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Strengthening the evidence for maternal and child health programs

Search Results: MCHLine

Items in this list may be obtained from the sources cited. Contact information reflects the most current data about the source that has been provided to the MCH Digital Library.


Displaying records 1 through 20 (49 total).

Western Pennsylvania Caring Foundation. n.d.. Public/private partnerships: A working model for children's health care. Pittsburgh, PA: Western Pennsylvania Caring Foundation, 1 videotape (VHS 1/2 inch).

Annotation: This videotape describes the Caring Program for Children and the Children's Health Insurance Program (Blue Cross/Blue Shield's BlueCHIP program) in Pennsylvania. It depicts the health care needs of children living in poverty and children of the uninsured working poor who do not qualify for Medicaid assistance, and explains the unique funding of this collaborative program. Appearances by Fred Rogers of "Mr. Rogers' Neighborhood" and by local medical and government officials underscore the need for this type of program, the reasons for its success, and the ways that public and private resources can join together to help ensure access to primary health care for children. The videotape concludes with a television clip describing the program on NBC's "America Close Up." [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Keywords: Access to health care, Audiovisual materials, Child health, Corporate programs, Insurance, Local MCH programs, Medical assistance, Pennsylvania, Primary care, Public private partnerships, Videotapes

National Organization of State Offices of Rural Health. n.d.. State offices of rural health. [Sterling Heights, MI]: National Organization of State Offices of Rural Health, 1 p.

Annotation: This fact sheet explains what a state office of rural health (SORH) is, goals of a SORH, and why SORHs are important. Topics include how SORHs support and build local capacity and draw attention to the challenges and successes in rural health care and how they support coordination and information sharing on rural health issues within state health agencies.

Contact: Association of State and Territorial Health Officials, 2231 Crystal Drive, Suite 450, Arlington, VA 22202, Telephone: (202) 371-9090 Fax: (571) 527-3189 Web Site: http://www.astho.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Access to health care, Health services delivery, Information dissemination, Public health infrastructure, Role, Rural health, Rural population, Service coordination, State health agencies, State programs, Technical assistance

Association of Maternal and Child Health Programs. 2017. Pathways to family leadership within AMCHP. Washington, DC: Association of Maternal and Child Health Programs, 5 pp.

Annotation: This document defines the term "family leader" and describes the roles for family leaders in the Association for Maternal and Child Health Programs' activities. Topics include title, eligibility criteria, selection process, timeline, and duties.

Contact: Association of Maternal and Child Health Programs, 1825 K Street, N.W., Suite 250, Washington, DC 20006-1202, Telephone: (202) 775-0436 Contact Phone: (202) 775-1472 Fax: (202) 478-5120 E-mail: info@amchp.org Contact E-mail: mjarvix@amchp.org Web Site: http://www.amchp.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Collaboration, Community participation, Consultants, Employment, Families, Leadership, Mentors, Parent participation, Parent professional relations, Public private partnerships, Recruitment, Special health care services, State MCH programs, Teaching, Technical assistance, Title V programs, Training, Volunteers, Work force

University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill School of Medicine, Center for Maternal and Infant Health. 2017. W.K. Kellogg Foundation Report: May 2017–The National Preconception Health & Health Care Initiative. Chapel Hill, NC: University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill School of Medicine, Center for Maternal and Infant Health, 11 pp.

Annotation: This report summarizes activities and outcomes from a project to integrate and implement preconception care into clinic and community settings. Contents include information about the project's progress toward meeting the goal and objectives, future plans, and dissemination. Topics include reframing and diversifying messages; launching a consumer-facing campaign; partnering with preconception peer educators; implementing a pregnancy intention screening tool; engaging, training, and providing technical assistance to clinics and health care systems; and catalyzing change by convening meetings. Environment, challenges, opportunities, collaboration and observations are discussed.

Contact: University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill School of Medicine, Center for Maternal and Infant Health, Old Clinic Building, Room 3018, Campus Box 7181, Chapel Hill, NC 27599-7181, Telephone: (919) 843-7865 Fax: (919) 843-7865 E-mail: cmih@med.unc.edu Web Site: https://www.mombaby.org/ Available from the website.

Keywords: Clinics, Communication, Community based services, Men's health, National initiatives, Organizational change, Outcome and process assessment, Peer education, Preconception care, Prevention programs, Program development, Public awareness campaigns, Public private partnerships, Reproductive health, Screening, Service integration, Technical assistance, Training, Women's health

University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill School of Medicine, Center for Maternal and Infant Health. 2017. The National Preconception Health & Health Care Initiative: W.K. Kellogg Foundation Evaluation Report–April 2017. Chapel Hill, NC: University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill School of Medicine, Center for Maternal and Infant Health, 6 pp.

Annotation: This report summarizes the impact of a national preconception outreach and education initiative for young men and women and clinicians. Contents include media metrics following the launch of national consumer website and social media platform to increase the visibility of preconception health messages and provide young adults with essential, evidence-based information to improve their health, reduce their risks, and improve birth outcomes. Topics include launch results and analytic snapshot and information about the related grantee and preconception peer educator ambassador programs. Additional contents summarize the impact of a partnership to integrate preconception health into routine clinical care using a learning collaborative, peer-reviewed publications, a website, traditional media, social media, expanded conversations, conferences and webinars, and a national newsletter.

Contact: University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill School of Medicine, Center for Maternal and Infant Health, Old Clinic Building, Room 3018, Campus Box 7181, Chapel Hill, NC 27599-7181, Telephone: (919) 843-7865 Fax: (919) 843-7865 E-mail: cmih@med.unc.edu Web Site: https://www.mombaby.org/ Available from the website.

Keywords: Clinics, Communication, Community based services, Mass media, Measures, Men's health, National initiatives, Organizational change, Peer education, Preconception care, Prevention programs, Program evaluation, Public awareness campaigns, Public private partnerships, Reproductive health, Screening, Service integration, Technical assistance, Training, Women's health

U.S. Maternal and Child Health Bureau, Division of Maternal and Child Health Workforce Development. 2016. Division of MCH Workforce Development strategic plan progress: 2015 highlights. Rockville, MD: U.S. Maternal and Child Health Bureau, Division of Maternal and Child Health Workforce Development, 2 pp.

Annotation: This document highlights progress made by the federal Division of Maternal and Child Health (MCH) Workforce Development toward achieving strategic goals in partnership with grantees, national partners, and the MCH field. Topics include financial investment in and expansion of MCH public health activities; the number and geographic reach of training, recruitment, and continuing education activities and the number of current and future MCH professionals trained; the number of technical assistance events provided by grantees and the number of collaborative activities between the division's programs and Title V/MCH-related agencies; innovation; the percentage of former trainees who demonstrate key outcomes; and what's ahead. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: U.S. Maternal and Child Health Bureau, Division of Maternal and Child Health Workforce Development, Health Resources and Services Administration, 5600 Fishers Lane, Rockville, MD 20857, Telephone: (301) 443-2340 Web Site: http://mchb.hrsa.gov/maternal-child-health-initiatives/workforce-training Available from the website.

Keywords: Continuing education, Federal programs, Financing, Grants, MCH programs, Public private partnerships, Strategic plans, Technical assistance, Training, Work force

U.S. Bureau of Primary Health Care. 2016. Health center program fact sheet: America's primary care safety net working to address oral health. Rockville, MD: U.S. Bureau of Primary Health Care, 2 pp.

Annotation: This fact sheet describes how health centers increase access to oral health care in the communities they serve. Contents include information about oral health services provided and the number of visits and patients served. Topics include activities to increase access to oral health care for underserved populations, modernize the safety net infrastructure and delivery system, improve oral health outcomes, and promote an innovative organizational culture. Links to resources for general information and technical assistance for health centers are also included.

Contact: U.S. Bureau of Primary Health Care, 5600 Fishers Lane, Rockville, MD 20857, Telephone: (888) 275-4772 Secondary Telephone: (877) 489-4772 Fax: (301) 480-4098 Web Site: http://www.hrsa.gov/about/organization/bureaus/bphc/index.html Available from the website.

Keywords: Access to health care, Community health centers, Comprehensive health care, Oral health, Organizational change, Primary care, Public health infrastructure, Service delivery systems, Technical assistance, Underserved communities

Crall JJ, Illum J, Martinez A, Pourat N. 2016. An innovative project breaks down barriers to oral health care for vulnerable children in Los Angeles County. Los Angeles, CA: UCLA Center for Health Policy Research, 7 pp.

Annotation: This policy brief describes a project to improve oral health care for young children at 12 federally qualified health center clinic sites with co-located oral health and primary care services in Los Angeles County, California. Contents include program goals to reduce barriers to obtaining oral health care for infants and young children from birth through age 5 and strategies and interventions to meet program goals. Topics include infrastructure, practice-management technical assistance, training, quality-improvement learning collaboratives, community systems development, and policy analysis. Additional topics include the location and characteristics of participating clinics, the number of visits for children by project year and quarter, and policy implications.

Contact: UCLA Center for Health Policy Research, 10960 Wilshire Boulevard, Suite 1550, Los Angeles, CA 90024, Telephone: (310) 794-0909 Fax: (310) 794-2686 E-mail: chpr@ucla.edu Web Site: http://www.healthpolicy.ucla.edu Available from the website.

Keywords: Access to health care, California, Clinics, Community health centers, County programs, Dental care, Infants, Local initiatives, Oral health, Policy development, Primary care, Program improvement, Public health infrastructure, Quality assurance, Service integration, Systems development, Technical assistance, Training, Work force, Young children

Murphey D. 2016. Moving beyond trauma: Child migrants and refugees in the United States. Washington, DC: Child Trends, 22 pp.

Annotation: This report examines demographic data and other research findings to focus on common challenges among immigrant children. Contents key findings and background; definitions; information about refugees and those seeking asylum, undocumented children apprehended by Border Control, and children of unauthorized immigrants; threats to migrant children's well-being, including family instability, health, education, and economic security; public assistance available to international child migrants; and recommendations and resources.

Contact: Child Trends, 7315 Wisconsin Avenue, Suite 1200 W, Bethesda, MD 20814, Telephone: (240) 223-9200 E-mail: Web Site: http://www.childtrends.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Child development, Children, Immigration, Migrants, Public assistance, Refugees, Risk factors, Trauma

Redd Z, Sacks VH, Anderson Moore K, Gooze R. 2015. Poor, unemployed, and not on welfare: A statistical look at "disconnected families". Bethesda, MD: Child Trends, 11 pp.

Annotation: This research brief uses data from the 2011/12 National Survey of Children's Health to provide a statistical look at children in disconnected families in the United States. The brief defines disconnected families as those households with at least one child (from birth to age 17), a household income at or below the federal poverty level, and with the following additional characteristics: (1) no one reported receiving cash assistance or Temporary Assistance for Needy Families in the prior 12 months, and (2) no one was employed for at least 50 of the prior 52 weeks. Topics include demographic characteristics, receipt of other public assistance programs, family functioning, and parents' health status. The analysis compares children in disconnected families with children in other poor families, and with all children in families nationally.

Contact: Child Trends, 7315 Wisconsin Avenue, Suite 1200 W, Bethesda, MD 20814, Telephone: (240) 223-9200 E-mail: Web Site: http://www.childtrends.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Child health, Family characteristics, Family health, Health status, Low income groups, Public assistance, Statistical data

Sacks VH, Sticklor L, Murphey D, Anderson Moore K. 2015. Poor, unemployed, and not on welfare: The prevalence of "disconnected families" by state. Bethesda, MD: Child Trends, 9 pp.

Annotation: This research brief uses data from the 2011/12 National Survey of Children’s Health to quantify the population of children in disconnected families in each state, and to describe the extent to which these families access other public assistance programs. The brief defines disconnected families as those households with at least one child (from birth to age 17), a household income at or below the federal poverty level, and with the following additional characteristics: (1) no one reported receiving cash assistance or Temporary Assistance for Needy Families in the prior 12 months, and (2) no one was employed for at least 50 of the prior 52 weeks.

Contact: Child Trends, 7315 Wisconsin Avenue, Suite 1200 W, Bethesda, MD 20814, Telephone: (240) 223-9200 E-mail: Web Site: http://www.childtrends.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Child health, Family characteristics, Family health, Health status, Low income groups, Public assistance, Statistical data

Association of State and Territorial Health Officials. [2014]. Environmental scan: Best practices for developing and deploying a competency-based training needs assessment. Arlington, VA: Association of State and Territorial Health Officials, 13 pp.

Annotation: This report documents the results of an environmental scan of best practices for developing and deploying a needs assessment related to current capacity and knowledge of the public health work force and identify gaps in training and technical assistance to better meet the demands of the changing health care climate. Contents include current research and needs assessments conducted since the Affordable Care Act was implemented and interviews from organizations in the field.

Contact: Association of State and Territorial Health Officials, 2231 Crystal Drive, Suite 450, Arlington, VA 22202, Telephone: (202) 371-9090 Fax: (571) 527-3189 Web Site: http://www.astho.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Competency based education, Health care reform, Model programs, Needs assessment, Public health infrastructure, Research, Technical assistance, Training, Work force

ASCD. 2014. Food stamp cuts: Effects on education. Alexandria, VA: ASCD, 4 pp. (ASCD policy points)

Annotation: This policy brief provides information on the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP), the effect of nutrition on student academics, and the status of federal nutrition programs. Contents include links to related resources, an infographic, and tips for policymakers and other stakeholders.

Contact: ASCD, 1703 North Beauregard Street, Alexandria, VA 22311-1714, Telephone: (703) 578-9600 Secondary Telephone: (800) 933+2723 Fax: (703) 575-5400 E-mail: member@ascd.org Web Site: http://www.ascd.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Academic achievement, Advocacy, Community action, Federal programs, Nutrition, Nutrition programs, Public policy, Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program

Children's Health Care Quality Measures Core Set Technical Assistance and Analytic Support Program. 2014. Strategies for using vital records to measure quality of care in Medicaid and CHIP programs. Baltimore, MD: U.S. Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services, 5 pp. (Technical assistance brief; no. 4)

Annotation: This technical assistance brief discusses strategies for accessing vital records for quality measurement and improvement efforts related maternal and infant health care in Medicaid and the Children's Health Insurance Program. The brief also gives guidance and describes resources available to states for linking vital records and Medicaid/CHIP data to increase states' capacity to report two measures in the core set of children's health care quality measures: low birth weight rate and Cesarean section rate.

Contact: U.S. Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services, 7500 Security Boulevard, Baltimore, MD 21244, Telephone: (877) 267-2323 Secondary Telephone: (410) 786-3000 Fax: Web Site: https://www.cms.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Cesarean section, Children's Health Insurance Program, Data linkage, Low birthweight, Measures, Medicaid, Program improvement, Public health infrastructure, Quality assurance, Resources for professionals, Technical assistance, Vital statistics

National Association of County and City Health Officials. 2014. Maternal, child, and adolescent health (MCAH) champions: The local MCAH capacity building project experience. Washington, DC: National Association of County and City Health Officials, 8 pp.

Annotation: This report describes a multi-year demonstration project to build local health department's (LHD's) technical knowledge and leadership abilities for maternal and child health through blended learning techniques including in-person capacity building trainings and virtual coaching, networking, and peer-to-peer sharing. Contents include information about the project framework and outcomes, participating LHDs, lessons learned, and recommendations for future capacity building projects is included. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Association of County and City Health Officials, 1100 17th Street, N.W., Seventh Floor, Washington, DC 20036, Telephone: (202) 783-5550 Fax: (202) 783-1583 E-mail: info@naccho.org Web Site: http://www.naccho.org Available from the website.

Keywords: City health agencies, County health agencies, Leadership, Local MCH programs, MCH training, Networking, Organizational change, Peer education, Public health infrastructure, Technical assistance, Work force

Hanson K, Oliveira V. 2012. How economic conditions affect participation in USDA Nutrition Assistance Programs. Washington, DC: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Economic Research Service, 56 pp. (Economic information bulletin no. 100)

Annotation: This report describes the results of a study to investigate the relationship between economic conditions and participation at the national level across the five largest nutrition assistance programs administered by the U.S. Department of Agriculture. Based on data collected between 1976 and 2010, the report suggests that economic conditions, as measured by the unemployment rate, influence participation in all of the major nutrition assistance programs, including the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP, formerly tknown as the Food Stamp Program). The report also provides a detailed description of how changes in program policies and other factors such as demographics affected participation in the nutrition programs.

Contact: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Economic Research Service, 1800 M Street, N.W., Washington, DC 20036-5831, Telephone: (202) 694-5050 E-mail: infocenterers.usda.gov Web Site: http://www.ers.usda.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Economic factors, Federal programs, Food, Low income groups, Nutrition programs, Poverty, Public assistance

Center on Budget and Policy Priorities. 2011. Online services for key low-income benefit programs: What states provide online with respect to SNAP, TANF, child care assistance, Medicaid, and CHIP. Washington, DC: Center on Budget and Policy Priorities, 42 pp.

Annotation: This paper focuses on state information available online for the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program, the Temporary Assistance for Needy Families program, child care assistance, Medicaid, and the Children's Health Insurance Program. The paper presents an overview of findings related to what online information these programs provide and a list of links, organized by state.

Contact: Center on Budget and Policy Priorities, 820 First Street N.E., Suite 510, Washington, DC 20002, Telephone: (202) 408-1080 Fax: (202) 408-1056 E-mail: center@cbpp.org Web Site: http://www.cbpp.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Child care, Children's Health Insurance Program, Costs, Government financing, Low income groups, Medicaid, Public assistance, State programs, Supplemental food programs, Temporary Assistance for Needy Families

Association of Maternal and Child Health Programs. 2010. State profiles in comprehensive family participation. Washington, DC: Association of Maternal and Child Health Programs, 12 pp.

Annotation: This brief provides examples of initiatives and strategies implemented by state Title V Maternal and Child Health (MCH) and Children and Youth with Special Health Care Needs (CYSHCN) programs to ensure strong family participation (FP) within their programs. The brief summarizes how Colorado, Missouri, New Hampshire, New York, Oregon, and Washington approach FP, including insights, successes, and challenges. Topics include the history of FP, partnerships, strategies to involve and compensate families, training and technical assistance, the value of the CYSHCN performance measure, FP in MCH, pressures on Title V MCH programs, barriers to FP, lessons learned, and future plans. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: Association of Maternal and Child Health Programs, 1825 K Street, N.W., Suite 250, Washington, DC 20006-1202, Telephone: (202) 775-0436 Fax: (202) 478-5120 E-mail: info@amchp.org Web Site: http://www.amchp.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Barriers, Collaboration, Community participation, Employment, Families, Measurement, Parent participation, Parent professional relations, Public private partnerships, Recruitment, Special health care services, State MCH programs, Technical assistance, Title V programs, Training, Work force

Joint Center for Political and Economic Studies Health Policy Institute. 2006. The impact of food insecurity on the development of young low-income black and Latino children and Protecting the health and nutrition of young children of color: The impact of nutrition assistance and income support programs. Washington, DC: Health Policy Institute, Joint Center for Political and Economic Studies, 38 pp.

Annotation: This publication includes a pair of reports demonstrating the increased vulnerability of young black and Latino children from low-income households to developmental risk linked to food insecurity and the buffering effect that family support programs can have on young black and Latino children's health and growth. The first report describes a study conducted by pediatric clinicians and public health specialists of the Children's Sentinel Nutrition Assessment Program (C-SNAP) on a sample of children under age three who attend urban emergency departments or clinics that serve large numbers of low-income families. Topics include demographic findings of the study group (primarily black and Latino), food insecurity and lack of health insurance within the group, and developmental risks linked to food insecurity. The second item discusses the role that safety net programs play in mitigating the effects of poverty and young black and Hispanic children's health and development. Topics include racial and ethnic disparities in rates of food insecurity and protecting young children of color from poverty, poor health, and food insecurity through public assistance programs in the United States.

Contact: Joint Center for Political and Economic Studies, 805 15th Street, 2nd Floor, Washington, DC 20005, Telephone: (202) 789-3500 Fax: (202) 789-6390 E-mail: general@jointcenter.org Web Site: http://www.jointcenter.org Available at no charge; also available from the website.

Keywords: Blacks, Child development, Child health, Food, Hispanic Americans, Hunger, Low income groups, Minority groups, Poverty, Public assistance, Young children

Cauthen NK, Dinan KA. 2005. Economic insecurity: Implications of federal budget proposals for low-income working families. New York, NY: National Center for Children in Poverty, 8 pp.

Annotation: This policy brief shows how proposed cuts in Medicaid, food stamps, housing assistance, and child care will affect families' ability to meet their financial responsibilities. The brief uses hypothetical families in four major U.S. cities to illustrate the effects that can be expected nationwide if proposed budget cuts are implemented. A conclusion is offered, and endnotes are included. Statistical information is presented in figures throughout the report.

Contact: National Center for Children in Poverty, 215 West 125th Street, Third Floor, New York, NY 10027, Telephone: (646) 284-9600 Fax: (646) 284-9623 E-mail: info@nccp.org Web Site: http://www.nccp.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Child care, Costs, Families, Food Stamp Program, Health insurance, Housing programs, Low income groups, Medicaid, Public assistance

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This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number U02MC31613, MCH Advanced Education Policy, $3.5 M. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.