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Strengthening the evidence for maternal and child health programs

Search Results: MCHLine

Items in this list may be obtained from the sources cited. Contact information reflects the most current data about the source that has been provided to the MCH Digital Library.


Displaying records 1 through 20 (46 total).

New Jersey Department of Health and Senior Services, Special Child, Adult, and Early Intervention Services. n.d.. Sickle cell disease: Information for school personnel (3rd ed.). Trenton, NJ: New Jersey Department of Health and Senior Services, Special Child Health and Early Intervention Services, 29 pp.

Annotation: This guide is meant to serve as a resource for school nurses and other school personnel to alert them to the signs and symptoms of complications of the sickle cell diseases and to educate them about what to do if they encounter a child with such signs and symptoms. The guide is divided into the following sections: (1) introduction, (2) what is sickle cell disease?, (3) warning signs, (4) what is sickle cell trait? (5) complications related to sickle cell disease, (6) medical management, (7) psychosocial issues, (8) the teacher, and (9) the social workers. The guide also includes the following appendices: (1) glossary, (2) bibliography, (3) New Jersey sickle cell/hemoglobinopathies treatment centers, and (4) New Jersey genetic centers for testing and family counseling.

Keywords: Child health, Genetic counseling, Genetic disorders, Genetic services, New Jersey, Patient care management, Psychosocial factors, School health services, Sickle cell disease, Sickle cell trait, Social workers, Teachers

Hagan JF Jr. 2019. Making Bright Futures work: How evidence, the periodicity schedule, and the Bright Futures guidelines impact practice. Itasca, IL: American Academy of Pediatrrics, 1 video (58 min.).

Annotation: This video reviews new clinical content in the Bright Futures Guidelines and the associated Periodicity Schedule, and discusses how to use evidence to decide on content for your practice's health supervision visits and how to identify strategies, tools, and resources to maximize efficiency for health promotion and preventive services.

Contact: American Academy of Pediatrics, 345 Park Boulevard, Itasca, IL 60143, Telephone: (630) 626-6000 Secondary Telephone: (847) 434-4000 Fax: (847) 434-8000 Web Site: https://www.aap.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent development, Adolescent health, Anticipatory guidance, Child development, Child health, Communities, Disease prevention, Emotional development, Evidence based medicine, Families, Guidelines, Health promotion, Health screening, Health supervision, Infant development, Infant health, Injury prevention, Mental health, Nutrition, Oral health, Pediatric care, Perinatal health, Physical activity, Preventive health services, Protective factors, Psychosocial development, Safety, Sexual health, Standards, Videos, Weight management

Amercan Academy of Pediatrics. 2018. Bright Futures tool and resource kit (2nd ed.). Itasca, IL: Amercan Academy of Pediatrics,

Annotation: This companion to the most current edition of the Bright Futures Guidelines for Health Supervision of Infants, Children and Adolescents, the national standard for well-child care provides updated forms and materials relate to preventive health supervision and health screening for infants, children, and adolescents. These include pre-visit questionnaires, visit documentation forms, parent and patient handouts, supplemental education handouts, and medical screening reference tables.

Contact: American Academy of Pediatrics, 345 Park Boulevard, Itasca, IL 60143, Telephone: (630) 626-6000 Secondary Telephone: (847) 434-4000 Fax: (847) 434-8000 Web Site: https://www.aap.org

Keywords: Adolescent development, Adolescent health, Anticipatory guidance, Child development, Child health, Communities, Disease prevention, Emotional development, Families, Guidelines, Health promotion, Health screening, Health supervision, Infant development, Infant health, Injury prevention, Mental health, Nutrition, Oral health, Pediatric care, Perinatal health, Physical activity, Preventive health services, Professional resources, Protective factors, Psychosocial development, Safety, Sexual health, Standards, Weight management

Hagan JF, Shaw JS, Duncan PM, eds. 2017. Bright Futures: Guidelines for health supervision of infants, children, and adolescents–Pocket guide (4th ed.). Elk Grove Village, IL: American Academy of Pediatrics, 123 pp.

Annotation: These guidelines provide background information and recommendations for promoting the healthy development of infants, children, and adolescents from birth to age 21, as well as standards for health supervision visits. Topics include lifelong health for families and communities, family support, health for children and adolescents with special health care needs, development, mental health, weight, nutrition, physical activity, oral health, use of social media, and safety and injury prevention. A pocket guide is also available. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: American Academy of Pediatrics, 345 Park Boulevard, Itasca, IL 60143, Telephone: (630) 626-6000 Secondary Telephone: (847) 434-4000 Fax: (847) 434-8000 Web Site: https://www.aap.org $16.95, plus shipping and handling. Document Number: ISBN 978-1-61002-082-4.

Keywords: Adolescent development, Adolescent health, Anticipatory guidance, Child development, Child health, Communities, Disease prevention, Emotional development, Families, Guidelines, Health promotion, Health screening, Health supervision, Infant development, Infant health, Injury prevention, Mental health, Nutrition, Oral health, Pediatric care, Perinatal health, Physical activity, Preventive health services, Protective factors, Psychosocial development, Safety, Sexual health, Standards, Weight management

Wilson-Simmons R, Jiang Y, Aratani Y. 2017. Strong at the broken places: The resiliency of low-income parents. New York, NY: National Center for Children in Poverty, Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health, 18 pp.

Annotation: This report examines factors that promote or hinder children's healthy development, drawing on recent studies to illustrate the importance of parent resiliency in the development of social-emotional competence among children from families with low incomes. The report concludes with program and policy recommendations that have proven effective in promoting the development of protective factors, reducing vulnerabilities, and cultivating resiliency among parents with low incomes and, consequently, their children.

Contact: National Center for Children in Poverty, 215 West 125th Street, Third Floor, New York, NY 10027, Telephone: (646) 284-9600 Fax: (646) 284-9623 E-mail: info@nccp.org Web Site: http://www.nccp.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Child development, Children, Competence, Coping, Emotional development, Low income groups, Mental health, Parenting skills, Parents, Policy development, Program development, Protective factors, Psychosocial development, Resilience, Vulnerability

National Child Traumatic Stress Network. 2014. Working effectively with military families: 10 key concepts all providers should know. Durham, NC: National Child Traumatic Stress Network, 4 pp.

Farrukh A, Sadwick R, Villasenor J. 2014. Youth internet safety: Risks, responses, and research recommendations. Washington, DC: Center for Technology Innovation at Brookings, 18 pp.

Annotation: This paper provides an overview of research representative of the depth and breadth of publications addressing child and youth online safety. Contents include an analysis of key findings, knowledge gaps, and policy recommendations. Topics include cyberbullying, sexual solicitation and unwanted exposure to sexual content, the role of privacy, parent and community involvement, and intergenerational gaps in attitudes toward internet safety issues.

Contact: Brookings Institution, 1775 Massachusetts Avenue, N.W., Washington, DC 20036, Telephone: (202) 797-6000 Fax: (202) 797-6004 E-mail: communications@brookings.edu Web Site: http://www.brookings.edu Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescents, Bullying, Children, Communication, Confidentiality, Internet, Interpersonal relations, Measures, Online systems, Policy development, Protective factors, Psychosocial development, Research, Risk factors, Safety, Sexual harassment, Trust

Terzian MA, Moore KA, Constance N. 2014. Transitioning to adulthood: The role of adolescent depression and suicidal ideation. Bethesda, MD: Child Trends, 10 pp. (Research brief)

Annotation: This brief presents findings from a study to assess the long-term influence of moderate-to-severe depressive or suicidal symptoms in adolescence on the transition to adulthood. The brief describes an analysis of data from the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health (Add Health) to assess the likelihood that participants were positioned to make a healthy transition to adulthood by their mid/late twenties and early thirties. Topics include factors predicting moderate or multiple problems and higher-risk transitions. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: Child Trends, 7315 Wisconsin Avenue, Suite 1200 W, Bethesda, MD 20814, Telephone: (240) 223-9200 E-mail: Web Site: http://www.childtrends.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescents, Child abuse, Depression, Longitudinal studies, Mental health, Psychosocial predictors, Risk factors, Substance use, Suicide, Transitions, Young adults

American College of Preventive Medicine. 2014. Child injury risk assessment tool [and guidance]. Washington, DC: American College of Preventive Medicine, 2 items.

Annotation: These resources are designed to help home visitors start a conversation with families and educate them on major causes of injury in the home. Contents include assessment questions, educational topics, and references for home visitors to gain additional background knowledge on each injury topic.

Contact: American College of Preventive Medicine, 1307 New York Avenue, N.W., Suite 200, Washington, DC 20005, Telephone: (202) 466-2044 Fax: (202) 466-2662 E-mail: info@acpm.org Web Site: http://www.acpm.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Communication, Data collection, Families, Forms, Home visiting, Infants, Injury prevention, Observation, Psychosocial factors, Risk assessment, Screening, Unintentional injuries, Young children

Pies C. [2012]. Moving the life course work forward: Recommendations from the Life Course Town Hall Meetings. Washington, DC: Association of Maternal and Child Health Programs; Omaha, NE: CityMatCH, 10 pp.

Annotation: This report synthesizes information from two life course town hall meetings hosted by the Association of Maternal and Child Heath Programs and CityMatCH at their respective membership meetings in September 2010 and February 2011. The life course perspective encourages focus beyond the individual and individual behavior change to look more broadly at how the interplay of biological, behavioral, psychological, environmental, and social protective and risk factors contribute to health outcomes across the life span. The report provides a brief overview of the meetings, reviews key themes and recommendations identified by participants, and offers ideas for federal agencies exploring next steps as well as for states and localities seeking to either begin or continue their efforts at integrating the life course perspective into their communities and work. [Funded in part by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: Association of Maternal and Child Health Programs, 1825 K Street, N.W., Suite 250, Washington, DC 20006-1202, Telephone: (202) 775-0436 Fax: (202) 478-5120 E-mail: info@amchp.org Web Site: http://www.amchp.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Behavior, Communities, Environmental influences, Federal programs, Health, Life course, Local programs, Protective factors, Psychosocial factors, Risk factors, State programs

National Abandoned Infants Assistance Resource Center. 2012. Women and children with HIV/AIDS. Berkeley, CA: National Abandoned Infants Assistance Resource Center, 23 pp. (Fact sheet)

Annotation: This fact sheet examines the impact of HIV/AIDS on women and children in the United States. It includes an overview of the problem; describes how the virus is transmitted to women and from women to children; and discusses the symptoms and outcomes. The fact sheet also addresses HIV testing; the psychosocial factors and issues that can lead to HIV; and the societal and cultural stigma that can impact the lives of infected women and children. It also covers disclosure, legal issues, various forms of treatment, and the grief and loss that families experience when they lose a loved one to AIDS. A description of federal programs and services to assist families affected by HIV and AIDS is also provided. An online training tutorial on this topic is also available.

Contact: National Abandoned Infants Assistance Resource Center, Center for Child & Youth Policy , University of California, Berkeley, 1950 Addison Street, Suite 104, , Berkeley, CA 94720-7402, Telephone: (510) 643-8390 Fax: (510) 643-7019 E-mail: aia@berkeley.edu Web Site: http://aia.berkeley.edu/ Available from the website.

Keywords: Risk factors, Training, AIDS, Child health, Counseling, Federal programs, HIV, High risk infants, High risk mothers, Psychosocial factors, Women's health

Center on the Developing Child at Harvard University. 2010. Maternal depression can undermine the development of young children. Cambridge, MA: Center on the Developing Child at Harvard University, 23 pp. (Working paper no. 8)

Annotation: This working paper summarizes recent research on the harmful effects of chronic and severe maternal depression on families and children. It examines why the failure to address the consequences of depression for large numbers of vulnerable young children presents a missed opportunity to support children and families in a way that could support the well being of society as a whole. The paper discusses neuroscience and developmental research, as well as program evaluation findings related to maternal depression. The paper also describes (1) common misconceptions concerning the effectiveness of treatment for depressed mothers and the effects of maternal depression on children; (2) the gap between science-based evidence of the problem and the lack of studies conducted in the United States that evaluate the effectiveness of programs designed to prevent postpartum depression (PPD); and (3) the implications for the evidence-based findings on policy and programs.

Contact: Center on the Developing Child at Harvard University, 50 Church Street, Fourth Floor, Cambridge, MA 02138, Telephone: (617) 496-0578 E-mail: developingchild@harvard.edu Web Site: http://www.developingchild.harvard.edu Available from the website.

Keywords: Child development, Child mental health, Maternal depression, Maternal mental health, Mental health services, Postpartum depression, Psychosocial factors, Women's health, Young children

U.S. Maternal and Child Health Bureau. 2009. EMSC, after the injury: Helping parents help their kids recover. Rockville, MD: U.S. Maternal and Child Health Bureau,

Annotation: This webinar discusses the pyscho-social needs of children involved in a traumatic injury, and describes and demonstrates a Web site designed to help parent's better assist their children in recovering from traumatic stress. The webinar is presented in audio, video, captions, slides, and transcripts formats. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: U.S. Maternal and Child Health Bureau, Health Resources and Services Administration, 5600 Fishers Lane, Rockville, MD 20857, Telephone: (301) 443-2170 Web Site: https://mchb.hrsa.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescents, Children, Consumer education materials, Emotional trauma, Mental health, Parent education, Psychosocial factors, Resource materials, Trauma

Maynard RA, ed. 2008. Kids having kids: Economic costs and social consequences of teen pregnancy [2nd ed]. Washington, DC: Urban Institute Press, 448 pp.

Annotation: This book consists of a background study of the historical and international trends in adolescent pregnancy and the effects of early pregnancy on the mother's and, eventually, the child's education, work history, and life-long earnings. Seven coordinated studies then focus on specific elements in the data and use statistical projections that take into account other social factors, such as education, race, marital status, cultural background, and neighborhood crime incidence, to estimate the consequences of early pregnancy for the mothers, for the fathers, for the children (health, abuse, incarceration, life chances), and for society. Numerous tables and graphs illustrate the data.

Contact: University Press of America, 4501 Forbes Boulevard, Suite 200, Lanham, MD 20706, Telephone: (410) 459-3366 Secondary Telephone: (800) 462-6420 Web Site: http://www.univpress.com Available in libraries. Document Number: ISBN 0-87766-654-7.

Keywords: Adolescent employment, Adolescent fathers, Adolescent mothers, Adolescent pregnancy, Adolescents, Child abuse, Child support, Child welfare, Demography, Economic factors, Educational attainment, Employment, Family income, Health care utilization, Incarcerated youth, Low income groups, Maternal age, Pregnant adolescents, Psychosocial predictors, Social support, Statistics, Unplanned pregnancy, Unwanted pregnancy

Blount A. 2007. Integrated primary care bibliography. (Rev. ed.). [Auburn, MA: Integrated Primary Care, Inc.],

Center for the Study of Social Policy. [2006]. Strengthening families: A guidebook for early childhood programs. (Rev. 2nd ed.). Washington, DC: Center for the Study of Social Policy, 116 pp. (Strengthening families through early care and education)

Annotation: This guidebook focuses on the roles played by early childhood professionals in protecting and nurturing young children and promoting their social and emotional development. It explores the roles early care and education centers can play in preventing child abuse and neglect and outlines strategies that programs use to support and strengthen families and to provide special help to those that may be at risk. Section one lays the framework of the approach through the use of a "protective factors" model. Section two details strategies used by the programs studied to build protective factors and includes a self-assessment tool to help implement these strategies. Section three describes specific programmatic elements that enhance the ability of early care and education programs to prevent child abuse and neglect. Appendices include contact information for programs included in the project; useful resources and tools on preventing child abuse and neglect, conducting family assessments, and working with mental health consultants; and a bibliography of the research literature underlying the protective factors approach.

Contact: Center for the Study of Social Policy, 1575 Eye Street, N.W., Suite 500, Washington, DC 20005, Telephone: (202) 371-1565 Fax: (202) 371-1472 E-mail: info@cssp.org Web Site: http://www.cssp.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Child abuse, Child neglect, Community programs, Early childhood development, Family centered services, Family support services, Models, Prevention services, Protective factors, Psychosocial development, Young children

DePanfilis D. 2006. Child neglect: A guide for prevention, assessment, and intervention. Washington, DC: U.S. Office on Child Abuse and Neglect, 104 pp.

Annotation: This manual on child neglect assessment, prevention, and intervention is the third in a series of related manuals. This manual, which builds on the previous two, addresses the following topics: definition and scope of neglect, impact of neglect, risk and protective factors, assessement of neglect, and prevention and intervention. Endnotes are included. The manual includes four appendices: (1) glossary, (2) resource lists, (3) state telephone numbers for reporting abuse, and (4) neglect and the Child and Family Services Reviews.

Contact: Child Welfare Information Gateway, Administration on Children, Youth, and Families, Children's Bureau, 1250 Maryland Avenue, S.W., Eighth Floor, Washington, DC 20024, Telephone: (800) 394-3366 Secondary Telephone: E-mail: info@childwelfare.gov Web Site: http://www.childwelfare.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Behavior development, Child development, Child health, Child neglect, Cognitive development, Early childhood development, Emotional development, Families, Intellectual development, Intervention, Physical development, Prevention, Protective factors, Psychosocial development, Risk factors

Child Trends with American Academy of Pediatrics Center for Child Health Research. 2004. Early child development in social context: A chartbook. New York, NY: Commonwealth Fund, 115 pp.

Annotation: This chartbook contains over 30 key indicators of development for children from birth through age 6, along with social factors in the family and neighborhood that affect these outcomes. Indicators are grouped into the following topic areas: socioemotional development, intellectual development, child health, family functioning, parental health, health care receipt, community and neighborhood factors, child care, and demographic factors. For each indicator, text is presented that includes an explanation of why the indicator is important for early development, bulleted findings from existing data sources featuring differences across social groups, and, when available, trends over time. Practical implications for action by policymakers and practitioners and for parents are also presented. For each indicator, one or two illustrative charts are included, as well. The chartbook concludes with a technical appendix and a list of endnotes.

Contact: Commonwealth Fund, One East 75th Street, New York, NY 10021, Telephone: (212) 606-3800 Fax: (212) 606-3500 E-mail: info@cmwf.org Web Site: http://www.commonwealthfund.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Child care, Child health, Communities, Demography, Early childhood development, Emotional development, Ethnic factors, Families, Health care utilization, Infant development, Infants, Intellectual development, Parents, Psychosocial development, Racial factors, Statistics, Trends, Young children

Center for Mental Health in Schools. 2003. Youngsters' mental health and psychosocial problems: What are the data?. Los Angeles, CA: Center for Mental Health in Schools, 59 pp. (A Center report)

Annotation: The purpose of this report is to provide a synthesis of the best data on the prevalence and incidence of children's and adolescents' mental and psychosocial problems and to clarify the limitations of what has been gathered so far. The report included the following main sections: (1) how many young people are affected, (2) how are the data commonly reported, (3) increasing rates, and (4) concluding comments. Statistical information is presented in tables throughout the report. The report includes four appendices that contain mental health data, special education data, psychosocial problems data, and related cultural concerns data. The report also includes a list of references. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: Center for Mental Health in Schools, UCLA School Mental Health Project, Box 951563, Los Angeles, CA 90095-1563, Telephone: (310) 825-3634 Secondary Telephone: (866) 846-4843 Fax: (310) 206-8716 E-mail: smhp@ucla.edu Web Site: http://smhp.psych.ucla.edu Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent mental health, Child mental health, Cultural factors, Data, Mental disorders, Psychosocial factors, Special education

American Dietetic Association. 2002. Adolescent nutrition: A springboard for health. Journal of the American Dietetic Association 102(3, Supplement): S1-S111,

Annotation: This supplement to the March 2002 issue of the Journal of the American Dietetic Association focuses on adolescent nutrition. Articles from varying authors include suggestions on the many approaches that have been successful in teaching adolescents about healthful eating and the importance of physical activity (e.g., interventions, Web sites, comprehensive nutrition screening, counseling sessions, school-based nutrition promotion programs). Topics include the physical, psychosocial, and environmental issues adolescents face as they mature into young adulthood; and how dietetic professionals can address these concerns while providing nutrition counseling. The supplement issue concludes with a section for professional interest on adolescent health organizations. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics, 120 South Riverside Plaza, Suite 2000, Chicago, IL 60606-6995, Telephone: (800) 877-1600 Secondary Telephone: (312) 899-0400 Contact Phone: (312) 899-4854 Contact Fax: (312) 899-4739 Contact E-mail: sdenny@eatright.org Web Site: http://www.eatright.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescents, Dietary guidelines, Dietitians, Health promotion, Nutrition, Physical activity, Program descriptions, Psychosocial development, Research, Social factors, Weight management, Young adults

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This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number U02MC31613, MCH Advanced Education Policy, $3.5 M. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.