity toolkit: An opportunity to operationalize equity. New York, NY: Government Alliance on Race and Equity, 28 pp.

Annotation: The Government Alliance on Race and Equity (GARE) is a national network of government working to achieve racial equity and advance opportunities for all. This toolkit is designed to help local governments and community-based organizations integrate considerations of racial equity into all aspects of decision-making, including policies, practices, programs, and budgets. The toolkit provides examples of racial equity tools used in Seattle, Multnomah County in Oregon, and Madison, Wisconsin.

Contact: Government Alliance on Race and Equity, Race Forward, 145 East 57th Street, 4th Floor, New York, NY 10022, Telephone: 212-513-7925 Fax: 212-513-1367 E-mail: gare@raceforward.org Web Site: https://www.racialequityalliance.org/

Keywords: Community programs, Disparities, Ethnic groups, Measures, Policy development, Race, Racial groups, State programs

Annie E. Casey Foundation. 2015. It's time to talk: How to start conversations about racial inequities. Baltimore, MD: Annie E. Casey Foundation, 16 pp. (Race for results case study series; 1)

Annotation: This report tells how KIDS COUNT advocates in Nebraska, Wisconsin, and Washington used solid data, leadership, and citizen engagement to advocate for race-based legislation and community change. The document focuses on the importance of organizing community conversations about race as a first step toward action, and it provides examples from case studies in three different states. In addition, the report provides resources to help convene conversations on race.

Contact: Annie E. Casey Foundation, 701 Saint Paul Street, Baltimore, MD 21202, Telephone: (410) 547-6600 Fax: (410) 547-6624 E-mail: webmail@aecf.org Web Site: http://www.aecf.org

Keywords: Children, Ethnic groups, Legislation, Measures, Neighborhoods, Policy development, Race, Racial groups

Annie E. Casey Foundation, Kids Count. 2014. Race for results: Building a path to opportunity for all children. Baltimore, MD: Annie E. Casey Foundation, Kids Count, 32 pp. (KIDS COUNT policy report)

Annotation: This report explores the intersection of children, race, and opportunity. Features include the Race for Results index, which compares how children are progressing on key milestones across racial and ethnic groups at the national and state levels. Topics include 12 indicators that measure a child's success in each stage of life, from birth to adulthood, in the areas of early childhood; education and early work; family supports; and neighborhood context. Policy recommendations are included.

Contact: Annie E. Casey Foundation, Kids Count, 701 Saint Paul Street, Baltimore, MD 21202, Telephone: (410) 547-6600 Fax: (410) 547-6624 Web Site: http://www.aecf.org/MajorInitiatives/KIDSCOUNT.aspx Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescents, Children, Education, Ethnic groups, Family support, Infants, Measures, Neighborhoods, Policy development, Race, Racial groups, Work force, Young children

Annie E. Casey Foundation. 2014. Embracing equity: 7 steps to advance and embed race equity and inclusion within your organization. Baltimore, MD: Annie E. Casey Foundation, 13 pp. (Race equity and inclusion action guide)

Annotation: This action guide provides resources to help organizations and foundations achieve race equity. The guide presents seven key steps to advance race equity and inclusion and includes detailed descriptions for each of the steps. In addition, the guide defines core concepts, such as equity, inclusion, racial justice, racism, and systemic racialization.

Contact: Annie E. Casey Foundation, 701 Saint Paul Street, Baltimore, MD 21202, Telephone: (410) 547-6600 Fax: (410) 547-6624 E-mail: webmail@aecf.org Web Site: http://www.aecf.org

Keywords: Disparities, Ethnic groups, Measures, Policy development, Race, Racial groups

Calanan R, Juhl A, Mauritson K. 2012. The Basic Screening Survey: Children's oral health screening in Colorado, 2011–2012. Denver, CO: Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment, Oral Health Unit, 25 pp.

Annotation: This report discusses a statewide oral health screening survey of students in kindergarten and third grade enrolled in Colorado's public elementary schools in 2011–2012. In addition to presenting key findings, the report discusses screening methods and provides detailed results. Results include information about burden among students in third grade, burden by age, burden by school socioeconomic status, burden by race and ethnicity, burden by sex, trends in results of oral health screening; and Healthy People 2020 objectives. [Funded in part by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment, Oral Health Unit, 4300 Cherry Creek Drive, South, Denver, CO 80246, Telephone: (303) 692-2000 Secondary Telephone: (800) 886-7689 E-mail: cdphe.information@state.co.us Web Site: https://www.colorado.gov/pacific/cdphe/categories/services-and-information/health/prevention-and-wellness/oral-health Available from the website.

Keywords: State surveys, Age factors, Child health, Colorado, Ethnic factors, Healthy People 2020, Oral health, Race factors, Research, School age children, Sex factors, Socioeconomic factors, Surveys, Trends

U.S. Office of Minority Health. 2011. Data collection standards for race, ethnicity, primary language, sex, and disability status. Rockville, MD: U.S. Office of Minority Health,

Annotation: This resource presents data collection standards for measures used in national population health surveys sponsored by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, where respondents either self-report information or a knowledgeable person responds for all members of a household. The measures include race, ethnicity, sex, primary language and disability status, as required by Section 4302 of the Affordable Care Act. An explanation of the standards and a fact are also available from the website.

Contact: U.S. Office of Minority Health, The Tower Building, 1101 Wootton Parkway, Suite 600, Rockville, MD 20852, Telephone: (240) 453-2882 Secondary Telephone: (240) 453-2883 Fax: (240) 453-2883 E-mail: info@minorityhealth.hhs.gov Web Site: http://www.minorityhealth.hhs.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Data collection, Disabilities, Ethnic groups, Language, Race, Sex characteristics, Standards

Hofrichter R, ed. 2006. Tackling health inequities through public health practice: A handbook for action. Washington, DC: National Association of County and City Health Officials, 252 pp.

Annotation: This book, which is intended for local health departments (LHDs), provides ideas and examples for how LHDs can strengthen their ability to influence the root causes of health inequities. The purposes of the book are to (1) provide a conceptual framework, raise questions, and spur thought for exploring the nature and causes of health inequity and what to do about them and (2) offer a knowledge base, resources, case studies, and suggestions that can help reduce inequities. The book is divided into two main parts. Part 1 presents introductory material, and part 2 provides examples of successessful practices across the country. The book includes six appendices that offer exercises, selected resources and references, and articles on such topics as measuring health equity, communications, and how social injustice becomes embodied in differential disease and mortality rates.

Contact: National Association of County and City Health Officials, 1100 17th Street, N.W., Seventh Floor, Washington, DC 20036, Telephone: (202) 783-5550 Fax: (202) 783-1583 E-mail: info@naccho.org Web Site: http://www.naccho.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Case studies, Ethnic factors, Health, Income factors, Local government, Local programs, Low income groups, Public health, Race factors, Social factors

Kass BL, Weinick RM, Monheit AC. 1999. Racial and ethnic differences in health: 1996. Rockville, MD: U.S. Agency for Health Care Policy and Research, 26 pp. (MEPS chartbook; no. 2)

Annotation: This report presents estimates of health insurance coverage, access to health care, and health status for Hispanic, black, and white Americans. The estimates are drawn from the Medical Expenditure Panel Survey (MEPS). Graphs and charts illustrate the main points of the presentation.

Contact: U.S. Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, 5600 Fishers Lane, Rockville, MD 20857, Telephone: (301) 427-1104 Secondary Telephone: (301) 427-1364 Web Site: http://www.ahrq.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Access to health care, Blacks, Ethnic groups, Health insurance, Health status, Hispanic Americans, Race, minority groups

National Center for Education in Maternal and Child Health. 1998. PIC briefing book: Racial and ethnic health disparities in maternal and child health. Arlington, VA: National Center for Education in Maternal and Child Health, ca. 300 pp.

Annotation: This loose-leaf binder is a collection of articles and reports on health disparities faced by minority children and families. It addresses the priority areas selected by the Initiative to Eliminate Racial and Ethnic Disparities in Health and suggests roles for the maternal and child health community in this effort. The contents discuss current U.S. Department of Health and Human Services initiatives; race, ethnicity, and pregnancy outcomes; the health status of minority children; access to care; health disparities for adolescents; cultural competence; race and ethnicity data; and the history and future of health care for minority children and families. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: Maternal and Child Health Library at Georgetown University, Telephone: (202) 784-9770 E-mail: mchgroup@georgetown.edu Web Site: https://www.mchlibrary.org Available for loan. Document Number: HRSA Info. Ctr. MCH.

Keywords: Access to health care, Adolescent health services, Child health, Cultural sensitivity, Culturally competent services, Data, Department of Health and Human Services, Ethnic factors, Families, Health status, Initiative to Eliminate Racial and Ethnic Disparities in Health, MCH programs, Minority health, Pregnancy outcome, Race

Council of Economic Advisers. 1998. Changing America: Indicators of social and economic well-being by race and Hispanic origin. [Washington, DC]: Council of Economic Advisers; for sale by U.S. Government Printing Office, 74 pp.

Annotation: This chart book is intended to document current differences in well-being by race and Hispanic origin and to describe how such differences have evolved over the past several decades. The book is designed to educate Americans about the facts surrounding the issue of race in America. The charts show key indicators of well-being in seven broad categories: population, education, labor markets, economic status, health, crime and criminal justice, and housing and neighborhoods. This information is provided to be used as a benchmark for measuring future progress and can highlight priority areas for reducing disparities in well-being across racial and ethnic groups. The indicators in the charts were selected on the basis of their importance for economic well-being, as well as the quality and availability of data. The appendix indicates how to access additional information on these topics from federal government agencies.

Contact: U.S. Government Publishing Office, 732 North Capitol Street, N.W., Washington, DC 20401, Telephone: (202) 512-1800 Secondary Telephone: (866) 512-1800 Fax: (202) 512-2104 E-mail: contactcenter@gpo.gov Web Site: http://www.gpo.gov Available from the website. Document Number: ISBN 0-16-049616-0.

Keywords: Benchmarking, Bibliographies, Crime, Economics, Education, Health status, Housing, Minority groups, Population dynamics, Race, Racial factors, Socioeconomic factors, Statistics, United States, World Wide Web

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This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number U02MC31613, MCH Advanced Education Policy, $3.5 M. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.