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Strengthening the evidence for maternal and child health programs

Search Results: MCHLine

Items in this list may be obtained from the sources cited. Contact information reflects the most current data about the source that has been provided to the MCH Digital Library.


Displaying records 1 through 16 (16 total).

Rodriguez M, Horton B, Bammarito K. 2012. Toolkit for community health providers: Engaging ethnic media to inform communities about safe infant sleep. Washington, DC: National Center for Cultural Competence, 16 pp.

Annotation: This toolkit provides guidance on how community health providers can use media outreach to inform people about sudden unexpected infant death (SUID) and safe sleep. The toolkit discusses engaging ethnic media to achieve the greatest impact. The toolkit focuses on reaching communities at highest risk for SUID—African Americans, Hispanics (particularly Puerto Ricans), and Native Americans. Topics include understanding the audience, knowing what reporters need to tell a story, shaping a story, establishing relationships with reporters, and using the right tools to engage ethnic media outlets. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Center for Cultural Competence, Georgetown University Center for Child and Human Development, P.O. Box 571485, Washington, DC 20057-1485, Telephone: (202) 687-5387 Secondary Telephone: (800) 788-2066 Fax: (202) 687-8899 E-mail: cultural@georgetown.edu Web Site: http://nccc.georgetown.edu Available from the website.

Keywords: Blacks, Communities, High risk groups, Hispanic Americans, Infant death, Mass media, Media campaigns, Outreach, Prevention, Puerto Ricans, SIDS, Safety, Sleep position

Scott G, Simile C. 2005. Access to dental care among Hispanic or Latino subgroups: United States, 2000-03. Hyattsville, MD: National Center for Health Statistics, 15 pp. (Advance data from vital and health statistics; no. 354)

Annotation: This report presents national estimates of access to oral health care for the following five subgroups of Hispanic or Latino individuals in the United States: Mexican, Puerto Rican, Cuban, Central or South American, and other Hispanic or Latino. Topics include utilizing oral health care services, meeting oral health needs that are unmet due to cost, and identifying and understanding subgroup differences. Statistical information is presented in charts, graphs, and tables throughout the report.

Contact: National Center for Health Statistics, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 3311 Toledo Road, Room 5419, Hyattsville, MD 20782, Telephone: (800) 232-4636 Secondary Telephone: (888) 232-6348 Fax: (301) 458-4020 E-mail: nchsquery@cdc.gov Web Site: http://www.cdc.gov/nchs Available at no charge; also available from the website. Document Number: DHHS Pub. no. (PHS) 2005-1250.

Keywords: Access to health care, Barriers, Costs, Cuban Americans, Dental care, Ethnic groups, Health care utilization, Hispanic Americans, Mexican Americans, Minority groups, National surveys, Oral health, Puerto Ricans, Statistics

Deinard A. 2002. Does Education Limit Lead Burden?: [Final report]. Minneapolis, MN: University of Minnesota School of Medicine, 51 pp.

Annotation: Lead abatement is a costly and disruptive secondary prevention procedure that benefits only those who live in the abated home. Primary prevention interventions—which may be less expensive and reach more people—are necessary. This study assessed the efficacy of a community-based, intensive, culturally specific educational intervention for the primary prevention of lead burden. The study hypothesized that lead levels of children whose mothers received the intensive education will remain lower than those of children whose mothers receive basic education, and that mothers receiving the intervention will perform better on knowledge-based tests than will mothers who do not. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Technical Information Service, U.S. Department of Commerce, 5301 Shawnee Road, Alexandria, VA 22312, Telephone: (703) 605-6050 Secondary Telephone: (888) 584-8332 E-mail: customerservice@ntis.gov Web Site: http://www.ntis.gov Document Number: NTIS PB2002-107491.

Keywords: American Indians, Asians-All others, Blacks, Hispanics-All others, Hispanics–Mexican Americans, Hispanics–Puerto Ricans, Infants, Lead Poisoning Prevention, Lead Poisoning Screening, MCH Research, Newborn infants, Parent Education, Parents, Peer Counseling, Preschool children, Research, Toddlers

Telleen S. 2001. Use of Child Health Services by Hispanic Families: [Final report]. Chicago, IL: University of Illinois at Chicago, 59 pp.

Annotation: This study examined the influence of social context and acculturation on use of health services for preschool Mexican-American and Puerto Rican children in a major Midwestern city. Questions about health practices and service utilization were based on "Healthy People 2000" objectives for Hispanic children, including improving nutrition and reducing asthma morbidity; dental caries; high lead levels; and injuries/deaths from firearms, child abuse, motor vehicle crashes, and residential fires. The influence of health service availability, provider outreach, and mediating variables (e.g., knowledge of health services/practices, parental beliefs/attitudes, sense of control over their children's health) were examined. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Technical Information Service, U.S. Department of Commerce, 5301 Shawnee Road, Alexandria, VA 22312, Telephone: (703) 605-6050 Secondary Telephone: (888) 584-8332 E-mail: customerservice@ntis.gov Web Site: http://www.ntis.gov Document Number: NTIS PB2001-106924.

Keywords: Access to Health, Care, Cultural Sensitivity, Hispanics, Hispanics–Mexican Americans, Hispanics–Puerto Ricans, MCH Research, Parents, Puerto Ricans, Research, School-age children

Alarcon O. 2000. Social Context of Puerto Rican Child Health and Growth: [Final report]. Wellesley, MA: Wellesley College, 60 pp.

Annotation: The specific aims of this study were to: (1) Describe the life patterns of children of Puerto Rican origin living on the U.S. mainland, taking into consideration variations in socioeconomic status (SES), gender, and color; (2) describe Puerto Rican children's experiences with migration and the impact of migration on the interconnected contexts of their family, peer groups, school, neighborhood, and ethnic community, as well as the majority culture; and (3) examine the relationships between migration, social contexts, and Puerto Rican children's development, both cross-sectionally and longitudinally. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Technical Information Service, U.S. Department of Commerce, 5301 Shawnee Road, Alexandria, VA 22312, Telephone: (703) 605-6050 Secondary Telephone: (888) 584-8332 E-mail: customerservice@ntis.gov Web Site: http://www.ntis.gov Document Number: NTIS PB2000-106925.

Keywords: Data Collection, Hispanics–Puerto Ricans, MCH Research, Minority Groups, Parents, Puerto Ricans, Research, School-age children

Howard C. 1997. Antenatal Formula Distribution: Effect on Breastfeeding: [Final report]. Rochester, NY: University of Rochester, 63 pp.

Annotation: This study examined the influence of commercial formula advertising and formula distribution (through physicians' offices) on breastfeeding initiation and duration. The study protocol incorporated both antenatal and postnatal components. Women were recruited from two private practices at Rochester General Hospital—one practice served primarily Caucasian women and the other provided care for a racially and ethnically diverse population of Caucasian, African-American, and Hispanic women. Nearly half of the study sample was drawn from a geographic area in which approximately one-quarter of the population lived below the Federal poverty level. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Technical Information Service, U.S. Department of Commerce, 5301 Shawnee Road, Alexandria, VA 22312, Telephone: (703) 605-6050 Secondary Telephone: (888) 584-8332 E-mail: customerservice@ntis.gov Web Site: http://www.ntis.gov Document Number: NTIS PB2001-102611.

Keywords: Blacks, Breastfeeding, Hispanics-All others, Hispanics–Puerto Ricans, Infant Nutrition, Infant formula, Infants, MCH Research, Newborn infants, Nonpregnant women (not otherwise identified as adolescents), Pregnant women (not otherwise defined as adolescents), Research

Damio G, Hill N, Lebron E. 1995. Lactancia: Herencia y orgullo—A manual for the training of breastfeeding peer counselors in the Puerto Rican community. Hartford, CT: Hispanic Health Council, 2 v.

Annotation: This manual, available in English and Spanish, uses a participatory training model to help peer counselors promote breastfeeding in the Puerto Rican community in Hartford, Connecticut. The title translates into English as "Breastfeeding: Heritage and Pride." The authors include material that will help peer counselors reach the target population more effectively. The two main training themes are the breastfeeding family and reclaiming breastfeeding as a cultural practice. The guide contains materials for eight training sessions that cover the benefits of breastfeeding, the breast and how it works, breastfeeding and the Puerto Rican community, prevention and management of breastfeeding problems, and counseling skills. Appendices include forms, supporting materials, and transparencies for use in the training sessions; and information about Puerto Rican history, culture, language, and diet. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: Hispanic Health Council, Center for Women and Children's Health, 175 Main Street, Hartford, CT 06106, Telephone: (860) 527-0856 Fax: (860) 724-0437 Web Site: http://www.hispanichealth.com/hhc/womenandchildren $30.00 for each language, $50.00 for both English and Spanish includes shipping and handling.

Keywords: Breastfeeding, Breastfeeding promotion, Connecticut, Ethnic groups, Peer counselors, Puerto Ricans, Spanish language materials, Training

Becerra J, Mather F. 1995. Low birthweight and infant mortality in Puerto Rico. Arlington, VA: National Center for Education in Maternal and Child Health, 6 pp. (Research roundtable special research presentation)

Annotation: This report studies the infant deaths associated with low birthweight on mainland Puerto Rico and among Puerto Ricans in the continental United States. It considers the relative contributions of maternal age, martial status, maternal education, hospital of birth and use of prenatal care in Puerto Rico. It also assess the contributions of the same factors to infant mortality after accounting for the effect of birthweight. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Center for Education in Maternal and Child Health, Georgetown University, Telephone: (202) 784-9770 E-mail: mchgroup@georgetown.edu Web Site: https://www.ncemch.org Photocopy available at no charge.

Keywords: Education, Infant mortality, Low birthweight, Marital status, Maternal age, Prenatal care, Puerto Ricans, Puerto Rico

Wilk VA. 1994. Farmworker women speak out: Priorities and policy recommendations to improve the lives of farmworker families. Washington, DC: Farmworker Justice Fund, 24 pp.

Annotation: This report traces the development of the Farmworker Women's Health Project in 1991. It focuses on the founding conference, the first meeting of the steering committee, and two subsequent conferences that focused on farmworker women and AIDS. The report describes events at each of the meetings that contributed to the formulation of the policy recommendations contained in the report. These recommendations cover specific health issues that are important to farmworker women such as AIDS, health, housing, exposure to pesticides, and wages and working conditions. [Funded in part by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: Farmworker Justice Fund, 1126 16th Street NW, Suite 270, Washington, DC 20036, Telephone: (202) 293-5420 Fax: (202) 293-5427 Web Site: http://www.fwjustice.org/ Available from the website.

Keywords: AIDS, Asian Americans, Blacks, Conferences, Employment, Farm workers, Housing, Mexican Americans, Migrants, Policy development, Public health, Puerto Ricans, Women, Women's health

Alarcon O, Erkut S, Coll CG, Vazquez Garcia HA. 1994. An approach to engaging in culturally-sensitive research on Puerto Rican youth. Wellesley, MA: Wellesley College, Center for Research on Women, 14 pp. (Working paper series; no. 275)

Annotation: This paper studies two culturally sensitive longitudinal studies of the development of Puerto Rican children and adolescents growing up in the continental United States. The paper defines the objectives of the research studies, identifies the measures that will be used to monitor the studies, explains the background of the studies, and discusses the findings to date. One study focuses on the socio-emotional development of this group; the other analyzes their overall health and growth. The two studies consider factors such as acculturation, family functioning and values, perceived discrimination, the child's perception of color, the receptivity of the social environment, and language issues. [Funded in part by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: Wellesley College Center for Research on Women, Wellesley Center for Women (WCW), 106 Central Street, Wellesley, MA 02481-8259, Telephone: (781) 283-2500 Secondary Telephone: (781) 283-2837 Contact Phone: (617) 235-0320 Fax: (781) 283-2504 E-mail: wcw@wellesley.edu Contact E-mail: oalarcon@wellesley.edu, or rknopf@wellesley.edu Web Site: http://www.wcwonline.org Available in libraries.

Keywords: Adolescents, Children, Cultural sensitivity, Development, Emotional development, Health, Longitudinal studies, Psychosocial development, Puerto Ricans

Arcia E, Keyes L, Gallagher JJ, Chabhar M. 1993. Status of young Mexican-American and Puerto Rican children: Implications for early intervention systems. Chapel Hill, NC: University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Carolina Institute for Child and Family Policy, Carolina Policy Studies Program, 30 pp.

Annotation: According to the authors, concern about the delivery of services to culturally diverse groups seldom goes beyond the general recognition that such groups are different from mainstream, middle-class families. The notion that there are significant differences between various culturally diverse groups rarely becomes part of the professional discussion or professional planning. This report compares two such groups from the Hispanic community. It points out some major differences in the families and children comprising these groups and the implications of those differences for early intervention systems. For example, the report points out that the same prevalence of problems cannot automatically be expected for every group or subgroup. A table summarizing the results of the study, probable consequences, and policy implications is provided.

Contact: Carolina Institute for Child and Family Policy, Carolina Policy Studies Program, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, 300 NationsBank Plaza, Chapel Hill, NC 27599, Telephone: (919) 962-7374 Available from the website.

Keywords: Children with special health care needs, Cultural barriers, Culturally competent services, Early intervention, Family centered services, Hispanic Americans, Mexican Americans, Puerto Ricans

Feliciano C. 1990 (ca.). Pilot Project for the Establishment of a Health Services System for Llorens Torres High-Risk Youth [Final report]. Santurce, PR: Municipality of San Juan, 46 pp.

Annotation: The overall goal of this project was to develop strategies which improved the physical, emotional, and mental health of Llorens Torres high-risk adolescents in San Juan and which can be replicated in other metropolitan areas in Puerto Rico and the United States. The overall objective was to establish an adolescent health promotion, disease prevention, and risk reduction program for Llorens Torres adolescents. Activities included the development of a multiservice, community-based health services system and the establishment of a multidisciplinary health team for the screening, evaluation, and treatment of youth enrolled in the project. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Technical Information Service, U.S. Department of Commerce, 5301 Shawnee Road, Alexandria, VA 22312, Telephone: (703) 605-6050 Secondary Telephone: (888) 584-8332 E-mail: customerservice@ntis.gov Web Site: http://www.ntis.gov Document Number: NTIS PB96-181524.

Keywords: Adolescents, Adolescents and Preventive Health, Community-Based Health Services, Counseling, Data Collection, Health Promotion, High risk adolescents, High risk groups, Interdisciplinary Teams, Minorities, Puerto Ricans, School Dropouts, Schools

Bryan AH, Bryan RB, Lahab BB, Quinones-Toyos NA. 1989. Nutritional Resources of Young, Pregnant, Negro and Puerto Rican Women Living in New York City [Final report]. Chapel Hill, NC: University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, 27 pp.

Annotation: This report provides a descriptive study of the nutritional resources and dietary practices of young, pregnant, African-American and Puerto Rican women with low incomes living in New York City. The report identifies factors that are determinants of these women's ability to profit from dietary counseling and treatment. The report describes the study methods, subjects' general characteristics, subjects' obstetrical history, and subjects' nutritional resources and dietary practices. A summary, conclusions, and references are included Statistical information is presented in tables grouped together at the end of the report.

Keywords: Blacks, Diet, Low income groups, New York, Nutrition, Nutrition counseling, Nutrition education, Pregnancy, Puerto Ricans, Treatment, Women's health

Costantino G, Malgady RG, Rogler LH. 1985. Cuento therapy: Folktales as a culturally sensitive psychotherapy for Puerto Rican children. Maplewood, NJ: Waterfront Press, 84 pp. (Hispanic Research Center monograph series)

Annotation: This book is the twelfth monograph in the Hispanic Research Center at Fordham University Monograph Series. The monograph discusses the meaning of culturally sensitive therapy for Hispanics and goes on to describe the background of cuento or folktale therapy. The processes by which such therapies have been investigated and evaluated are detailed and the final section of the monograph discusses the clinical usefulness of cuento therapy for emotionally troubled children. The Hispanic Research Center at Fordham University Monograph Series consists of twelve monographs published between 1978 and 1985.

Keywords: Hispanic Americans, Mental health, Multicultural populations, Puerto Ricans

Trevino FM, ed. Hispanic health and nutrition: Examination survey, 1982-1984—Findings on health status and health care needs. American Journal of Public Health 80(Supplement):1-72. December 1990.,

Annotation: This special supplement to the "American Journal of Public Health" highlights findings of the Hispanic Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, 1982-84. The health status and health care need data on Hispanics can provide useful information to school administrators, health care providers, and health educators working with Hispanic school-aged children in understanding acculturation, use of preventive health services, health-risk behaviors, alcohol consumption and drug use, and dental health.

Contact: American Public Health Association, 800 I Street, N.W., Washington, DC 20001-3710, Telephone: (202) 777-2742 Secondary Telephone: Fax: (202) 777-2534 E-mail: comments@apha.org Web Site: http://www.apha.org $10.00 plus $3.00 shipping and handling.

Keywords: Access to health care, Cuban Americans, Data, Health care utilization, Hispanic Americans, Injury prevention, Mexican Americans, National surveys, Puerto Ricans, Substance abuse

American Medical Association. [Special issue on Hispanic health issues]. JAMA: Journal of the American Medical Association. 265(2):174-257. January 9, 1991.,

Annotation: This journal issue is primarily dedicated to Hispanic health issues and includes articles on measures of health status, health insurance coverage, and health services utilization. Also included are commentaries, editorials and an AMA Council on Scientific Affairs report on Hispanic health in the United States.

Contact: American Medical Association, 515 North State Street, Chicago, IL 60610, Telephone: (800) 621-8335 Fax: Web Site: http://www.ama-assn.org Back issues of the journal are available at no charge, as long as copies are available.

Keywords: Access to health care, Cuban Americans, Health care utilization, Hispanic Americans, Mexican Americans, National surveys, Puerto Ricans

   

This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number U02MC31613, MCH Advanced Education Policy, $3.5 M. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.