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Strengthening the evidence for maternal and child health programs

Search Results: MCHLine

Items in this list may be obtained from the sources cited. Contact information reflects the most current data about the source that has been provided to the MCH Digital Library.


Displaying records 1 through 20 (20 total).

Body D. [2020]. The true cost of caregiving: Why an equitable care system for children, adults, and elders is essential to household financial security. Washington, DC: Aspen Institute Financial Security Program, 29 pp. (exec. summ. 3 pp.).

Annotation: This report illustrates four pillars of care: child care and early education, adult and elder care, family caregiving and self care, and professional caregiving. It addresses (1) how existing care systems support households; (2) what the greatest unmet care needs are for households; (3) how design principles can better address care needs; and (4) what promising policy proposals and opportunities exist to improve household financial security.

Contact: Aspen Institute, One Dupont Circle, NW, Suite 700, Washington, DC 20036-1133, Telephone: (202) 736-5800 Fax: (202) 467-0790 Web Site: http://www.aspeninstitute.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Child care, Costs, Early childhood education, Elder care, Financial support, Public policies

Watts MH, Michel KH. 2020. Equitable enforcement to achieve health equity: An introductory guide for policymakers and practitioners. Oakland, CA: ChangeLab Solutions, 52 pp.

Annotation: This guide poses a series of questions that policymakers, advocates, and enforcement officials should ask when drafting, implementing, and enforcing a public health policy. It aims to help such actors explore (1) the equity implications of traditional public health enforcement tools, and (2) strategies to avoid unintended negative consequences when enforcing violations of the law. The guide also explores best practices in design and development of enforcement provisions that avoid inequitable impacts and promote community health.

Contact: ChangeLab Solutions, 2201 Broadway, Suite 502, Oakland, CA 94612, Telephone: (510) 302-3380 Web Site: http://changelabsolutions.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Best practices, Health equity, Law enforcement, Model programs, Public health, Public policies

National Scientific Council on the Developing Child . 2020. Connecting the brain to the rest of the body: Early childhood development and lifelong health are deeply intertwined. Cambridge, MA: Center on the Developing Child at Harvard University, 2 items. (Working paper no. 15; In brief)

Annotation: These resources discuss the interaction of biological systems in the body, effects of excessive and persistent adversity early in life, the sensitivity of the brain's developing circuits, effects of early, frequent activation of the immune system, effects of the combination of stress and inflammation, and implications for policy and practice.

Contact: Center on the Developing Child at Harvard University, 50 Church Street, Fourth Floor, Cambridge, MA 02138, Telephone: (617) 496-0578 E-mail: developingchild@harvard.edu Web Site: http://www.developingchild.harvard.edu Available from the website.

Keywords: Adverse effects, Biological sciences, Public policies, Young children

Szekely A, Gebhard B. 2019. Infants and toddlers in the policy picture: A self-assessment toolkit for states. Washington, DC: Zero to Three, 65 pp.

Annotation: This toolkit is intended to help state policy leaders and advocates assess the current status of services for infants, toddlers, and their families, and to set priorities for improvement. A user-friendly format allows users to easily access state information from national sources, assess how their state compares to other states, and gather stakeholder input. Topics include an overview, good health, strong families, positive early learning experiences, and collaboration and system building. Additional resources include stakeholder survey questions in an editable Excel format, family survey template as PDF and Survey Monkey templates in English and Spanish, and a list of suggested stakeholders for completing the self-assessment checklist.This toolkit is intended to help state policy leaders and advocates assess the current status of services for infants, toddlers, and their families, and to set priorities for improvement. A user-friendly format allows users to easily access state information from national sources, assess how your state compares to other states, and gather stakeholder input.

Contact: ZERO TO THREE: National Center for Infants, Toddlers and Families, 1255 23rd Street, N.W., Suite 350, Washington, DC 20037, Telephone: (202) 638-1144 Fax: (202) 638-0851 Web Site: http://www.zerotothree.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Early childhood education, Families, Infants, Manuals, Program development, Program evaluation, Public health services, Public policies, Toddlers

Johnson-Staub C. 2014. First steps for early success: State strategies to support develpmental screening in early childhood settings. Washington, DC: Center for Law and Social Policy, 16 pp.

Annotation: This document discusses current trends to access to developmental screening, private and federal efforts to increase access (including Head Start, the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act Parts B and C, Medicaid and Title V of the Maternal and Child Health Block Grants), and challenges in expanding access. It then discusses state policies supporting developmental screening in child care and early education (including licensing, subsidies, pre-kindergarten, quality initiatives and service coordination) and state policy recommendations.

Contact: Center for Law and Social Policy, 1200 18th Street, N.W., Suite 200, Washington, DC 20036, Telephone: (202) 906-8000 Fax: (202) 842-2885 E-mail: http://www.clasp.org/about/contact Web Site: http://www.clasp.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Access to health care, Developmental screening, Public policies, State programs, Young children

Kimminau KS, Huang C, McGlasson D, Kim J. [2005]. Smiles across Kansas: 2004—The oral health of Kansas children. [Topeka, KS]: Kansas Department of Health and the Environment, Division of Health, 45 pp.

Annotation: This report focuses on the Smiles Across Kansas project, the purpose of which was to complete a comprehensive oral health survey of students in third grade in Kansas. The report discusses (1) key findings in the following areas: tooth decay, untreated tooth decay, dental sealants, dental insurance, time and reason for last dental visit, and urban and rural income disparities and (2) strategies, policies, and promising practices in other states. A discussion, implications, recommendations, and methods and research design are also included. The report includes four appendices that contain consent, screening, and screening results forms and information about population density peer groups and regional groups. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: Kansas Department of Health and Environment, Bureau of Oral Health, Curtis State Office Building, 1000 S.W. Jackson Street, Suite 200, Topeka, KS 66612-1274, Telephone: (785) 296-5116 Web Site: http://www.kdheks.gov/ohi Available from the website.

Keywords: Child health, Children, Dental caries, Dental sealants, Economic factors, Families, Health insurance, Kansas, Oral health, Parents, Public policies, Rural health, Rural population, School age children, Screening, State programs, Surveys, Urban health, Urban population

National League of Cities, Council on Youth, Education, and Families. [2005]. A city platform for strengthening families and improving outcomes for children and youth. Washington, DC: Council on Youth, Education, and Families, National League of Cities, 4 pp.

Annotation: This fact sheet for mayors and city councilmembers provides an agenda for municipal action and leadership on behalf of children, youth, and their families. The document discusses the costs of inaction, four essential tasks for sustained progress, and key action steps to consider. Topics for action steps include early childhood development, youth development, education and afterschool, health and safety, youth in transition, family economic success, and neighborhoods and the community.

Contact: National League of Cities, 1301 Pennsylvania Avenue, N.W., Suite 550, Washington, DC 20004-1763, Telephone: (877) 827-2385 Fax: E-mail: Web Site: http://www.nlc.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent development, Adolescent health, Aftercare, Child health, Communities, Early childhood development, Families, Health, Local programs, Public policies, Safety, Youth in transition programs

Rodriguez MA, Kane M, Alonzo-Diaz L, Flores GR. 2005. One out of three Latino adolescents overweight or at risk. Los Angeles, CA: UCLA Center for Health Policy Research; Sacramento, CA: Latino Coalition for a Healthy California, 2 pp. (Health policy fact sheet)

Annotation: This fact sheet provides information about the prevalence of overweight among Hispanic adolescents in California. The fact sheet offers statistics showing that Hispanic adolescents have a higher rate of overweight than adolescents in some other ethnic groups in the state. Risk factors for overweight are presented, and a discussion of the overall problem, including recommendations for policymakers, is included. Statistical information is presented in figures in the fact sheet.

Contact: UCLA Center for Health Policy Research, 10960 Wilshire Boulevard, Suite 1550, Los Angeles, CA 90024, Telephone: (310) 794-0909 Fax: (310) 794-2686 E-mail: chpr@ucla.edu Web Site: http://www.healthpolicy.ucla.edu Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent health, California, Ethnic factors, Hispanic Americans, Obesity, Public policies, Racial factors

Goldrick L. 2005. Youth suicide prevention: Strengthening state policies and school-based strategies. Washington, DC: National Governors Association, Center for Best Practices, 12 pp. (Issue brief)

Annotation: This issue brief focuses on state policies and school-based strategies for preventing suicide among adolescents. The brief provides an overview of the problem; provides background; and discusses the role of school in suicide prevention, state support for suicide prevention programs, and state suicide-prevention initiatives. A conclusion and selected sources for further information are included. The brief also includes endnotes.

Contact: National Governors Association, Center for Best Practices, Hall of the States, 444 North Capitol Street, Suite 267, Washington, DC 20001-1512, Telephone: (202) 624-5300 Fax: (202) 624-5313 E-mail: webmaster@nga.org Web Site: http://www.nga.org/cms/center Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescents, Initiatives, Public policies, School health programs, State programs, Suicide, Suicide prevention

Brown ER, Lavarreda SA, Rice T, Kincheloe JR, Gatchell MS. 2005. The state of health insurance in California: Findings from the 2003 Califoria Health Interview Survey. Los Angeles, CA: UCLA Center for Health Policy Research, 74 pp.

Annotation: This report, which is based on data from the 2003 and 2001 California Health Interview Surveys, examines health insurance coverage and the sources and consequences of periods of uninsurance for the nonelderly population in California. The report (1) paints an overall picture of health insurance and uninsurance in California and the changes experienced between 2001 and 2003, (2) examines changes in employer-based insurance, (3) profiles Medi-Cal and Healthy Families enrollees and their families, as well as children who are uninsured but eligible for coverage in these program, (4) examines the consequences of being uninsured vs. having coverage as it relates to access to care and getting necessary care, and (5) discusses the advantages and disadvantages of key public policy options to extend coverage to California's 6.6 million uninsured residents. Statistical information is presented in figures and tables throughout the report. An executive summary and a conclusion are included. The report includes one appendix: estimating uninsurance using population-based survey data.

Contact: UCLA Center for Health Policy Research, 10960 Wilshire Boulevard, Suite 1550, Los Angeles, CA 90024, Telephone: (310) 794-0909 Fax: (310) 794-2686 E-mail: chpr@ucla.edu Web Site: http://www.healthpolicy.ucla.edu Available from the website.

Keywords: Access to health care, California, Children, Eligibility, Enrollment, Families, Health insurance, Low income groups, Public policies, State health insurance programs, Uninsured persons

Ross DC, Cox L. 2005. In a time of growing need: State choices influence health coverage access for children and families. Washington, DC: Kaiser Commission on Medicaid and the Uninsured, 80 pp., exec. summ. (2 pp.).

Annotation: This report on an annual 50-state survey of enrollment and eligibility policies in Medicaid and the Sate Children's Health Insurance Program presents survey findings and decisions made by policymakers regarding strategies to make programs available, affordable, and easy to obtain. The report also discusses where states stand on eligibility, enrollment, and renewal procedures and cost-sharing rules and practices. Statistical information is presented in tables and figures throughout the report. The report includes an executive summary and the survey methodology.

Contact: Kaiser Program on Medicaid and the Uninsured, 1330 G Street, N.W., Washington, DC 20005, Telephone: (202) 347-5270 Fax: (202) 347-5274 E-mail: http://www.kff.org/about/contact.cfm Web Site: http://kff.org/about-kaiser-commission-on-medicaid-and-the-uninsured/ Available from the website.

Keywords: Cost sharing, Costs, Eligibility, Enrollment, Medicaid, Public policies, State Children's Health Insurance Program, State programs, Surveys, Uninsured persons

Marin PS, Brown BV. 2005. Are teens driving safer?. Washington, DC: Child Trends Databank, 10 pp. (CrossCurrents, issue 4)

Annotation: This brief provides an overview of data relevant to adolescent driving behavior, including adolescent crash rates and trends, licensure rates, seatbelt use, and other risk factors associated with fatal crashes among adolescents. The brief also discusses the possible causes of the high rates of adolescents in fatal crashes, strategies states have taken to make adolescents safer, and some implications for policy and future research. Statistical information is provided in figures and tables throughout the brief.

Contact: Child Trends, 7315 Wisconsin Avenue, Suite 1200 W, Bethesda, MD 20814, Telephone: (240) 223-9200 E-mail: Web Site: http://www.childtrends.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent behavior, Adolescent mortality, Motor vehicle crashes, Motor vehicle injuries, Motor vehicle safety, Public policies, State programs

Dorn S. 2004. Towards incremental progress: Key facts about groups of uninsured. Washington, DC: Economic and Social Research Institute, 22 pp.

Annotation: This series of fact sheets discusses various classifications of uninsured Americans who could become the focus of incremental expansions, setting out key facts and basic policy design questions for each group. The following potential coverage clusters are discussed: (1) employees of small business, (2) workers who lose their jobs, (3) workers who decline employee coverage, (4) low-income parents, (5) low-income childless families, (6) the near-elderly, (7) young adults, (8) children, and (9) immigrants. Statistical information is presented in figures throughout the fact sheets.

Contact: Economic and Social Research Institute, 2100 M Street, N.W., Suite 605, Washington, DC 20037, Telephone: (202) 833-8877 Fax: (202) 833-8932 E-mail: announcements@esresearch.org Web Site: http://www.esresearch.org/ Available from the website.

Keywords: Children, Families, Immigrants, Low income groups, Older adults, Parents, Public policies, Small businesses, Uninsured persons, Young adults

Vlassoff M, Singh S, Darroch JE, Carbone E, Bernstein S. 2004. Assessing costs and benefits of sexual and reproductive health interventions. New York, NY: Guttmacher Institute, 115 pp. (Occasional report; no. 11)

Annotation: This report aims to inform decision-makers about the key findings of existing studies about the costs and benefits of investments in sexual and reproductive health, to identify what factors the studies encompass and what they leave out, and to provide a complete picture of what the costs and benefits would look like, including benefits that are hard to measure. The report is divided into three parts. Part 1 is a review and synthesis of what is known about the costs and benefits of investments in sexual and reproductive health, part 2 is a comprehensive outline that can be used by researchers and policymakers to view the gamut of costs and benefits, and part 3 provides a partial application of the framework in the reproductive and maternal health field, namely, in the area of contraceptive services and supplies. Statistical information is presented in tables throughout the report, as well as in appendix tables. The report includes one appendix: definitions, methodology, and data sources.

Contact: Guttmacher Institute, 125 Maiden Lane, New York, NY 10038, Telephone: (212) 248-1111 Secondary Telephone: (800) 355-0244 Fax: (212) 248-1951; Washington, D.C. Office (202) 223-5756 E-mail: guttmacher@guttmacher.org Web Site: http://www.guttmacher.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Contraception, Costs, Decision making, Literature reviews, Public policies, Reproductive health, Research, Sexual health, Women's health

Proscio T. 2004. Healthy housing, healthy families: Toward a national agenda for affordable healthy homes. Columbia, MD: Enterprise Foundation, National Center for Healthy Housing, 19 pp.

Annotation: This report examines emerging trends that point to progress in improving the health prospects of low-income families through practices and policies for providing a decent and affordable home. The report discusses the history of the connection between public health and affordable housing, the health risks associated with poor housing, lead exposure in the home, evidence and standards for healthy housing, harnessing market forces to improve housing conditions through Air Plus for cleaner indoor air, forming coalitions for voluntary change, and healthy housing at the grassroots. A conclusion and endnotes are included.

Contact: National Center for Healthy Housing, 10320 Little Patuxent Parkway, Suite 500 , Columbia, MD 21044, Telephone: (410) 992-0712 Secondary Telephone: (877) 312-3046 Fax: (443) 539-4150 E-mail: info@nchh.org Web Site: http://www.nchh.org Available from the website. Document Number: ISBN 1-932699-16-3.

Keywords: Air pollution, Asthma, Coalitions, Community programs, Environmental health, Health, Housing, Housing programs, Lead poisoning, Low income groups, Public policies

Friedman JE, Magrab PR, McPherson MP. 1997. International perspectives: Building local systems of care for children with disabilities and their families. [Washington, DC]: Center for Child Health and Mental Health Policy, Georgetown University Child Development Center, 69 pp.

Annotation: This document reports on policies and practices relating to children with disabilities of countries attending the fourth international Congress on Serving Children with Disabilities in the Community held on May 30, May 31, and June 1, 1996, in Bethesda, Maryland. The report is divided into the following main sections: (1) development of national profiles, (2) developing policies and programs at the national level, (3) legislation and policy, (4) parent-professional partnerships, (5) planning and developing community-based systems of service, (5) decentralizing services for children with disabilities, (6) funding, (7) voluntary and private sector partnerships, and (8) conclusions: action agenda. The report includes two appendices: (1) the congress agenda and (2) a national profiles response form.

Contact: Maternal and Child Health Library at Georgetown University, Box 571272, Washington, DC 20057-1272, Telephone: (202) 784-9770 E-mail: mchgroup@georgetown.edu Web Site: https://www.mchlibrary.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Child health, Children with developmental disabilities, Communities, Community based services, Education, Families, Financing, International health, Legislation, National programs, Parents, Public policies, Social services

U.S. Select Panel for the Promotion of Child Health. 1981. Better health for our children: A national strategy—The report of the Select Panel for the Promotion of Child Health to the United States Congress and the Secretary of Health and Human Services. Washington, DC: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Office of the Assistant Secretary for Health and Surgeon General, 4 v., summ. (21 pp.). (Hiscock collection; related)

Annotation: This 4-volume report presents major findings and specific recommendations in five federal programs with significant impact on child health: Title V of the Social Security Act; the Special Supplemental Food Program for Women, Infants, and Children (WIC); P.L. 94-142: Education for All Handicapped Children Act; Medicaid and EPSDT; and community mental health centers and services.

Keywords: Program evaluation, Community mental health centers, EPSDT, Medicaid, Policies, Policy analysis, Public health programs, Social Security Act, Title V, WIC Program

Bokonon Systems. 1975. EPSDT policy options. Washington, DC: Bokonon Systems, 43 pp. (Hiscock Collection; no. 127)

Annotation: This paper identifies and discusses potential policy options in terms of their implications for program evaluation. It is based on reviews of legislative history and past efforts in delivery of pediatric health care.

Keywords: EPSDT, Federal programs, Program evaluation, Public policies

Foltz AM. The development of ambiguous federal policy: Early and periodic screening, diagnosis, and treatment (EPSDT). Milbank Memorial Fund Quarterly Health Soc. 53(1):35-64 Winter 1975, (Hiscock Collection; no. 98)

Foltz AM, Brown D. State response to federal policy: Children, EPSDT, and the Medicaid muddle. Medical Care. 13(8):630-42. August 1975, (Hiscock Collection; no. 113)

   

This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number U02MC31613, MCH Advanced Education Policy, $3.5 M. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.