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Strengthening the evidence for maternal and child health programs

Search Results: MCHLine

Items in this list may be obtained from the sources cited. Contact information reflects the most current data about the source that has been provided to the MCH Digital Library.


Displaying records 1 through 20 (28 total).

Breakey G. n.d.. Facilitation of Primary Care Physician Participation in Preventive Health Care of Children Age 0-5 from Underserved, Diverse Cultural Populations: [Final report]. Honolulu, HI: Hawaii Family Stress Center, 30 pp.

Annotation: This project aimed to reduce the incidence of poor health characteristics among low-income, culturally diverse populations by promoting the involvement of primary care physicians (pediatricians) in early screening and intervention. Project goals included increasing the level of preventive health care for underserved children, reducing the severity of psychosocial problems, increasing physicians' sense of involvement as part of a team in providing services to project children and their families, and demonstrating a practical process for accomplishing these goals which can be replicated across the nation. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Technical Information Service, U.S. Department of Commerce, 5301 Shawnee Road, Alexandria, VA 22312, Telephone: (703) 605-6050 Secondary Telephone: (888) 584-8332 E-mail: customerservice@ntis.gov Web Site: http://www.ntis.gov Document Number: NTIS PB93-152833.

Keywords: American Academy of Pediatrics, Child Abuse and Neglect Preventive, Continuing Education, Developmentally Delayed/Disabled, EPSDT, Hawaiians, Health Care, Health Supervision Guidelines, High risk children, Low income groups, Medicaid, Primary Care, Psychological Problems, Well Child Care

American Academy of Pediatrics. 2014-. Early Brain and Child Development (EBCD) education and training modules. Elk Grove Village, IL: American Academy of Pediatrics, multiple items.

Annotation: These five modules and accompanying guides for primary care health professionals provide information and resources on early brain development, toxic stress, adverse childhood experiences, supporting parents and cultivating community relationships, and advocacy. Each module includes a PowerPoint presentation with presenter notes and a guide with tips for presenting the content. Each module also contains activities, video clips, prompting questions, and case studies to encourage active participation.

Contact: American Academy of Pediatrics, 345 Park Boulevard, Itasca, IL 60143, Telephone: (630) 626-6000 Secondary Telephone: (847) 434-4000 Fax: (847) 434-8000 Web Site: https://www.aap.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Advocacy, Brain, Cognitive development, Early childhood development, Emotional development, Mental health, Parent support services, Primary care, Psychological development, Relationships, Stress, Training, Vulnerability

Lorenzo SB. 2014. Emotional, behavioral, and mental health challenges in kids and teens: Resources for families (2nd ed., upd.). Washington, DC: National Center for Education in Maternal and Child Health, 1 p.

Annotation: This brief is designed to help families find mental health care, services, and support and websites about emotional, behavioral, and mental health challenges in kids and teens. A separate section presents websites about babies and young kids. Another lists websites for teens. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Center for Education in Maternal and Child Health, Georgetown University, Box 571272, Washington, DC 20057-1272, Telephone: (202) 784-9770 E-mail: mchgroup@georgetown.edu Web Site: https://www.ncemch.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescents, Affective disorders, Behavior development, Behavior disorders, Bibliographies, Children, Electronic publications, Emotional development, Family support services, Mental health, Psychological needs, Social behavior

Murphey D, Barry M, Vaughn B. 2013. Positive mental health: Resilience. Washington, DC: Child Trends, 6 pp. (Adolescent health highlight)

Annotation: This report presents research findings on characteristics that are associated with adolescent resilience, describes program strategies that promote resilience, and discusses links between resilience and avoidance of risk-taking behaviors. Topics include relationships and social skills, hormonal and physical changes, self confidence, spirituality, emotional self-regulation, and overall well-being. Resources and references for additional information on resilience in adolescence is provided.

Contact: Child Trends, 7315 Wisconsin Avenue, Suite 1200 W, Bethesda, MD 20814, Telephone: (240) 223-9200 E-mail: Web Site: http://www.childtrends.org Available from the website. Document Number: Pub. no. 2013-03.

Keywords: Adolescence, Adolescent behavior, Adolescent development, Coping, Psychological development, Psychosocial development, Resilience, Risk taking, Youth

Boyd LW. 2013. Theraeputic foster care: Exceptional care for complex, trauma-impacted youth in foster care. Washington, DC: First Focus, State Policy and Advocacy Reform Center, 13 pp.

Annotation: This report provides information about best practices in therapeutic or treatment foster care (TFC), a clinical intervention for youth from birth to age 18 who have severe mental, emotional, or behavioral health needs. Topics include essential partners; building relationships among provider agencies and child advocates; example practices in Connecticut, Illinois, Michigan, Oklahoma, Nebraska; efforts to expand the focus beyond safety and permanency to well-being for youth in therapeutic foster care; and public policy challenges.

Contact: First Focus, 1400 Eye Street, N.W., Suite 650, Washington, DC 20005, Telephone: (202) 657-0670 Fax: (202) 657-0671 Web Site: http://www.firstfocus.net Available from the website.

Keywords: Access to health care, Adolescents with special health care needs, Advocacy, Behavioral medicine, Children with special health care needs, Foster care, Foster parents, Health services delivery, Intervention, Medically fragile children, Mental health, Policy development, Psychological needs, Reimbursement, Relationships, Therapeutics, Training, Trauma care, Youth

Bandy T, Moore KA. 2011. What works for promoting and enhancing positive social skills: Lessons from experimental evaluations of programs and interventions. Washington, DC: Child Trends, 11 pp. (Fact sheet)

Annotation: This fact sheet reviews 38 evaluated programs to identify what works to promote social skills among children and adolescents (such as getting along with others, expressing empathy to others, trying to resolve conflicts, and regulating emotions and behaviors). It highlights programs (27 out of 38) that significantly increased at least one social skill in children and adolescents. It also discusses the effectiveness of programs that incorporated peer-teaching, group discussion, or role modeling, as well as teacher-led instruction. The fact sheet includes a chart summarizing the programs and whether they were found to work, not proven to work, or had mixed findings.

Contact: Child Trends, 7315 Wisconsin Avenue, Suite 1200 W, Bethesda, MD 20814, Telephone: (240) 223-9200 E-mail: Web Site: http://www.childtrends.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent development, Adolescents, Child development, Children, Community programs, Program evaluation, Psychological development, Psychosocial development, Social behavior, Social interaction, Social skills

Terzian M, Hamilton K, Ling T. 2011. What works for acting-out (externalizing) behavior: Lessons from experimental evaluations of social interventions. Washington, DC: Child Trends, 10 pp. (Fact sheet)

Annotation: This fact sheet reviews 38 evaluated programs to identify what works to promote social skills among children and adolescents (such as getting along with others, expressing empathy to others, trying to resolve conflicts, and regulating emotions and behaviors). It highlights programs (27 out of 38) that significantly increased at least one social skill in children and adolescents. It also discusses the effectiveness of programs that incorporated peer-teaching, group discussion, or role modeling, as well as teacher-led instruction. The fact sheet includes a chart summarizing the programs and whether they were found to work, not proven to work, or had mixed findings.

Contact: Child Trends, 7315 Wisconsin Avenue, Suite 1200 W, Bethesda, MD 20814, Telephone: (240) 223-9200 E-mail: Web Site: http://www.childtrends.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent development, Adolescents, Child development, Children, Model programs, Program evaluation, Psychological development, Psychosocial development, Social behavior, Social interaction, Social skills

Marshfield Clinic Research Foundation. 2010. North American guidelines for children's agricultural tasks. [Marshfield, WI]: Marshfield Clinic Research Foundation,

Annotation: This electronic resource presents guidelines to help adults match a child's physical and mental abilities with the requirements of different agricultural jobs. They are intended to help reduce childhood agricultural injuries. Topics include animal care, manual labor, implement and haying operations, tractor fundamentals, and other tasks. Some of the guidelines are available in Spanish.

Contact: Marshfield Clinic Research Foundation, 1000 North Oak Avenue, Marshfield, WI 54449, Telephone: (800) 782-8581 Fax: (715) 389-3319 Web Site: http://www.marshfieldclinic.org/research/pages/index.aspx Available from the website.

Keywords: Agricultural injuries, Child safety, Guidelines, Injury prevention, Motor development, Occupational safety and health, Psychological development, Spanish language materials

Brazelton TB, Greenspan SI. 2000. The irreducible needs of children: What every child must have to grow, learn, and flourish. Cambridge, MA: Perseus Publishing, 228 pp.

Annotation: This book discusses the most basic needs in children that must be met to ensure that they will thrive. The first six chapters deal with six of the seven irreducible needs of children: for ongoing nurturing relationships; for physical protection, safety, and regulation; for experiences tailored to individual differences; for developmentally appropriate experiences; for limit setting, structure, and expectations; for stable, supportive communities and cultural continuity. The seventh chapter addresses the need to protect the future by developing a world that offers future generations of children a secure and safe world that fosters their development. Appendixes include the Touchpoints model; a functional development growth chart and questionnaire; a list of organizations working to promote child welfare; and references.

Contact: Perseus Books Group, 5500 Central Avenue, Boulder, CO 80301, Telephone: (800) 386-5656 Fax: (303) 449-3356 E-mail: westvieworders@perseusbooks.com Web Site: http://www.perseusbooksgroup.com Available in libraries. Document Number: ISBN 0-7382-0325-4.

Keywords: Child care, Child welfare, Children, Community role, Development, Early childhood education, Family relations, Foster care, Infants, Out of home care, Physical development, Psychological development, Socialization

Squib B, Deitz SJ. 2000. Learning activities for infants and toddlers: An easy guide for everyday use. Washington, DC: Child Resources International, 321 pp. (Step by Step: A program for children and families)

Annotation: This book offers caregivers and parents strategies for supporting infant and toddler development based on the latest information about how infants and toddlers grow and learn. The book includes activities that adults who care for infants and toddlers can use. The book is divided into the following sections: birth to 8 months, 8 to 18 months, 18 to 24 months, 2-year-olds, using themes with toddlers and 2-year-olds, and families and communities. Each developmental stage is divided by theme, such as understanding self, communicating with others, and moving around and making things work.

Contact: Children's Resources International, 2801 New Mexico Avenue, N.W., Suite 1020, Washington, DC 20007, E-mail: pcoughlin@childrensresources.org Document Number: ISBN 1-889544-12-4.

Keywords: Cognitive development, Communication, Curricula, Early childhood development, Early childhood education, Infant development, Physical development, Psychological development, Psychomotor development, Speech development

Eliot L. 1999. What's going on in there?: How the brain and mind develop in the first five years of life. New York: Random House, Bantam Books, 533 pp.

Annotation: This book explores neural and psychological development from conception to age five. It covers topics such as critical prenatal influences, infant stimulation, sex linked developmental differences, and the nature nurture controversy. The author devotes a chapter each to the development of touch, balance and motion, smell, taste, vision, hearing, motor skills, social and emotional growth, and the emergence of memory. The final chapter is suggestions for raising a smarter child.

Contact: Random House, Bantam Books, 1540 Broadway, New York, NY 10036, E-mail: library@randomhouse.com Web Site: http://www.randomhouse.com Available in libraries. Document Number: ISBN 0-553-10274-5.

Keywords: Brain, Child development, Cognitive development, Early childhood development, Infant development, Infant stimulation, Intellectual development, Language development, Memory, Nature nurture controversy, Neural development, Prenatal influences, Psychological development, Sex linked developmental differences

Ragin A, Rasinski KA, Cerbone FG, Johnson RA. 1999. The relationship between mental health and substance abuse among adolescents. Rockville, MD: U.S. Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, Office of Applied Studies, 220 pp. (Analytic series: A-9)

Annotation: This report presents an examination of the association between psychological functioning and substance use among adolescents aged 12 to 17 using data from the 1994-1996 National Household Survey on Drug Abuse (NHSDA). The survey, conducted annually by Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA), provides estimates of the prevalence of use of a variety of illicit drugs, alcohol, and tobacco, based on a nationally representative sample of the civilian non institutionalized population. In addition, the 1994-1996 surveys include mental health data not previously available. This publication was developed by the National Opinion Research Center.

Keywords: Adolescent mental health, Adolescents, Health surveys, National surveys, Psychological development, Psychological evaluation, Substance abuse

U.S. Center for Mental Health Services and National Institute of Mental Health. 1999. Mental health: A report of the Surgeon General. Rockville, MD: U.S. Center for Mental Health Services; Bethesda, MD: National Institute of Mental Health, 458 pp., exec. summ. (21 pp.).

Annotation: This report is a summary of an extensive review of more than 3,000 research articles and other materials in the field of mental health. Chapter 1 is an overview of the themes in the report and includes copies of the conclusions from the chapters that follow. Chapter 2 is titled the Fundamentals of Mental Health and Mental Illness. It discusses the structure of the brain, the etiology and epidemiology of mental illness, physical and psychological development, risk factors and prevention, mental health services, and cultural diversity as a factor in treatment and response. Chapter 3 is about children and mental health. It examines normal development, risk factors and prevention, mental disorders in children, and health service delivery. Chapter 4 discusses adults and mental health, and chapter 5 focuses on older adults. The topic of Chapter 6 is organizing and financing mental health services. Chapter 7 deals with ethical, legal, and policy issues in the confidentiality of mental health information. Chapter 8 proposes broad courses of action to remove barriers that prevent people from obtaining mental health treatment.

Contact: U.S. Government Publishing Office, 732 North Capitol Street, N.W., Washington, DC 20401, Telephone: (202) 512-1800 Secondary Telephone: (866) 512-1800 Fax: (202) 512-2104 E-mail: contactcenter@gpo.gov Web Site: http://www.gpo.gov Available from the website. Document Number: ISBN 0-1605-9001-9.

Keywords: Adolescents, Adults, Attitudes, Children, Confidentiality, Cultural diversity, Epidemiology, Ethics, Etiology, Health care financing, Legal issues, Mental disorders, Mental health, Mental health services, Models, Older adults, Physical development, Prevention, Psychological development, Public opinion, Reports, Risk factors, Service delivery

Greenspan S, Lewis NB. 1999. Building healthy minds: The six experiences that create intelligence and emotional growth in babies and young children. Cambridge, MA: Perseus Publishing, 398 pp.

Annotation: This book for parents outlines six core stages to promote intelligence and emotional growth from birth to preschool. The stages are described in each chapter: (1) becoming calm, attentive, and interested in the world; (2) falling in love; (3) becoming a two-way communicator; (4) solving problems and forming a sense of self; (5) discovering a world of ideas; and (6) building bridges between ideas. Additional chapters include techniques such as "floor-time", nurturing all six levels of intelligence and emotional health at the same time, and giving more and expecting more, the concluding chapter on building on the six stages and challenging the child in further development. The appendices contain a functional developmental growth chart and questionnaire; the six essential developmental stages and the growth of the brain; and ten ways to environmentally childproof your home. The book concludes with an index.

Contact: Perseus Publishing, 11 Cambridge Center, Cambridge, MA 02142, Telephone: (617) 252-5298 Secondary Telephone: (800) 255-1514 Fax: (800) 324-3791 Web Site: http://www.perseuspublishing.com $18.00, plus shipping and handling. Document Number: ISBN 0-7382-0356-4.

Keywords: Child development, Communication skills, Consumer education materials, Developmental stages, Environmental health, Infant development, Nonverbal communication, Parent child relations, Parenting, Psychological health, Young children

Grigorenko EL, Sternberg RJ. 1999. Assessing cognitive development in early childhood. Washington, DC: World Bank, 62 pp.

Annotation: The purpose of this review is to summarize the quantitative and qualitative characteristics of psychological tests and other assessment instruments used to evaluate the cognitive functioning of infants, toddlers, and preschool children. The review is divided into three parts. Part 1 summarizes general principles of early childhood assessment. Part 2 describes the major domains in which the various assessment tools can be compared, evaluated, and selected. Part 3 presents brief descriptions and evaluations of selected instruments. Some information is presented in tables. The review also includes concluding remarks and a list of references.

Contact: World Bank, 1818 H Street, N. W., Washington, DC 20433, Telephone: (202) 477-1000 Contact Phone: (202) 473-3427 Fax: (202) 477-6391 Contact Fax: (202) 522-3233 E-mail: books@worldbank.org Contact E-mail: myoung3@worldbank.org Web Site: http://www.worldbank.org

Keywords: Assessment, Cognitive development, Early childhood development, Evaluation, Evaluation methods, Infants, Psychological evaluation, Tests, Young children

Cohon J. [1997]. Fragile Infant Special Care Program [Final report]. San Francisco, CA: Edgewood Children's Center, 44 pp.

Annotation: This program: (1) Offered direct interventions with infants and their biological and foster families; (2) created a partnership between the private-sector Edgewood Children's Center and the public-sector SFDSS; (3) supported SFDSS Baby Moms and Licensing Unit staff in recruiting foster homes that were racially similar to the population of infants being served and that are located in San Francisco; (4) increased the medical and developmental knowledge of newly recruited Baby Moms foster parents by organizing monthly training and support meetings; (5) assessed the medical and developmental status of 100 percent of Baby Moms infants; and (6) continued psychological assessments of foster parent applicants. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Keywords: Children with Special Health care Needs, Developmental Evaluation, Early Intervention, Foster Care, Foster Children, Psychological Evaluation, Public Private Partnerships

Leffert N, Benson P, Roehlkepartain JL. 1997. Starting out right: Developmental assets for children. Minneapolis, MN: Search Institute, 116 pp.

Annotation: This book offers information on the developmental assets needed by children to grow into resilient, socially responsible, and productive adults. The book concentrates on the attitudes, skills and community supports which foster good developmental outcomes in children and youth. A model of forty developmental assets are identified, and information is given on how these forty assets were selected. External assets are categorized as support, empowerment, boundaries, and constructive use of time. Internal assets are categorized as commitment to learning, positive values, social competencies and positive identity. A list of suggested readings is included.

Contact: Search Institute, The Banks Building, 615 First Avenue N.E., Suite 125, Minneapolis, MN 55413, Telephone: (612) 376-8955 Secondary Telephone: (800) 888-7828 Contact Phone: (800) 888-7828 Fax: (612) 376-8956 E-mail: si@search-institute.org Contact E-mail: search@search-institute.org Web Site: http://www.search-institute.org/ $14.95 plus $5.50 shipping and handling for first item, $.25 for each additional item. Document Number: ISBN 1-57482-364-7.

Keywords: Child behavior, Child development, Community role, Emotional maturity, Protective factors, Psychological characteristics, Psychosocial development

Goodyer IM, ed. 1995. The depressed child and adolescent: Development and clinical perspectives. Port Chester, NY: Cambridge University Press, 354 pp. (Cambridge monographs in child and adolescent psychiatry)

Annotation: This book, aimed at clinical psychologists and psychiatrists, discusses the etiology, diagnosis, and treatment of depression in children and adolescents. Chapters mention etiology, such as the effects of emotional development in infancy, life events and genetics; physiology; diagnosis; treatment, including psychopharmacology and psychotherapy; and suicidal behavior and its prevention. The final chapter covers research into the affected child's subsequent development.

Contact: Cambridge University Press, 32 Avenue of the Americas, New York, NY 10013-2473, Telephone: 212-924-3900 Secondary Telephone: (914) 937-9600 Fax: 212-691-3239 E-mail: information@cup.org Web Site: http://www.cambridge.org/us/ Document Number: ISBN 0-521-43326-6.

Keywords: Adolescent development, Child development, Depression, Drug therapy, Etiology, Incidence, Psychiatry, Psychological characteristics, Psychological development, Psychotherapy, Suicide

Garbarino J. 1993. Let's talk about living in a world with violence: An activity book for school-age children. Chicago, IL: Erikson Institute, 44 pp.

Annotation: This activity book is designed to help children process their feelings, thoughts, and experiences about violence. Through various activities in the book children will be able to explore how violence they see in different settings, such as on television or at school, affects them. The book is primarily for children ages 7 to 11 living in urban areas. A listing of other resource materials is included. The author also includes a parents guide as well as a guide for teachers, counselors, and other professionals that supplement this activity book.

Keywords: Materials for children, Psychological effects, Psychosocial development, Violence, Witnesses

Musick JS. 1993. Young, poor, and pregnant. New Haven, CT: Yale University Press, 271 pp.

Annotation: This book discusses the psychological components that accompany adolescent parenthood. The author examines the effect of personal histories as well as broader social factors such as poverty and violence in shaping the psychological development of a adolescent parent. Specific chapters focus on topics such as adolescent psychosocial development, intervention programs, and adolescents as parents.

Contact: Yale University Press, P.O. Box 209040, New Haven, CT 06520-9040, Telephone: (203) 432-0960 Fax: (203) 432-0948 Web Site: http://yalepress.yale.edu/yupbooks/home.asp Available in libraries. Document Number: ISBN 0-300-05353-3.

Keywords: Adolescent pregnancy, Adolescents, Mental health, Psychological factors, Psychosocial development

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This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number U02MC31613, MCH Advanced Education Policy, $3.5 M. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.